Rory Gallagher - Walk on Hot Coals

Lone_Poor_Boy

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I don't like all of Rory's stuff, but this was really cool. I'll have to check out more of his stuff.



From Gallagher's Wiki, about the 1961 Strat he played. If this is accurate that's so damn beautiful. A family affair, and Rory closing the deal.

"Speaking about Gallagher's purchase, his brother Dónal recalled: "His dream ambition was to have a guitar like Buddy Holly. This Stratocaster was in the store as a used instrument, it was 100 pounds. In today's money you couldn't even compare; you might as well say it was a million pounds. My mother was saying we'll be in debt for the rest of our lives and Rory said, 'Well, actually with a guitar like this I can play both parts, rhythm and lead, we won't need a rhythm player so I can earn more money and pay it off.' So the Stratocaster became his partner for life if you like.""
 

MyLittleEye

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SRV just seemed like a talented copycat, Rory integrated his influences into something truly original.

Rory's influences are undoubtedly the source of his originality - Music is very much part of the Irish culture he grew up in. He may well have embraced blues subsequently but his earliest influence would be an immersion in traditional Irish music. He could play the mandolin too for instance and I've no doubt he could've sat in on any pub session and joined in on the old trad standards. The blues path he followed was perhaps an escape from that maybe?
 

MyLittleEye

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I've actually only recently discovered Rory Gallagher myself and I've been like...
"How have I missed this for so long!"

Perhaps a reason for this is also a reason I like him so much - He didn't push for stardom! He'd just get up on stage with the same old guitar and the same old clothes and get on with the music, just as if he had come from a pub jam. It's a typically Irish attitude because there, if you become a bit of a pretentious a-hole, your mates will soon let you know and bring you back down to earth.
 

tubedude

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Rory's influences are undoubtedly the source of his originality - Music is very much part of the Irish culture he grew up in. He may well have embraced blues subsequently but his earliest influence would be an immersion in traditional Irish music. He could play the mandolin too for instance and I've no doubt he could've sat in on any pub session and joined in on the old trad standards. The blues path he followed was perhaps an escape from that maybe?


I don't like all of Rory's stuff, but this was really cool. I'll have to check out more of his stuff.

I saw him at Armadillo World Headquarters in Austin around '75.
He burned the house down! The crowd was loving it so hard he did three encores. The next day I bought every cassette of his I could find. Disappointment struck, as every studio album, though filled with good tunes, had the life sucked out of it. Live he had an amazing vitality, whereas the studio recordings were cold and stodgy, likely too many takes. One exception was "Against The Grain". That album had flashes of his live energy in "Cross Me Off Your List"
"Souped Up Ford" etc.
But that night he was on fire, that '61 into the AC30's felt like they were gonna blow any minute! Best show ever.
 

John Frets

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I posted this video earlier this year, but I really like it, so ...

Here Rory is live with Jack Bruce (both of them Celts, by the way), playing Bruce’s song Politician, evidently for the first time. His playing is really great, and it is nothing like Clapton’s playing in the version by Cream.

His soloing begins at 2:52.

 

MyLittleEye

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The next day I bought every cassette of his I could find. Disappointment struck, as every studio album, though filled with good tunes, had the life sucked out of it. Live he had an amazing vitality....

I had this happen with BB King! Saw him at the Hammersmith Odeon, rushed out and got tickets to see him again at his next stop Albert Hall - awesome!
Then I rushed out and got some albums.... Meh! If I'd listened to the albums first I'd never have taken the trouble to go see him. Live was the only way!

It's great we can capture glimpses their magnificence through youtube.
 

suthol

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I posted this video earlier this year, but I really like it, so ...

Here Rory is live with Jack Bruce (both of them Celts, by the way), playing Bruce’s song Politician, evidently for the first time. His playing is really great, and it is nothing like Clapton’s playing in the version by Cream.

His soloing begins at 2:52.



Nice but that is towards the end when his health was failing and he was bloated.

I've got the full Rockapalast series and in the final couple you can see the sadness in Gerry's face while they are playing.

As for his celtic roots, the sounds and phrasing happens a lot in his playing, much in the same way as Knopfler references it in his style
 

John Frets

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Nice but that is towards the end when his health was failing and he was bloated.

I've got the full Rockapalast series and in the final couple you can see the sadness in Gerry's face while they are playing.

As for his celtic roots, the sounds and phrasing happens a lot in his playing, much in the same way as Knopfler references it in his style

That is true. It’s sad and hard to watch. He doesn’t look well, and he is not moving about as he usually did. But his playing is still great – inventive and expressive.

Gerry Rafferty (from Scotland) was another one whose music had a distinct Celtic influence.

I miss them both.
 




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