Restore Old Machinist Tools?

Discussion in 'The DIY Tool Shed' started by WrayGun, Sep 21, 2019.

  1. WrayGun

    WrayGun Tele-Afflicted

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    Before he left us for that big machine shop in the sky, my father-in-law gave me his old machinists toolbox, and some various tools. The first one I believe is called a micrometer; the second one I have no clue what it is.

    So I’m hoping one of you can educate me! Is there any way to restore, or at least clean up the micrometer so that I’d be able to read it? I don’t want to make it worse, or ruin it.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    The other one, can someone tell me what it is?
    [​IMG]

    And finally, here’s the awesome toolbox itself. I’m using it for all my guitar fixing tools, naturally.
    [​IMG]


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
    Last edited: Sep 21, 2019
  2. 4pickupguy

    4pickupguy Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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    Just beautiful. Kennedy used to make wooden machinist boxes. I'll lookem' up.........

    .... nope just those ugly brown crinkle finish things. Gerstner still makes them.
     
    Last edited: Sep 21, 2019
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  3. Ricky D.

    Ricky D. Doctor of Teleocity

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    Those micrometers are pretty far gone with corrosion and pitting. You could maybe improve them somewhat with a good cleaning (solvent, toothbrush), but that kind of damage is a one way street.

    That third picture is a clamp.

    Love that tool box.
     
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  4. archetype

    archetype Fiend of Leo's

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    The second pic is a machinist’s clamp. The jaws can clamp parallel or at an angle. I’d just buff the surfaces of everything with the finest polishing compound on the softest buffing wheel you can fit on a Dremel. The old tools of non-stainless steel all pit and rust if they’ve not in use and aren’t stored in a way that retards rust. You can’t really “restore” that mic, but you can clean it up, adjust it with a mic spanner to measure a 1” standard properly, and have a usable mic that’s probably accurate to +/- .001”...unless it’s been really abused.

    Enjoy your FIL’s Kennedy box full of tools (and probably custom-made things no one can identify).
     
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  5. Mike_LA

    Mike_LA Tele-Afflicted

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    The best example of tool restoration

    Ox Tools
     
  6. kingofdogs1950

    kingofdogs1950 Tele-Holic

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    I've bought old machinist's tool boxes a couple of times at garage sales. For $5 and $10 respectively, both full of tools.
    Some of the tools I've used a lot over the years. Some not all. Some, WTF is this tool?
    In both cases the owner's adult kits were selling off all the stuff of a household that was being closed up.
    Great deal for me. I still have both Kennedy boxes. Old but still work perfectly. The boxes (and tools) are pretty expensive now.

    Mark
     
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  7. telemnemonics

    telemnemonics Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    I'd leave that micrometer as a memento but it could be cleaned up if it still turns fairly freely.
    I have a lot of them and they are cheap because once old they don't get calibrated so are not useful to a machinist.
    I think I have them as old as 19th C that still work, usually they are kept dry and oiled.
    The toolboxes are always worth some money, whether Kennedy or if earlier wood case numerous brands.
    The wood cased versions might bring a few hundred $$ where the steel under $100, but I like the steel fine as well.

    If the micrometer closes down check it on a few strings.
    If it can read .009 or .010 and .013 etc then it can be useful to you..
    If it doesn't turn the threads will probably never measure accurately even if you get it freed up.
     
  8. jvin248

    jvin248 Poster Extraordinaire

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    Soak the micrometer in kerosene for several days, not wd40. rag wipe it off and work it. Then lightly oil. work it. check accuracy.

    The black patina will protect it from further red rust. so don't go too crazy with polish. store it wrapped in a rag that is oiled some.

    .
     
  9. old wrench

    old wrench Tele-Afflicted

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    The clamp is a machinist parallel clamp and the the tool box looks like it may be Gerstner. It will most likely be labeled as such if it is a Gerstner.

    Gerstner is still in business, and if I'm not mistaken, they still do repairs and restoration on their old boxes. On the Gerstners, the stuff that shows is oak, and I'm pretty sure that the drawer sides ,backs and bottoms (everything other than the faces) are poplar.

    A good micrometer is quite a bit more accurate than the calipers that are in common use. I stick with micrometers for measurements on my engine work where accuracy of a thousanth or even a ten thousanth is pretty routine :).

    Calibrated blocks are available for checking micrometers accuracy.




    g
     
    Last edited: Sep 21, 2019
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  10. Count

    Count Friend of Leo's

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    Just as a bit of trivia Machinists or Engineers Cramps used to be a standard apprentice test piece for Fitters and Turners (Metal bench work and machining) The screws had to be made on a Lathe, the Jaws and retaining clip had all to be made using hand tools only. Accuracy of the finished tool was determined by putting engineers blue on the inner surface of one jaw and then closing the jaws. Upon opening the jaw that had been left unblued had to have an even coating of blue on it for at least 95% of the jaw. I am happy to boast that mine got passed at first attempt.:)
    If you soak the Micrometer in WD 40 for a few days it may be able to be rescued as a usable micrometer.
     
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  11. trev333

    trev333 Telefied Ad Free Member

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    We had one of those clamps in our workshop at home... made by my older bro at high school or apprentice tech school... he was a sparky though.... ;)
     
  12. Axis29

    Axis29 Poster Extraordinaire Ad Free Member

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    I have several (tens of, maybe?) older tools in worse shape, that I have rescued. Luckily, my set if micrometers (that I inherited as well) was not a victim of the humidity back East. At the same time, a micrometer is not something I use very often. So, it still has it's original felt lined case, that looks a little rough on the outside, brand new on the inside! LOL

    I have several combination squares, a number of sets of pliers, chisels and goodness knows what else I've restored over the years. I've never settled on a single method. But, I tend to hit things with the lightest solution first... I like the suggestion of soaking in Kerosene. But, even afterwards, I'd tend to do a bit of polishing, so I could read the numbers. I tend to also wax things afterwards to try and add a little protection. Boeshield T-9 goes on something if it sees regular duty.
     
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  13. muchxs

    muchxs Doctor of Teleocity

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    Bah! Lap the measuring surfaces. Re- set zero. Good to go.


    After finding old guitar amplifiers, handmade quilts. pork pie hats and vintage leather jackets in our local open pit dump I thought the fun would be over when it closed.

    Found a Starrett micrometer in its original box perched daintily on top of the scrap metal container at the transfer station.

    :cool: :cool: :cool:

    Found a 12" Jensen speaker complete with the L.A. fire marshall's sticker in the same container a few years ago.

    :cool:
     
  14. telemnemonics

    telemnemonics Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    I was sad to see the old dump close but also find the new transfer station is great, though it seems all the guys that work there are hoarders so the stuff gets picked over before I get to it.
    They leave lots of stuff by the metal can for locals to shop before throwing it in if there are no takers.
    Some stuff they put right in the garage, and the town has gone wealthy over the last 30 years so good stuff gets tossed all the time.
    Poor Mainers don't toss good stuff!
    Sits in the yard until it's o longer any good...
     
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  15. schmee

    schmee Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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    Soak the mic in some oily solvent as mentioned. If it wont clean up the rust after rubbing, you can use Naval Jelly for that but it may make the chrome finish more satin.
     
  16. telemnemonics

    telemnemonics Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    CB47BD3C-0706-439B-B47A-5F9E129B87BB.jpeg Here’s a few of my micrometers I could find on short notice, I have at least this many squirreled away in places I’d reach for one like mixed in with purpose sorted tool piles on workbenches.

    The one in front with the measuring threads showing has to be over 100 years old and is still reasonably accurate, and the one next to t with the inspection sticker is probably the newest of them, the rod clamped on the dumb end is for measuring wall thickness of tubing. There is a small micrometer for measuring the ID of a tube or cylinder, and two for depth measurement.
    I use the depth micrometers or measuring tip opening of Sax mouthpieces and for checking when refacing them.
     
  17. muchxs

    muchxs Doctor of Teleocity

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    Got a 12 gauge Mossberg 500 pump shotgun out of the scrap container a few years back. It's missing parts. Still, the receiver is intact so it's a gun as far as the ATF is concerned.
     
  18. telemnemonics

    telemnemonics Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    Oops!

    But, is the ATF even allowed into your home state?
    In Maine you can walk into Starbucks with your Colt on your hip and your Winchester in your paw.
    My town though we can't actually shoot...

    Cept at the transfer station shooting range!
     
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  19. muchxs

    muchxs Doctor of Teleocity

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    Just tossed it out there, found a shotgun in the dumpster. Not intended to promote discussion...

    :cool:
     
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  20. Guitarteach

    Guitarteach Poster Extraordinaire

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    There are some stunning tool restorations on YouTube.. dismantle, long soak in vinegar to react off the rust, good clean..
     
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