Rosewood?

Discussion in 'Finely Finished' started by peteycaster, Sep 20, 2020.

  1. peteycaster

    peteycaster Tele-Holic

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    Hi all. Hope I've got the right forum. Any ideas on whether this is rosewood or not.

    Sons girlfriend picked this up off a rubbish pile (for obvious reasons). Has mother of pearl inlays and if this is a rosewood neck I might put a bit of effort in trying to reclaim it. Currently has a huge bow in the top where the bridge has pulled up so trying to get that out too. Might be wasting my time for an old classical though.

    neck1.JPG neck2.PNG

    Any ideas appreciated.

    Edit. Please excuse the spelling error in the title.
     
  2. Freeman Keller

    Freeman Keller Friend of Leo's

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    It looks like rosewood to me, if I hand to guess I would say EIR but since you have many other woods available that I'm not familiar with it is hard to say for sure. Acoustic guitar fretboard are rarely finished, depending on the condition of the frets I would probably pull them and level the board.

    Classicals have funny geometry for those of us accustom to steel string guitars, and much higher action. I just finished building a classical and with my background in steel strings it was an interesting challenge for me. What do you consider "a huge bow" on the top, remember that it should have some dome. Also, due to the much lower tension it is rare for classicals to have dramatic bridge problems, most of the time if the bridge comes loose it is because either it was left in a hot car or had steel or very high tension strings on it.

    I would be interested in seeing a straightedge on the neck pointing to the bridge and maybe some pictures of the bridge before you go any further.
     
  3. john_cribbin

    john_cribbin Tele-Afflicted

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    If it's actually a classical, the top bow is probably the result of someone using steel strings instead of nylon. Could be rosewood.
     
  4. peteycaster

    peteycaster Tele-Holic

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    Thanks for the input. The steel string scenario is what I first thought. The bridge actually has two small bolts through it. I have managed to straighten the top and put some additional bracing inside to hold it.

    Freeman, with the bridge sitting on the top and a straightedge on the fretboard the resultant action might just make this playable if I can get the saddle low enough. By the way at this stage there is no saddle as it came with a piece of plastic for a saddle and three strings!

    After a bit of sanding, the wood (although very soft and light) looks quite nice. Perhaps just a clearcoat if it's worth spending cash on. I may be able to get this playable but it might end up being just an ornament?

    Thanks again for the input.
     
  5. Freeman Keller

    Freeman Keller Friend of Leo's

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    Normally when I build a steel string I follow the old rule of thumb that the straightedge should just kiss the top of the bridge. On a classical it needs to be down a bit towards the top, maybe an 1/8 of an inch. The action on a classical is so much higher than a steel string.

    What kind of bracing does it have? I've seen the bolts thru the bridge trick a few times, it shouldn't be necessary on any acoustic, much less a classical, but people put them there anyway.
     
  6. peteycaster

    peteycaster Tele-Holic

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    I'm guessing the bolts were added after the bridge lifted as an attempt to fix the issue. The bracing inside is a flat piece of board under the bridge. I added a pine brace approx 12mm x 20mm just behind the bridge and this seems to be holding the top flatter. I've also sanded the base of the bridge as that was also warped and gummed up with glue.

    Appreciate your interest.
     
  7. Freeman Keller

    Freeman Keller Friend of Leo's

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    Sounds pretty basic. Also sounds like you have a plan, if I can help let me know. I build mostly steel strings, only two classicals to date, but I've worked on a bunch so I might be able to help.
     
  8. peteycaster

    peteycaster Tele-Holic

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    Cheers FK. Will keep that in mind.
     
  9. Vizcaster

    Vizcaster Poster Extraordinaire

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    Just a caution that you might want to try leaving the guitar in a garbage bag (or closed case if there is one) and a wet sponge for awhile to make sure the change in geometry of the top isn't the result of the hot-car treatment or other abuse. You'd be amazed how many top cracks close up and top humps change shape (although it's usually in the other direction) when re-humidified.
     
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  10. brogh

    brogh Moderator Staff Member

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    Fixed ;)

    can we have a pic of the whole ? might be worth salvaging :)
     
  11. Collin D Plonker

    Collin D Plonker Tele-Afflicted

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    Yes. Pretty sure.
     
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  12. otterhound

    otterhound Poster Extraordinaire

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    Some Classical guitar luthiers/builders will seal their wood inside and out , body included .
     
  13. peteycaster

    peteycaster Tele-Holic

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    Thanks for the repair job on the title. These are the best shots I have atm. Can't do much more with it just now as I have had a minor skin graft due to sun damage and can't get dust near it. Will post a pic later where I have started sanding prior to procedure.

    Cheers Viz, I might pop a sponge inside as you suggest. This thing has obviously been mistreated over a long time.

    Classic3.JPG Classic4.JPG

    Also not 100% sure but it might have a bone nut. Weirldy has a zero fret too.
     
  14. brogh

    brogh Moderator Staff Member

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    looks to be in good shape not as bad as one that i found ... if the neck is straight that might become a fancy classical guitar, ... top looks solid ?

    Good find, fix it :) you have another one to play with

    Cheers
     
  15. peteycaster

    peteycaster Tele-Holic

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    Pretty much "in for a penny in for a pound" at this stage. Still might end up just for looking at (the other half likes the wood colour after sanding) but we'll see how it turns out.
     
  16. peteycaster

    peteycaster Tele-Holic

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    Pics as promised.

    classic5.JPG classic6.JPG classic7.JPG
     
  17. Freeman Keller

    Freeman Keller Friend of Leo's

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    Some observations. It has classical tuners and looks to be a fairly wide fretboard, and altho the bridge is off I don't see pin holes so it must be a tie bridge. All signs of being designed for nylon. The rosette is more modern and most classicals don't have fret board dots. The stacked heel is a fairly modern construction method, can't tell enough about the head to tell if its multi piece. The heel is definitely not the traditional shape, it looks more like what you would see on a steel string. I'm guessing it might be a separate neck and heel.

    I don't see a center reinforcement on the back so I'm guessing it is laminated. The body and neck woods are looking very pale once you have finish stripped. I know that you folks have a lot of timbers that I've never seen, I won't try to guess what it is.

    The fact that it only has a bridge plate is a little disturbing, classicals only have about 80 pounds of tension but they still need some bracing. Its certainly worth what you paid for it and looks like a good project.
     
  18. Peegoo

    Peegoo Friend of Leo's

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    Looks like you're doing a very thoughtful resto on that.

    Nice work!
     
  19. Wound_Up

    Wound_Up TDPRI Member

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    Gibson put them there from the factory on more than a few guitars from what I've seen. Wouldn't put it past other mfgs.

    Here's just one example. I could post tons.

    http://www.lutherie.net/B-25_bridge.html

    [​IMG]
     
  20. Martian

    Martian Tele-Meister Gold Supporter

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    I think Luthier’s Mercantile used to sell that rosette. And the zero fret would say European build, no? Fun project.
     
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