Resonators!

Discussion in 'Guitar Owners Clubs' started by Flaneur, Dec 5, 2010.

  1. Tarnisher

    Tarnisher Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    2,501
    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2008
    Location:
    Brooklyn
    That's possible, but Gretsch says their cones are handspun in Europe.
     
  2. absurdocaster

    absurdocaster Tele-Meister

    Posts:
    218
    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2013
    Location:
    Calgary, Canada
    That is true as well. Many of the manufacturers like Gretsch, Epiphone, Republic and the like manufacture the actual guitar in China and source the cones from Eastern Europe. Such is the nature of the global economy. Get the parts you need from the best place and manufacture where the costs are best.
     
  3. absurdocaster

    absurdocaster Tele-Meister

    Posts:
    218
    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2013
    Location:
    Calgary, Canada
    I hear ya. The Gretsch's are beautiful and I was seriously considering one myself until I found myself in Memphis on a business trip and made my way to the Gibson factory for a tour. I knew I couldn't afford a Gibson (or the National I really want some day) at the time but I really wanted a guitar to commemorate my trip to my musical Mecca (Memphis not the Gibson Plant). So I found myself in the Gibson store and low and behold they had a resonator and I had been lusting for one. So what was a fella to do? Needless to say it followed me home. Now I have a little memento (even through it is not manufactured there) that allows me to play some blues when I get all misty about Beale Street.

    I still covet the Gretsch models whenever I am in my local shop. Gotta love the pearl head stocks!

    I'm considering putting a bucker on mine too. Any advice?
     
  4. Gearhead88

    Gearhead88 Tele-Holic

    Posts:
    651
    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2012
    Location:
    Alberta
    I went with a Lace ultra slim on my Dean resonator , which is a steel body , there is an adhesive pad on the back of the pickup , I did not want to saw a hole to flush mount the pickup. I did drill holes for volume , tone pots and the output jack. If I was doing another one , I'd just buy the National hot plate kit . The National Hot plate kit may not be the correct fit for some guitars , it could be a modification that may be added to a cover plate you already have , using components that you choose , then install in your cover.

    http://www.lacemusic.com/USA_Acoustic.php

    http://store.nationalguitars.com/hot-plate.aspx

    I should say , On my Dean , It will feed back , you can prevent or control it by not standing too close to the amp , being aware of body position in relation to the amp or by a subtle palm mute at the onset of feedback .

    Your guitar is wood bodied ? , plan carefully , talk to the tech you like to use for repairs n' stuff , see what he suggests too .

    Here's that Dean.......

    [​IMG]
     
  5. PaulStrattele

    PaulStrattele Tele-Holic

    Posts:
    789
    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2013
    Location:
    WNC
    I've got an FR48 but yours looks showroom ready. I was never able to keep mine looking clean.
     
  6. Tonemonkey

    Tonemonkey Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    8,056
    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2008
    Location:
    Back in South of England !!
    .
    .
    .
    .
     

    Attached Files:

    • LOSE.jpg
      LOSE.jpg
      File size:
      30.3 KB
      Views:
      104
  7. straightface

    straightface Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    2,444
    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2006
    Location:
    MA
    Is converting a righty resonator to lefty as simple as a new nut? I'm guessing the bridge won't be an issue but it certainly won't be the first or last time I've guessed wrong. Anybody done this before?
     
  8. Tarnisher

    Tarnisher Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    2,501
    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2008
    Location:
    Brooklyn
    Congratulations! I have a fantasy of retiring to a mountain tourist town and opening a music shop to cater to folks who want to buy an instrument while on vacation. There's just something sweet about coming back from a trip with a new guitar that you didn't plan on.

    As for a 'bucker, I put a Seymour Duncan Little '59 in mine, and I couldn't be happier. I got the idea from a guy who did the same with his Alligator and posted about it on the Gretsch forum. He did it himself, and it sounded like a it was a lot of work for a non-pro to get right. I decided to take mine to my trusted tech, a luthier who handbuilds archtops. He had no problems installing it. Oh, and I used the Triple Shot ring, so I can get four distinct sounds, all of which I use in different settings.

    If you think about it, it's kind of strange that more people don't put electric pickups in these things. I mean, there's this space right there that you can cut without affecting the acoustic tone, and then you have a guitar that's equal parts electric and acoustic. I've hardly touched my archtop since I got it. Heck, I've hardly touched any of my other guitars!
     
  9. Tarnisher

    Tarnisher Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    2,501
    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2008
    Location:
    Brooklyn
    Oh yeah, pics, please!
     
  10. LGOberean

    LGOberean Doctor of Teleocity

    Age:
    66
    Posts:
    11,107
    Joined:
    May 31, 2008
    Location:
    Corpus Christi, Texas
    Thanks for the reference to Michael Messer and his website. I've just been checking it out.
     
  11. boniholmes

    boniholmes Tele-Meister

    Posts:
    284
    Joined:
    May 5, 2013
    Location:
    Hungarian Empire
    New owner

    Sign me up, hearties. Ozark 3615 Deluxe:
    [​IMG]
     
  12. SynMike

    SynMike Tele-Meister

    Posts:
    498
    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2013
    Location:
    Vancouver BC
    Johnson Resonator

    [​IMG]
     
  13. LGOberean

    LGOberean Doctor of Teleocity

    Age:
    66
    Posts:
    11,107
    Joined:
    May 31, 2008
    Location:
    Corpus Christi, Texas
    Anyone have some suggested recordings, or better yet, videos, of playing a reso fingerstyle? As I've said before, I'm not much of a slide player, and while I want to improve in that area, it probably won't be the biggest part of what I play. So a resonator would have to do double duty.

    Also related to that first question, should I look for a reso with a wooden body or metal one since I'm looking to play different styles on it?
     
  14. Alex W

    Alex W Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    3,191
    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2003
    Location:
    In my tube amp coccoon.
    One famous recording of a reso played fingerstyle is "Romeo and Juliet" by Dire Straits.



    FWIW that's a metal bodied resonator in the Dire Straits song. I have a wood bodied National myself. I like the sound of either. The wood body is slightly less bright although it remains a very bright sound compared to a regular acoustic guitar. I find the wood body to be a little more forgiving by softening up the attack a little. Another player might prefer a metal body depending on the sound they were after. Another benefit of the wood body is that it tends to be lighter. Also, in the wintertime a metal body is COLD when you pick it up.

    There are different metals to choose from if you go for a metal body. There is plain steel, plain brass, nickel plated brass, and german silver. I can't say much about the tonal differences but someone else might be able to comment on that.
     
  15. Tommy Biggs

    Tommy Biggs Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    2,262
    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2010
    Location:
    Northern NJ
    I'd suggest wood body from your criteria.

    I have played slide since I first started playing a million years ago (well, 1975-ish). I didn't know anything, and it seemed cool - so I just tried it, and kept at it.
    I dreamed of a National forever. I saved up for years, and would play on 'donated' guitars - mile high action old acoustics that somebody someplace no longer wanted.

    Finally, I went to Mandolin Bros and bought a 14 Fret Model 0, which I love. They can be frighteningly bold. My reaction when I first tried it out was "Oh dear" and I think I really preferred the sweetness of the wood bodies. But I stuck to my guns and worked through it. It's a great sound (although it does not have that "Johnny Winter Trash Can" tone that I love. Listen to the Muddy Waters Hard Again album).



    The Model O isn't that great for finger picking acoustically for me.
    I guess I would suggest trying some if you can - Steel and Brass, Maple and Spruce tops. Check http://www.resohangout.com/ too...

    Good luck!
     
  16. Obsessed

    Obsessed Telefied Ad Free Member

    Posts:
    23,259
    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2012
    Location:
    Montana
    I was wondering if there was a reso thread here in the Guitar Club section. As my interest in getting a resonator guitar grows (I played about a dozen different ones on my trip to the Oregon coast last month), I'm trying to zero in on what to get vs. budget. I was wondering if anyone here has or at least some experience with the relatively new Gretsch Roots Collection G9202 Honey Dipper and/or Special? My interest is finger picking/slide blues instead of bluegrass and this one seems to float to the top from reviews, tone and price, but unfortunately I didn't see one on my trip.

    Any input would be greatly appreciated. I'm not in a hurry and basically fishing right now, because first, I probably need to decide which one in the my electrics stable needs to go on the auction block and I'm in the midst of expanding my fingerpickin' slide repertoire.
     
  17. Tonemonkey

    Tonemonkey Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    8,056
    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2008
    Location:
    Back in South of England !!
    ^^^

    I have a Regal RC-2 ..... Which is a hunk o' resonator!

    After buying the RC-2 off a mate, I tried a Honeydipper in a local store, and was most impressed. I found it more like a traditional acoustic in neck feel, lighter, easier to play, and slightly less edgy. I liked it, but it comes down to the sound you want.

    I kind of miss that Honeydipper ...!
     
  18. Obsessed

    Obsessed Telefied Ad Free Member

    Posts:
    23,259
    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2012
    Location:
    Montana
    Hey thanks and good to know. I liked the playability of a Regal RC-30 wood resonator the most of the ones I tried, but the Regal Tri-cone seemed almost unplayable. I think primarily because the action was very high. So the RC-2 Duolian was another top consideration, but the tri-cone made me aware of how different each one plays. I like your term "edgy" for comparison sake, because the tricones that I did play, all seemed too edgy for me, but maybe I just can't play them well enough yet. :rolleyes:
     
  19. Tonemonkey

    Tonemonkey Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    8,056
    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2008
    Location:
    Back in South of England !!

    Cool; for me the Honeydipper was easier to play (more forgiving) than my RC-2. I play thumbpick and finger style RJ and Rev Wilkins stuff on Resonator.

    From our "chat" I'd say give it a roll, with a GC/Sweetwater return deal, even if it's not "the one" (actual guitar) you'll know if it's a model to rule out for you. I think you'll like it.

    Good Luck
     
  20. scantron81

    scantron81 Tele-Afflicted

    Posts:
    1,794
    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2009
    Location:
    Georgia
    I sold my nicke tricone. I have my eye on a honeydipper. I like Rhodes of a slightly smaller body and lighter weight.
     
IMPORTANT: Treat everyone here with respect, no matter how difficult!
No sex, drug, political, religion or hate discussion permitted here.


  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.