Recommendations-Dublin & Cork

Greggorios

Poster Extraordinaire
Joined
Jun 18, 2016
Posts
6,620
Location
NY
Drink Murphy’s in Cork (and visit Rory Gallagher’s grave fer chrissakes !)

Drink Guinness in Dublin (and visit the Guinness brewery fer chrissakes and marvel at the amount of its total production that stays in Ireland !😳😂)
Excellent suggestions!
 

bettyseldest

Friend of Leo's
Joined
Nov 13, 2011
Posts
3,447
Location
UK
My wife is Irish, so we have spent some time over there, very little of it in Dublin or Cork, though we did have a few very nice days in the aforementioned Skibbereen in County Cork. We are due over later this month, first visit since COVID, so primarily visiting the family, Galway, Limerick, Co Offaly, Clare and Tipperary North.

Many years ago we gave my parents a two week coach trip around the west of Ireland for their 50th wedding anniversary. I asked them if they had enjoyed themselves, and they said that it "was lovely and they had had a great time". In answer to the question about if they would go again, the response was "Oh no, why would we do that, it's just like Yorkshire, we can stay at home"
 

bettyseldest

Friend of Leo's
Joined
Nov 13, 2011
Posts
3,447
Location
UK
I've only ever been to Cork city briefly--wish I'd have a chance to spend more time there. The Cork accent is the best in Ireland. A lot of people want to say the best of Ireland is the towns, especially the county towns. I've been a A LOT of places in Ireland and spent about four months there altogether over the last few years. Skibbereen is a nice town. If I had to pick a single place it would be the Mayo/Sligo area
Pleased to see someone standing up for the Cork accent, I don't have a problem but my wife and her family detest it. It could have something to do with it being quite distinct, and the perception that the inhabitants of Cork see themselves as better than the rest of Ireland.

Love the towns, Dingle, Westport, Ennis, Skibbereen, Castlebar and Kinsal amongst others.
 

Wrighty

Poster Extraordinaire
Joined
Aug 17, 2013
Posts
6,029
Age
68
Location
Essex UK
Getting ready to travel to Yorkshire in the UK to visit family/friends. Have never been to Ireland so have planned to stop in Dublin and Cork on our way over for a few days (2 days in Dublin, 2 in Cork). We do have plans for a longer trip in the future-this is really just a couple days to get a first "taste". Any suggestions for must sees, restaurants, etc. would be appreciated. Thanks.
Spent time in both, advice I was given by a Dubliner before my first visit to Eire was 'to be sure, just walk out of your hotel and head in the same direction as everybody else'. he was right, did it on every visit and was never disappointed. Ireland is a friendly place. One time I was over on business and stayed in a small village midway between my appointments. It was remote so, after dinner, i just wandered out, following the crowd. There was a youth football game going on on the village green. Stood on the touchline and, within three minutes, I was a fervent supporter of one of the teams. After the match it was into the local where I stayed until about 11 pm chatting with the supporters of both teams. You'll love it!
 
Last edited:

Wrighty

Poster Extraordinaire
Joined
Aug 17, 2013
Posts
6,029
Age
68
Location
Essex UK
I've been to Dublin multiple times now, for long stays. Whelan's is a great place for non-traditional music: if you want traditional music the Cobblestone in Smithfield or the Piper's Corner near O'Connell Square. The area of south Dublin around the George St. Arcade is full of shops and bars. The Little Museum of Dublin on St. Stephens Green is a lot of fun, then walk down to the Shelbourne and have tea or lunch. The National Museum of Natural history (free) is like a time capsule. It's worth it to go to Kilmainham jail--you've seen it in a lot of movies and it's really important to the history of the country: the museum and tour are excellent. Also the post office museum tells the story of the Easter Rising very well. Temple bar is lively but kind of hokey for tourists. Grafton Street is a big pedestrian shopping street but you don't need to go to Ireland to shop in the same chain stores we have here. You could go into Bewley's on Grafton and have coffee and a snack.

A nice day trip from Dublin is to take the train to Howth, which is very pretty, and then take the Ferry from Howth to Dun Laoghaire. Then train back to Dublin. I like Dublin a lot but it's not a "glamorous" city.

I've only ever been to Cork city briefly--wish I'd have a chance to spend more time there. The Cork accent is the best in Ireland. A lot of people want to say the best of Ireland is the towns, especially the county towns. I've been a A LOT of places in Ireland and spent about four months there altogether over the last few years. Skibbereen is a nice town. If I had to pick a single place it would be the Mayo/Sligo area

Yes to Dun Laoghaire (pronounce 'Dunleary'). ferry and train rides are both great.

 

Weazel

Tele-Afflicted
Joined
Oct 21, 2009
Posts
1,839
Location
Location Location
I have been visiting Dublin at least once a year since 1995 (except for the last three years due to the "circumstances")

I always go to Whelan's for live contemporary music (often quite known artists on the bill as well) and to say hello to Joe at the bar.

The Brazen Head pub is obviously a tourist magnet, being "the oldest pub in Dublin" but if you time your visit right you can relax and enjoy a nice black and tan with the hands down best stew in Dublin. I kid you not.

Slattery's in Capel Street (Capel Street is really hot now) has become quite hip, but used to be the waterhole for members of Thin Lizzy and crew.

George Street Arcade get a visit from me every time as well: Coins, stamps, vintage clothes, books, vinyl, CDs, food and so on. A really charming place to spend some time.

Oh, and take a time out in st Stephen's Green at the end of Grafton Street. I often bring a light lunch and just sit for an hour or two.

And of course The Long Room in Trinity College. After seeing the Book of Kells.

Other than that, just use your feet. Explore.

And read Ulysses before you go.
Or not ;-)
 

Telekarster

Poster Extraordinaire
Joined
Aug 14, 2019
Posts
6,576
Location
Earth
I haven't been to Dublin in 20 years, so a lots probably changed in that time. I really loved that town though. Very pretty from I remember, and yes... you must try a pint of Guinness if you've had it in the states, cause it was vastly different in taste and body from what I recall over there. We also hit some antique shops and that was pretty interesting as well, if you like doing that sort of thing. It's really something when you see a chair for sale that was made over 300 years ago. Pretty neat I think. Have a good time man, and be safe!!!
 

maxvintage

Poster Extraordinaire
Joined
Mar 16, 2003
Posts
6,238
Age
63
Location
Arlington, VA
Yes, the Guiness is WAY better than in the states. I can't figure out why, but ask the bartender why and you will likely get an entertainng conversation

If you've got a taste for megalithic ruins Bru Na Boinne (Newgrange) is not far from Dublin and worth a trip. I'm pretty sure there's a bus that runs from Dublin. The main site is older that Stonehenge and older than the pyramids. It's famous because the sun shines directly in the doorway on the winter solstice. What you see is a heavily reconstructed version of what was actually there--to my mind it's a little heavy handed. But the Bru Na Boinne site has to other megalithic mounds that are less heavily reconstructed but in some ways much more impressive, especially Knowth. There's a bus that takes you around to the other sites. I found it really fascinating and kind of eerie. Flights from DC get in at 5:30 am so last time last October I drove right out to Bru Na Boinne and poked around before it officially opened. You'll be there well after the tourist season which will be nice


Near cork: this looks really cool but I've never visited
The sky garden in West Cork" https://www.irishcentral.com/travel/travel-tips/irelands-travel-secrets-sky-garden-west-cork
 

Wrighty

Poster Extraordinaire
Joined
Aug 17, 2013
Posts
6,029
Age
68
Location
Essex UK
Yes, the Guiness is WAY better than in the states. I can't figure out why, but ask the bartender why and you will likely get an entertainng conversation

If you've got a taste for megalithic ruins Bru Na Boinne (Newgrange) is not far from Dublin and worth a trip. I'm pretty sure there's a bus that runs from Dublin. The main site is older that Stonehenge and older than the pyramids. It's famous because the sun shines directly in the doorway on the winter solstice. What you see is a heavily reconstructed version of what was actually there--to my mind it's a little heavy handed. But the Bru Na Boinne site has to other megalithic mounds that are less heavily reconstructed but in some ways much more impressive, especially Knowth. There's a bus that takes you around to the other sites. I found it really fascinating and kind of eerie. Flights from DC get in at 5:30 am so last time last October I drove right out to Bru Na Boinne and poked around before it officially opened. You'll be there well after the tourist season which will be nice


Near cork: this looks really cool but I've never visited
The sky garden in West Cork" https://www.irishcentral.com/travel/travel-tips/irelands-travel-secrets-sky-garden-west-cork
Simple! Beer is mostly water. We used to get Guinness brewed in England, Dagenham or thereabouts.. Water from the Thames ain’t ever gonna taste the same as water from the Liffey. Plus, they know how to store it in Ireland.
 

maxvintage

Poster Extraordinaire
Joined
Mar 16, 2003
Posts
6,238
Age
63
Location
Arlington, VA
Simple! Beer is mostly water. We used to get Guinness brewed in England, Dagenham or thereabouts.. Water from the Thames ain’t ever gonna taste the same as water from the Liffey. Plus, they know how to store it in Ireland.
Yeah, I've seen the Liffey, and smelled it. It's not exactly what you think of when you think "oh that'll taste good!" More like "how sick will I get."

I actually think if the water is the key--a plausible theory despite the dirty green color of the Liffey--that Guinness could find a way to brew it and ship it to the US while maintaining the quality, I mean, it's the 21st century. There are rumors, which Irish bartenders are happy to spread, that certain bars in Boston and NYC have "the real Guinness"

There's also a funny twitter feed called "S--t London Guinness" which is nothing but pictures of poorly drawn pints--too much head, not enough head, weird bubbly heads--and then people deploring the state of that pint!

I mean, seriously

Screen Shot 2022-10-03 at 6.04.42 PM.png
 

scottser

Friend of Leo's
Joined
Mar 6, 2009
Posts
3,673
Location
dublin
Yeah, I've seen the Liffey, and smelled it. It's not exactly what you think of when you think "oh that'll taste good!" More like "how sick will I get."

I actually think if the water is the key--a plausible theory despite the dirty green color of the Liffey--that Guinness could find a way to brew it and ship it to the US while maintaining the quality, I mean, it's the 21st century. There are rumors, which Irish bartenders are happy to spread, that certain bars in Boston and NYC have "the real Guinness"

There's also a funny twitter feed called "S--t London Guinness" which is nothing but pictures of poorly drawn pints--too much head, not enough head, weird bubbly heads--and then people deploring the state of that pint!

I mean, seriously

View attachment 1036231
Ah here, there's no need for that..
 

Greggorios

Poster Extraordinaire
Joined
Jun 18, 2016
Posts
6,620
Location
NY
I haven't been to Dublin in 20 years, so a lots probably changed in that time. I really loved that town though. Very pretty from I remember, and yes... you must try a pint of Guinness if you've had it in the states, cause it was vastly different in taste and body from what I recall over there. We also hit some antique shops and that was pretty interesting as well, if you like doing that sort of thing. It's really something when you see a chair for sale that was made over 300 years ago. Pretty neat I think. Have a good time man, and be safe!!!
Thanks, much appreciated. I like your mention of the antique chair. That’s one of the things I’ve found so interesting when traveling, particularly in Europe. We Americans can’t really appreciate just what a young country we are until we get to the “old country”. When someone says they live in a family home it’s not just going back to grand dad it’s going back to grand, grand,grand, grand dad and further!
 

maxvintage

Poster Extraordinaire
Joined
Mar 16, 2003
Posts
6,238
Age
63
Location
Arlington, VA
Thanks, much appreciated. I like your mention of the antique chair. That’s one of the things I’ve found so interesting when traveling, particularly in Europe. We Americans can’t really appreciate just what a young country we are until we get to the “old country”. When someone says they live in a family home it’s not just going back to grand dad it’s going back to grand, grand,grand, grand dad and further!
deleted
 

Telekarster

Poster Extraordinaire
Joined
Aug 14, 2019
Posts
6,576
Location
Earth
Thanks, much appreciated. I like your mention of the antique chair. That’s one of the things I’ve found so interesting when traveling, particularly in Europe. We Americans can’t really appreciate just what a young country we are until we get to the “old country”. When someone says they live in a family home it’s not just going back to grand dad it’s going back to grand, grand,grand, grand dad and further!

Yep! I'll never forget that chair. I'd have bought it if I could've found a way to get it home, but it was going to be too much trouble and expensive to ship it. It was a fairly large and heavy chair, made of English oak I think. It was ornately carved with scrollwork and filigree and what was interesting was that the craftsman who made it, beautifully carved the date he made it onto the back of it. That date, if I recall correctly, was something like 1663! I've always thought that the chair was made for some sort of commemoration of some kind i.e. it was very fancy, well made, dated, and made for something important by a master craftsman of that time.
 

Pcs264

Tele-Meister
Joined
Apr 26, 2020
Posts
266
Age
70
Location
North Carolina
My wife and I just visited Ireland in June and we already can't wait to return; wonderful people and country. Here are two different recommendations to consider:
1. Yes, the Guiness is noticeably better there, but you should also try Smithwick's Red Ale (pronounced "Smiddicks"). That became my new favorite - very good in the US but even better in Ireland.
2. Check out Some Neck Guitars in Dublin, not far from St. Patricks' Cathedral. Has an interesting and always changing stock of vintage and used electrics, amps, and acoustics, and stands up well to most of the better vintage dealers in the US.
Have fun and travel safely!
 




Top