Router bit for guitar neck

Discussion in 'The DIY Tool Shed' started by Dpalms, Jun 9, 2019.

  1. Dpalms

    Dpalms TDPRI Member

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    Is there anywhere a router bit can be bought for making a telecaster neck, I'm sure I saw one on this site before.
     
  2. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Silver Supporter

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    Last edited: Jun 9, 2019
  3. telepraise

    telepraise Tele-Holic

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    I would figure out out which neck contour really fits your had (Warmoth has some great descriptions) and create yourself some profile templates. I've never carved an electric neck, but I'm thinking that because of the taper in two dimensions it's not a consistent radius for the full length and, depending on the contour, may actually be more of a parabola.
     
  4. Freeman Keller

    Freeman Keller Tele-Afflicted

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    What Praise just said. Unless you are going into business making a lot of the same necks I can't see limiting yourself to one profile determined by the maker of the bit and doing all the work to make the three dimensional router jig. Seems like it would be almost easier to put together a duplicarver.

    I've made several sets of templates of necks that I really like. It might be heresy but my personal tele-clone has the profile from a vintage Les Paul that I happened to love.

    IMG_4673.JPG

    And the two guitars that I built after that one have completely different neck widths and profiles - nice to not be locked into one shape
     
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  5. Jim_in_PA

    Jim_in_PA Tele-Meister Ad Free Member

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    Anything that has a variable geometry can't really be cut with fixed profile router or shaper tooling, whether it's a guitar neck or some other "thing". You may be able to do a bit of the roughing work (pardon the pun) using a table mounted router and a workpiece holding jig with stops to cut down on the work. This is very similar to how a CNC is used to produce the back of the guitar neck where one step is to hog off the excess material before using a cutter that's finer for completing the profile. It will require multiple passes with different cutter heights with great care taken to not take off too much from any location along the length of the neck. (IE...a bit of math) From there, refining things by hand would be "traditional".
     
  6. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Silver Supporter

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    Actually a router bit like I illustrated can cut the shaft of a guitar between the transitions. It requires an angled jig to raise the nut end up about 1/8". Depending on the bit, it'll overlap at the nut end or leave a flat at the heel end. This features then get blended in when the transitions are worked into the mix. I suspect a good number of guitar boom guitars were made in furniture factories this way.

    I actually did this with a similar bit on a Bosch overarm router. It scared the crap out of me, so there wasn't a second neck made that way. I prefer the safety of a smaller bit and more controllable situation.


    Not me but it works for this post:





     
    Last edited: Jun 9, 2019
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  7. chauncy

    chauncy Tele-Meister Gold Supporter

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  8. Davecam48

    Davecam48 Friend of Leo's Ad Free Member

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    The router bit as Chauncy posted in #7 will be ok for the basic shape but you will have to arrange it to cut the correct taper from heel to headstock. These bits do a good job at roughing the basic shape but the real shaping to fit the hand will have to be done by sanding and eye judgement. I have a pin router table and a neck shaping jig using a similar cutter just for shaping the necks, and it works well but it only gives a basic shape. You still have to refine the hand feel by sanding.
    When I use mine I remove less than 1mm per pass.

    Please be aware these large cutters can easily and quickly kill, maim, and mutilate!!! Small depth of cut EVERY TIME! BE SAFE!

    DC
     
  9. DrASATele

    DrASATele Poster Extraordinaire

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    Do you mean something like these?:
    https://sje-tools.com/13-neck-profile-router-bits
    Steve's a really nice guy. I am not affiliated I do however own a few of these bits.

    I have a couple of them, scary to use. I enjoy doing the had carving like Marty/guitarbuilder suggest in his guitar neck profile through by using facets. I got the bits to maybe speed things up somewhat but I've found that they generate enough heat while cutting that it can warp the wood. The other issue is well like I said scary. It's a huge bit and would likely take your hand if you screw up. In truth it needs a dedicated set up which I need to build, the jig I built for doing the neck profile on a router table is o.k. but you can still feel the grab of the bit and the slightest slip would likely ruin the neck and or several body parts.
    An Asian company that is on fleebay copied the fretboard radius bit that Steve sells on that site too. I have these too but I get the impression they won't last long. Steve's bits seem to be of a much higher quality than the eBay company.
     
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