Retirement question for you all

Mike SS

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I retired last month from my career as a professional mechanic. No books, but about $8000 worth of hand tools in a six foot tall storage chest came home with me. It currently resides in my garage. If one of my son's decides to pursue a career where they would be of use to them, they are available.
 

raito

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As nearly everything in my office belonged to me personally, I packed it all up inro a box and took it home. The pens have slowly been getting used. When I finish the shelves on my bemch the Elvis On Tour 3D proster wiwll go there, as Elvis is yhe patron saint of R&D (joke from a previous job). The useful books went on the shelf with the other useful books. Empty notebooks went with the other unused paper. Not much left after that.
 

Wrighty

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Wow. Whatever that anger is coming from, you may want to seek help in letting it go. Professional salespeople are what keeps the wheels going around.

Manuals to convince someone to buy things they don't want or need. Anyone in sales that followed this guy were ripoff artists and conmen.

As an ex professional sales guy I can honestly say that those who sold people what they didn't need, in some cases even if they wanted it, never lasted the course. Even the most gullible buyer eventually works out that they've wasted money. Repeat sales based on honest advice is what generally keeps you in a job. Sold ice to an Eskimo? Big deal, you'll never sell to him again.
 

Stubee

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I kept a most of my books but I also only had a few books in my office and none were for display. We recently moved to a new house so I whittled my books down a bit, but still have one of my early boss’s chemistry books and some others. Most marketing & management books are gone because I’ll never look at them again.

The one truly exceptional book I kept is a nice illustrated copy of “Endurance” a book I’ve read several times. All group leaders etc received that book as I suppose some “inspiration” when we became part of a new internal business venture. I could tell pretty quickly that my own manager had never opened it up; his loss!

I do have a box of certificates, awards etc but they are really just there to keep my folder full of old jokes and stuff company. I worked at a great company back then.
 

P Thought

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One of the many luxurious job spiffs for teachers is that their classrooms are blank slates for personal expression. I always enjoyed visiting other teachers in their classrooms, and I tried to keep mine an interesting place to be, for myself, the kids, and any others who might come to visit. Mine was full of guitars, knickknacks, records, posters and other wall decorations, and books, at least a couple thousand books.

The last ten years of my teaching career, my classroom had almost exactly the same square footage as my house had, and walls half again as tall. I went in early and stayed late, kept my room open to everyone at lunch time. The place was very much my man-cave outside of class time.

My last year, I gave away everything I could to students, and doled out prized furnishings--my Pirate-painted podium, big glass-top desk, some carousel bookstands, several big and small library bookcases--to colleagues at the end of the year. I gave away at least 200 ties, books, a few instruments and a couple amps, loads of bric-a-brac. . . .

I came home with I think 3 guitars, one rug, the swivel desk chair I stole personally from a storage room at college, all my LPs, a couple crates of personal papers, a few artifacts from my parents, both of whom had lately died, and two boxes of books. One fellow English teacher took all that was left of my big collection of paperback fiction. I left everything else; the custodians promised they'd "take care of it", and I trust that they did.

I don't regret not bringing them home, there's really no place to put them, but I wish I'd taken pictures of my collection of paperback fiction before I dismantled it. I had each book labeled, with a Sharpie on the bottom edge, with the year it was first published, and the books were arranged chronologically on four big library bookcases. It formed a really cool timeline, starting with (I forget) maybe Gilgamesh, through the 18th, 19th, and 20th centuries, with only the last two shelves containing titles past 1990. For almost 25 years I kept my daily reading habit going, and several other people's too, with books from those shelves.

School seems like a faraway planet to me now, and I have plenty stuff to clog up my house. I should have left even more behind.
 
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schmee

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I was into Aero Manufacturing most my career. Tool designer>Engineer>Manager> VP. I semi retired at 50 and went sailing. Then did some consulting off and on. Officially retired at 65.
I have manufacturing and business books etc, but no one wants them. Actually I have tons of fiction books I've read also. It's hard to get rid of them.
 

Deeve

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This is coming in hot - retirement.
I'm looking at shelves of books on orthopedics & injury rehab as well as legal strategy.
Even though they are old, most of the muscle & bone stuff hasn't changed.
Hard to convince a new physical therapist or lawyer of its value, though.
Will probably go into the bin.
The one item I'm having the hardest time finding a new home for is the early 1950s Blacks Law Dictionary my dad (also a trial lawyer) passed on to me.
I haven't opened it in more than 15 years - it's just there as a reminder.
Like has been said - most of what I actually use is "in my head"

Peace - Deeve
 

teleman1

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Wow. Whatever that anger is coming from, you may want to seek help in letting it go. Professional salespeople are what keeps the wheels going around.
Wow, I have been in sales for 40 years, never had to use demeaning tactics to sell a product. It works for the car industry and the like and I see the need in that industry. No anger, I have been to ZIG & others including that OG guy. If you enjoy and can use their methods, more power to ya.
 

Flat6Driver

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Never destroy a book...........................but, they're not much revered by the smart 'phone Wikipedia generation. Pity, a book is more than the sum of it's parts and just so tactile.


A guy on another forum who owned a used book shop told me once that many books aren't worth the paper they are printed on. In a lot of cases I'd have to agree. Even the library throws out books.


Theres a used book shop I've been too. They have hundreds of old cook books, diet fad books, pop psychology books. All things that have passed in interest. Others are just bad ideas in physical form.

I was always told to treasure books and have a hard time disposing of them myself but there are some like the ones "written" by a consulting company and "priced" at $24.95 to get under the ethics rules...they are given away at trade conferences as a long advertisement. Ive got a few myself.

Curious turn this thread had from the drop, that wasn't my intent however.
 

Flat6Driver

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This is coming in hot - retirement.
I'm looking at shelves of books on orthopedics & injury rehab as well as legal strategy.
Even though they are old, most of the muscle & bone stuff hasn't changed.
Hard to convince a new physical therapist or lawyer of its value, though.
Will probably go into the bin.
The one item I'm having the hardest time finding a new home for is the early 1950s Blacks Law Dictionary my dad (also a trial lawyer) passed on to me.
I haven't opened it in more than 15 years - it's just there as a reminder.
Like has been said - most of what I actually use is "in my head"

Peace - Deeve


When they remodeled the old courthouse, all those fancy law books (that cost a fortune) went into the dumpster. (People use LexisNexis now). Someone snapped up a bunch cause they make good decor for model homes, university bars and the like.
 

JL_LI

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I was 70 when I retired. I took hand tools I have a use for home with me. I also took Japanese drawing tools home that were given to me by a Japanese engineer who helped me transition into engineering. I saved copies of my publications. It’s funny that knowing what I know now that I didn’t know then, I’d rewrite all of them.

I left reference texts behind. I distributed optical tools to those who could make the best use of them. Company awards and accolades all went into the dumpster as did my employee handbook and documentation from all the useless HR workshops I was forced to attend. I shredded all confidential documents in my possession, especially documents referring to others.

I archived data and made sure it was accessible to my successor. I completed all projects I was working on.

I didn’t take any vacation in 2020 so I took a check for the ten days I was entitled to. I spaced my other vacation and personal days through November and early December and worked during the time around the holidays so the people I managed could have time off.

I left personal contact info with a few colleagues in case questions arose. From the day I closed the door behind me, I never looked back. I have no intention of working as an employee ever again. I keep in touch with friends but that’s where it ends.

I’m trying to regain my health in retirement. I did a major renovation at home. The last of the furniture was delivered just this morning. I got two new BMW’s, one on a lease and a Z4 that probably won’t be available too much longer so I bought it as a gift for my wife. I hope to resume traveling as the world emerges from lockdown.

Oh, one more thing. Now that I’m retired, every day is Saturday.
 

teleman1

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Wow! Who is (was?) Zig Ziegler?
Zig ziglar wrote books and did speaking tours to any organization that had sales, from 2 man operations to corporations. He was all ra ra and poised different situations for a salesman to be in and over come every objections. Like, I know your Dad just died and your behind in your house payment and your wife is divorcing you, but you need this new Kirby vacuum with all of its attachments. If you don't have it, you could die tomorrow. I was forced to go by a company I worked for, more like a fanatic religious proselyting event. The dude is selling books, tapes, seminars and when you count all of the seats in the stadium at a few bucks a pop, you know why the guy is there. He is making rock star money to sell his sizzle steak philosophy. Lots of the public are suckers for this aggressive style and I am sure it helps the economy roll a bit more. But as Pt Barnum said
 

PCollen

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I work at a research lab. We are mostly all engineers. Most people have shelves of books, some from college, some more recent. When someone retires I usually see a pile of books set out in a common area with a sign saying take what you want. I will always take something relevant to me. Now I have a huge stash that I don’t know what to do with when I retire. I will probably give most away, but keep some of the more useful ones in case I decide to consult afterwards.

At retirement, I donated a lot of my old technical and business books to the local library.
 

P Thought

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Just remembered, I also brought home four or five thumb-drives on lanyards. I don't remember what's on them exactly, but there's a large mixture of personal and professional writing, classroom documents, presentations, and photographs. I keep meaning to go through them, save the stuff I wanted to keep, lose the duplicate files, and the ones that weren't mine to keep in the first place. Wonder if I ever will.
 

charlie chitlin

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I have very little savings and no pension.
I will retire feet first.
Luckily Mama Chitlin is almost 30 years my junior and has promised to find a way to support me in my dotage.
 




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