Reranch???

Tezuka27

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Apr 11, 2011
Posts
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Location
Eastern Iowa
Does anyone know if reranch is coming back? I've been waiting for over a year to get some more ice blue metallic to finish up a Tele for a friend, but I'm about ready to sand it down to wood and try to find another brand. Any info on what's up with them or recommendations on alternates is greatly appreciated.

John b.
 

Steve Holt

Friend of Leo's
Joined
May 29, 2016
Posts
3,398
Location
Kansas

I used Gracey's for some shell pink once when Reranch was closed. Worked fine.

Reranch has been really hit or miss for the last couple years. I've used their products for a over a decade now. I ordered a can of Fiesta red awhile back and it was REALLY orange. Way different than what I thought of as Fiesta red. I sent an email asking about it they basically said "nope that's Fiesta" - I still disagree. They did send me a new can at my request but it was the same shade of orange from the same batch :(

Fortunately I had just enough leftover in an old can that I was able to paint my little guitar.
 

RodeoTex

Doctor of Teleocity
Joined
Sep 14, 2005
Posts
12,084
Location
Uvalde, Tx
No news about Reranch but I agree their accuracy has been off.
The Fiesta Red I got was more pink than anything.
The Goldtop gold I got was just flesh colored with no metallic at all.

Duplicolor's Avignon Blue is a good substitute for Ice Blue Metallic.
 

Silverface

Doctor of Teleocity
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Do they not answer emails? I don't use any aerosols but have steered many total beginners there. The website is open.

Are the not filling orders? Do they answer emails?
 

oregomike

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Joined
Mar 28, 2019
Posts
1,564
Location
Hood River, OR
Does anyone know if reranch is coming back? I've been waiting for over a year to get some more ice blue metallic to finish up a Tele for a friend, but I'm about ready to sand it down to wood and try to find another brand. Any info on what's up with them or recommendations on alternates is greatly appreciated.

John b.
I gave up on them a while ago. Just can't count on them. Went to Gracey's and not looking back.
 

Tezuka27

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Apr 11, 2011
Posts
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Location
Eastern Iowa
Thanks for the info, guys. I've been checking their site a couple of times a week for the last year and have never been able to place an order. I looked up the 1965 Ford code numbers for the paint and here they if anyone needs them.

1965 Silver Blue
Ford Paint Code “Y”
Dupont Color Number – 4692
PPG Color Number – 12164
Ditzler Color Number - 13045

Cheers,
John b.
 

Tezuka27

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Posts
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Location
Eastern Iowa
Just checked out graceys and it looks like they're offering just about everything that reranch did. Ordered 2 cans of ice blue metallic and five cans of clear. I look forward to trying it out.
John b.
 

Wyatt

Tele-Afflicted
Joined
Nov 3, 2004
Posts
1,299
Do they not answer emails? I don't use any aerosols but have steered many total beginners there. The website is open.

Are the not filling orders? Do they answer emails?

According to a post, the owners were at high risk for COVID, so they went into isolation during the early pandemic, then their vendor had supply chains issues. I think they were shipping for a short while late last Summer, but that was it. I don't think they've had any present in their forum for nearly a year (note: I have not checked recently).

As back in the days when he used to go on tour, the site is up, the store is up, but you can't order.
 

Silverface

Doctor of Teleocity
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According to a post, the owners were at high risk for COVID,
Seems odd for a mail order business. But I knew some folks who were really freaked out early in the pandemic.

At least their site is still up for info. Makes it tough for newbies to get classic Fender colors, but honestly I have seen few "reissue" - type colors sprayed realistically with aerosols.

And Mohawk has a ton of toner and "enamel " (their term for "opaque") colors that are pretty darned close to many of them.

I still think aerosols are a "learning tool" and a great small job/touch up tool - but to get them right (especially the semi-transparents) takes the control you get with a real HVLP (turbine powered and spraying at a maximum of 4-10psi) - or traditional air spray, which is a really mess because of the overspray and fumes. A good non-bleeder (the air being triggered WITH the material - which is not the $130 cheapos) can be found at local contractor paint stores (NOT Home Depot) - where you can also get proper training - for $400 or less.

I've seen newbies burn through $3-400 of material just trying to get a handle on things, stripping and starting over (instead of properly doing practice applications repeatedly on SCRAP until they get it right!)

Lacquer work is not that difficult. It takes:
1. the right location (clean with good ventilation)
2. Proper safety equipment - a cartridge respirator that's been FIT TESTED at the point of sale, with the right carts and prefilters; and full-coverage goggles.
3. The right equipment. No, a pancake compressor and a gun stamped "HVLP" DOES NOT mean you are spraying "HVLP". You need 15-26 CFM of air (which is, in technical terms, "a metric 💩-load of air") to spray at 4-10psi at the air cap.

That takes one BIG compressor and a non-bleeder gun that can even spray at 4-10 PSI. Which cheap ones can't.

After 40 years of trying dozens of rigs, a turbine based system is inexpensive, compact, and does a great job. Large compressor jobs are generally used in professional industrial projects with multiple gun rigs.
4. The right materials - ALL of them, before you start the job. If you are not sure what you need, you are not ready. Sealers, primers, fillers, dyes, stains, color coats, toners and clear coats.
5. NO sandpaper. It is only used to fix tiny runs. There is NEVER "finish sanding". If it's needed the job is a trainwreck and needs to be restarted. Done right, you go from clear coat to vertical buffing wheel(not a swirly "car wax buffer").
6.PRACTICE. don't TOUCH the guitar except to make sure it's what you ordered. Then put it away.
Prepare similar scrap wood and apply the entire system until you get it right. If you mess up - ask questions, fix it, or strip it and start over. NEVER have the need to ask "what's the next coat?" or "what product do I use now?". That is all information you have written down on a procedures sheet before you start - TO PRACTICE.
If you screw up - you need more practice. And you don't know until you buff out the light orange peel and see what you have.
If it's "close" - do another practice run! Don't touch that guitar until you know what you're doing!

The single most common cause for failure among inexperienced lacquer applicators is IMPATIENCE!

Memorize that last line.
 

Southpaw Tele

Friend of Leo's
Joined
Jun 30, 2008
Posts
2,839
Age
49
Location
The Golden State
I've had some good results recently with Oxford Guitar Supply after watch Brad Angove on youtube demo their stuff - pretty great service and everything is available in rattle cans plus half pint paint cans for those of use using spray guns
www.oxfordguitarsupply.com
I bought some Oxford Fiesta Red. It’s a little too red (not enough orange) but high quality stuff and I’d use them again.
 

Wheelhouse

Tele-Meister
Joined
Mar 5, 2021
Posts
313
Location
WI
Seems odd for a mail order business. But I knew some folks who were really freaked out early in the pandemic.

At least their site is still up for info. Makes it tough for newbies to get classic Fender colors, but honestly I have seen few "reissue" - type colors sprayed realistically with aerosols.

And Mohawk has a ton of toner and "enamel " (their term for "opaque") colors that are pretty darned close to many of them.

I still think aerosols are a "learning tool" and a great small job/touch up tool - but to get them right (especially the semi-transparents) takes the control you get with a real HVLP (turbine powered and spraying at a maximum of 4-10psi) - or traditional air spray, which is a really mess because of the overspray and fumes. A good non-bleeder (the air being triggered WITH the material - which is not the $130 cheapos) can be found at local contractor paint stores (NOT Home Depot) - where you can also get proper training - for $400 or less.

I've seen newbies burn through $3-400 of material just trying to get a handle on things, stripping and starting over (instead of properly doing practice applications repeatedly on SCRAP until they get it right!)

Lacquer work is not that difficult. It takes:
1. the right location (clean with good ventilation)
2. Proper safety equipment - a cartridge respirator that's been FIT TESTED at the point of sale, with the right carts and prefilters; and full-coverage goggles.
3. The right equipment. No, a pancake compressor and a gun stamped "HVLP" DOES NOT mean you are spraying "HVLP". You need 15-26 CFM of air (which is, in technical terms, "a metric 💩-load of air") to spray at 4-10psi at the air cap.

That takes one BIG compressor and a non-bleeder gun that can even spray at 4-10 PSI. Which cheap ones can't.

After 40 years of trying dozens of rigs, a turbine based system is inexpensive, compact, and does a great job. Large compressor jobs are generally used in professional industrial projects with multiple gun rigs.
4. The right materials - ALL of them, before you start the job. If you are not sure what you need, you are not ready. Sealers, primers, fillers, dyes, stains, color coats, toners and clear coats.
5. NO sandpaper. It is only used to fix tiny runs. There is NEVER "finish sanding". If it's needed the job is a trainwreck and needs to be restarted. Done right, you go from clear coat to vertical buffing wheel(not a swirly "car wax buffer").
6.PRACTICE. don't TOUCH the guitar except to make sure it's what you ordered. Then put it away.
Prepare similar scrap wood and apply the entire system until you get it right. If you mess up - ask questions, fix it, or strip it and start over. NEVER have the need to ask "what's the next coat?" or "what product do I use now?". That is all information you have written down on a procedures sheet before you start - TO PRACTICE.
If you screw up - you need more practice. And you don't know until you buff out the light orange peel and see what you have.
If it's "close" - do another practice run! Don't touch that guitar until you know what you're doing!

The single most common cause for failure among inexperienced lacquer applicators is IMPATIENCE!

Memorize that last line.
I just want to take an aside here to say that I appreciate the recommendations @Silverface offers. I'm not a candidate for a HVLP turbine system, but I still appreciate everything said from an expert on the subject.
 

Wyatt

Tele-Afflicted
Joined
Nov 3, 2004
Posts
1,299
I bought some Oxford Fiesta Red. It’s a little too red (not enough orange) but high quality stuff and I’d use them again.

Fiesta Red is a great example of a "you can't please everyone" color. Everyone has a different idea of what an ideal Fiesta Red is. A real deal 1959 Fiesta Red probably didn't have ANY orange hue to it, it's more of a washed out red. But once the clear coat yellowed, they turned orange. So which do you match? The real paint or what people are used to seeing? Modern day Fender has a half dozen different Fiesta Reds, Mexico has used two different shades, Japan has used a few, and Corona sprays at least one shade for poly, one for nitro and another for the custom shop. The Polyester and polyurethane versions are more orange (because they won't yellow), the nitro are redder (because they will yellow with age), and the CS are just red (because the aged them with tinted clear). Same thing for something like Butterscotch Blonde, the production models get a yellow pigment...the CS get white blonde and yellow clear, like aged originals.

For things like Fiesta Red, Sea Foam Green, Ocean Turquoise, and Blonde, I prefer to have the original non-yellowed hue, then I can add as much tinted clear as I need to achieve the shade I want.

I always loved these reference blocks that Curtis Novak posted of what stock colors should look like...
 
Last edited:

Sax-son

Friend of Leo's
Joined
Mar 20, 2019
Posts
2,248
Age
70
Location
Three Rivers, CA
I loved Reranch and everything I ever got from them was great. I'm not sure is the Lawrence - McFadden bankruptcy had anything to do with it or if they are just taking some time off. However, I have been getting by using Mohawk, Gracey, StewMac, and Ohio Valley products. No problem there. I don't have many projects on the table now or in the near future, so it is not a big issue for me at this time.
 

burntfrijoles

Doctor of Teleocity
Joined
Feb 12, 2010
Posts
10,072
Location
Somewhere Over The Rainbow
Fiesta Red is a great example of a "you can't please everyone" color.
Yep. I had a Custom Classic Fiesta Red Strat that I purchased some time in the mid-late 90s. My daughter asked "why did you buy a pink guitar?" It was indeed Fiesta Red but I've seen Fiestas with much more red coloration.
It's my favorite color for a Strat.
 

Sax-son

Friend of Leo's
Joined
Mar 20, 2019
Posts
2,248
Age
70
Location
Three Rivers, CA
If I were building in large numbers, I would invest in professional equipment and build a painting booth. However, with my one here and one there approach, I couldn't justify the cost. I learned a lot from Reranch, so I am appreciative to them no matter what they are going through or have just decided to retire. They opened the door for a lot of DIYers and other cottage businesses to offer what they started. Hopefully they will come back, but if not, a huge thanks to them.
 




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