Refinishing: ? re Efficient/Best way to remove Silicone

Discussion in 'Tele-Technical' started by Ippon, Dec 30, 2007.

  1. Ippon

    Ippon Tele-Meister

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    Hello. This is my first thread in this elite forum. :)

    I volunteered to help a schoolmate re-finish his "older" Precision Bass: some dings, dents, scratches, the usual stuff that shouldn't be too challenging.

    What's challenging is that he's been polishing it with car polish that's loaded with Silicone!!! :(

    Is there a low-tech solution to eradicating all traces of Silicone?

    My preferred method would be:
    1. to use some "magic bullet" that I can wipe the body to eliminate the spawn of modern tech (Silicone)
    2. Scuff sand with 200 grit
    3. Fill the minor imperfections
    4. Prime
    5. Colorcoat
    6. Clearcoat
    7. wait 2 weeks
    8. go through the buffing/polishing with 3M Finesse It II, etc.
    Is there such a magic bullet? Or should I sand to bare wood? Or is there a combo of steps that would be more efficient?

    Thanks gents!

    :)
     
  2. daveswenson

    daveswenson TDPRI Member

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    Is there a low-tech solution to eradicating all traces of Silicone?

    No!

    But there are ways to deal with it.

    1. Remove the silicone oil using mineral spirits naphtha or special silicone remover (which is about the same thing). The problem is that you are only diluting the silicone and wiping it off. If it has soaked into the wood, it's difficult ,to remove. Use clean cloth or paper towel, wipe, turn, get a new cloth so that you are removing the silicone, not just moving it around.

    2. Seal the silicone into the wood. Use some store bought 3 pound cut shellac mixed half and half with denatured alcohol, or mix up some 1 to 2 pound cut shellac from flakes. This must be sprayed on. The shellac seals in the silicone because the alcohol is not a solvent for the oil.

    3. Use Nitrocellulose lacquer. Spray on 4 or 5 dust coats. Not enough to dissolve the oil just enough for a light coat. Then apply a heavier coat to fuse the dust coats, but not so wet that it causes the fish eye to come through.

    4.Use silicone oil in your finish to decrease the surface tension. There are several trade names, Smoothie, Fish Eye Destroyer et al. This will contaminate your spray equipment requiring a thorough cleaning.



    Here are a few threads I googled that deal with the problem on Furniture.

    http://www.woodweb.com/knowledge_base/Refinishing_contamination_problem.html
    http://www.woodweb.com/knowledge_base/Refinishing_a_SiliconeContaminated_Antique.html
    http://web1.msue.msu.edu/imp/mod02/01500448.html
    http://groups.google.com/group/rec....99597a513d3/99b5d138116332a9#99b5d138116332a9



    Good luck,
    Dave
     
  3. Ippon

    Ippon Tele-Meister

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    Thanks so much for the detailed post daveswenson.

    I read the same articles + some others and the Silicone remover/Naphtha + Shellac treatment appeared to be the most efficient. I was reluctant to go there since I haven't tried Shellac.

    This forces me to jump away from my Krylon/Duplicolor/Nitro comfort zones.

    Thanks again! :)
     
  4. daveswenson

    daveswenson TDPRI Member

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    Shellac shouldn't be any harder than Nitro. Are you using spray cans? A sprayer would be ideal. You could also try the French polish, but I'd go gently at first, so as not to spread the silicone around.

    Dave
     
  5. reddogbass

    reddogbass Tele-Holic

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    Car painters deal with this every day. A wax remover/degreaser is available from auto paint suppliers. Be sure to hit every nook and cranny. Then wash with Dawn and steel woll, followed up with alcohol wash, and another good wash down and a blow dry before any sanding or repair begins.

    A little harsh or over the top for a guitar repaint, but a scaled down version will provide the same result. Try to avoid the "fisheye removers" if at all possible.
     
  6. daveswenson

    daveswenson TDPRI Member

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    that's true, but with wood you get absorption, that you don't get with metal, making removal very difficult, therefore the best way to deal with it is to seal it in.

    Dave
     
  7. Vizcaster

    Vizcaster Poster Extraordinaire

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    I'd encourage you to try shellac. It's a perfect barrier coat and anything else will stick to it so long as it's de-waxed. You might be able to get Zinsser SealCoat in rattle cans. Otherwise it is very thin and atomizes very easily even with the most basic spray equipment like those disposable Preval gadgets. If you do have spray equipment, try using a smaller tip with the shellac.

    Depending on your finishing materials, you probably want to be scuff sanding with finer grits than "200" Bare wood you can get away with 220, but existing finish should get 320 or 400 before topcoating. Lots of luck.

    Shellac is such a good idea that I would use it for any refinishing job. It not only seals any contamination from silicone but it can also be used as a barrier to keep stain from bleeding up into the topcoats.
     
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