Recommendations for spokeshave

Discussion in 'The DIY Tool Shed' started by horseman308, Jun 23, 2016.

  1. horseman308

    horseman308 Tele-Holic

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    Hope this is the right forum section.

    I'm gonna (probably) get a spokeshave for a late father's day present for neck carving. I plan to go with a nice one, though the Lie Nielson is a but much for me. Right now I'm thinking on the Veritas options here:

    Veritas® Flat, Round and Concave Spokeshaves - Lee Valley Tools

    or

    Cast Round Spokeshave - Lee Valley Tools

    I know many people will recommend an older Stanley or Record, but if I can't find one, what do you suggest?

    Flat bottom or round?
     
  2. richa

    richa Tele-Afflicted

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    I don't personally use a spokeshave (yet). I use a Japanese Saw File and a card scrapper. But Paul Sellers has a lot of good info about sharpening and usage here. There should be lots of other articles there besides that one.

    Veritas is very highly thought of but can't give you first hand opinion as I said.
     
  3. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Silver Supporter

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    Just a thought. This won't answer your question, but you may want to consider a Farriers rasp. It is wider, easier to control your cut, and leaves a neck with fewer dips in it. I started out with a spokeshave and after using the Farrier's rasp, it just hangs there. If you are a horseman...you may already have one. That used with half round files and scrapers makes neck making so much easier.
     
  4. Davecam48

    Davecam48 Friend of Leo's Ad Free Member

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    As Marty said..............go the farriers rasp, but wear some thick gloves when using it those things also remove the meat from your hands. I use the rasp to roughly shape, and a scraper to smooth and trim.

    DC
     
  5. mudimba

    mudimba Tele-Meister Ad Free Member

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    Flat spokeshave might be my favorite tool of all I own. I've only made a couple necks, but it worked like a dream. Flat means you can use it to quickly make your facets (and it works fine on the curved parts too).
     
  6. adirondak5

    adirondak5 Wood Hoarder Extraordinaire

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    If you want to go with a spokeshave I would suggest you start off with a flat one , you can easily do facets and radius with a flat spoke shave . The little Lie Nielsen is a dream to work with

    [​IMG]
     
  7. TRexF16

    TRexF16 Friend of Leo's Vendor Member

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    The veritas is a good one. I have one, along with many old Stanleys.
    [​IMG]
    With the straight blade it is also very useful for things like strat contours.
    IMG_1570.JPG
    Rex
     
  8. John Nicholas

    John Nicholas Friend of Leo's

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    I found an old Stanley at an Antique store for $20.

    I used it already, but can't tell if I like it or not. I suppose it would be easier to tell if I sharpened it!!

    It's worth trying one... each person is different so what some my like, you may not. And of course the reverse is also true.

    Personally it doesn't seem worth too much of an investment until you find out if the spoke shave works for your style or not.

    Just my $.02
     
  9. richa

    richa Tele-Afflicted

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    Gotta say when I first read that I thought to myself "bit of a stretch don't you think?". Then I looked at the OP's handle again. Nice.

    Another question to the OP... are you already setup as far as sharpening paraphernalia? If not then its a consideration.
     
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  10. Engraver-60

    Engraver-60 Friend of Leo's

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    I bought El Cheapo's at HF, and they were total Cr@p. I ended up using my Dad's old Surform Rasp and sandpaper. Then I bought a WoodRiver Spokeshave ('cause you can never have too many tools), and it works beautifully. But - I only have made 2 necks so far. 14 blanks waiting for me to "get a round tuit".
     
  11. Robert.II

    Robert.II Tele-Meister

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    If you do go a spokeshave.... Much like others I'd suggest flat, you'll be happier. I've used spokeshaves for shaping other round things like kayak paddles, table legs, etc. I prefer using a rasp for my necks, I've made a few so far and found I had more control with a rasp.
     
  12. OpenG Capo4

    OpenG Capo4 Friend of Leo's

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    I got a HF spokeshave. Spent an afternoon leveling and sharpening the iron. It works kind of OK, I guess. I would imagine the Lie Neilsen would be great. As it is I get much, much more use out of my farrier's rasp and curved scraper.
     
  13. telemnemonics

    telemnemonics Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    Nickfl likes this.
  14. jimdkc

    jimdkc Friend of Leo's

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    I wanted to try a spokeshave without a big investment, so I bought this one a few years ago:

    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B005W0ZW3I

    It appears to be virtually identical to a Stanley 12-950 or Grizzly H8064. It took some practice and some adjustments, but once I got both the spokeshave and the technique dialed in, I liked it quite well!

    That said, my #1 tool for neck shaping is still a Surform (although I'm going to try a farrier's rasp next time I carve a neck!)
     
  15. Vizcaster

    Vizcaster Poster Extraordinaire

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    I have a set that needed quite a bit of tuneup (remember Woodworker's Warehouse/Golf Day stores?) and the round bottomed one always chatters - its only good for inside curves anyway, and necks are basically straight lines so a flat-bottomed spokeshave works best. I try to form the profile at each end with a rasp, then connect the two areas with straight lines. A block plane works also.
     
  16. horseman308

    horseman308 Tele-Holic

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    Thanks guys. I ended up finding an old Stanley 151 (maybe 60 years old or so) that was unused. Still had the original price tag, though the numbers have long faded. Needs some of the standard tune up, but it was $30, so I'm not gonna balk too much at that!
     
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  17. Vizcaster

    Vizcaster Poster Extraordinaire

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    Sweet. put the money you saved towards some DMT duosharp diamond whetstones. I think if I had to do it all over again I'd just buy the coarse/extra coarse one for flattening plane soles and fast shaping of bevels, then use the Arkansas or water stones that everyone seems to collect for final sharpening.
     
  18. horseman308

    horseman308 Tele-Holic

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    It's probably the wrong way, but I went with 120 grit wet/dry sand paper laid on my table saw top (it's a really flat cast iron Jet), using plenty of oil to do the flattening and fast bevel truing, then working through several grits of water stones for honing. Seems to have worked well so far.
     
  19. DP305

    DP305 TDPRI Member

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    Just picked up on this thread, as Richa mentions above, a Japanese saw file is definitely worth a mention. I have some nice woodworking rasps, and spokeshaves, but since purchasing my Shinto file I am completely sold on it. It has two different cuts, does not clog, easy to clean, (if the last two comments sound contradictory, users will understand), and not prohibitive cost wise, (£17 in the UK). It can move a lot of material, or be fairly delicate. Recommended.
     
  20. Guitar novice

    Guitar novice Tele-Afflicted

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    I'm a bit late to the discussion but I have the concave VERITAS one.

    Absolute joy to carve necks with. sort of work that is good for the soul.

    The simple card scraper is a must. I use it to fine tune the shape. for such a simple tool its probably right near the top of my must haves.

    Matthew
     
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