Recommend someone to nitro finish my neck

Discussion in 'Finely Finished' started by heffus, Jul 1, 2019.

  1. heffus

    heffus Tele-Holic

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    I've got a brand new Musikraft all maple tele neck that I was planning to finish myself.
    After a little research on the process and considering the fact that I live in an apartment I've decided to just let a professional do it. Just looking for a nice satin nitro that's
    not too yellow or orange. Any suggestions?
     

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  2. SacDAve

    SacDAve Poster Extraordinaire

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    You might try a local Luthier, Small cabinet shop maybe. Or you might reach to someone on TDPRI might have to send it to someone.
     
  3. cc50fralin

    cc50fralin Tele-Meister

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    Perhaps call Warmoth.
    I think they would finish your neck, and it would be done right.

    Mike .;)
     
  4. sleazy pot pie

    sleazy pot pie Tele-Afflicted

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    You can send it mjt and they will do it any way you want.
    Like posted above, if all you want is just a lacquer finish on it, a local guy could do it easier and possibly cheaper.
    It isn’t a tough job. From an apartment would pose some challenges.
     
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  5. Fretting out

    Fretting out Tele-Holic

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    I second MJT , you’d have to ship it to them but there work is great (first hand experience) with reasonable pricing and you can have them finish to any tint or even relic it to any degree you like if that’s your thing
     
  6. Freeman Keller

    Freeman Keller Tele-Afflicted

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    I'll play the devils advocate and ask why you want a nitro finish? It happens that is all I use anymore, but it is not the only finish in the world. A number of the waterborn lacquers can be brushed, French polish is not unreasonable (however it would not be my choice for a neck), and probably the most popular finish for someone who can't spray or tolerate the fumes is gun stock oil.

    With that said, nitro is the easiest finish for an inexperienced home builder to apply - a couple of rattle cans, a few minutes on a patio or in your parking lot and you can actually do a pretty decent job. 0000 steel wool will make it satin.
     
  7. ppg677

    ppg677 Tele-Meister

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    Agree with Freeman.

    Consider Tru-Oil. Very apartment and winter friendly.

    But even aerosol lacquer can be done by an apartment dweller easy enough in the summer. Just find some place outdoors to spray it. Each coat will dry in 30 minutes or so. Once dry it is not that smelly and can be brought inside
     
  8. sleazy pot pie

    sleazy pot pie Tele-Afflicted

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    You could also spray shellac through a preval.
    You just mist a couple of coats on and call it a day.
     
  9. heffus

    heffus Tele-Holic

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    OK you guys got me thinking of maybe giving the rattle can lacquer a try. I never considered tru oil, though I know
    a lot of people around here love it. I've always wondered if tru oil is gonna give the raw maple the protection it needs.
    I'm aware of MJT, but I was trying not to spend $200 right now if possible.
     
    Last edited: Jul 1, 2019
  10. Fretting out

    Fretting out Tele-Holic

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    If considered oil should be perfectly adequate for protection and you can always add more if need be.
    I think it’s recommended to add some every so often but there’s debates if it’s necessary. And as said it’s very easy to do yourself and non ventilated indoor friendly
    All depends on what feel you’re looking for or if you just want a traditional finish.
    A rattle can is very easy to use even with little experience, tricks just not to go too heavy or be tempted to “touch it up” before it’s dry
     
    Last edited: Jul 2, 2019
  11. Chunkocaster

    Chunkocaster Poster Extraordinaire

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    For $8 bucks you could use tru oil and it will look very close to nitro, probably look nicer and pop any grain, figure it has more. Tint it with vintage amber to get the exact color you like.
     
  12. bumnote

    bumnote Tele-Meister

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    Tru-Oil will protect the wood just fine, I've used to finish gun stocks and those get exposed to far harsher environments than I'd ever subject a guitar to. If you want to tint it, Stew Mac has tints in various colors that can be diluted in water or rubbing alcohol for a lighter color.
    I recently did a body in nitro on my apartment balcony, supplies ran around $65 total....for the first attempt. Can of paint, can of clear coat, a painter's mask, googles and dish washing gloves, wet/dry sandpaper and polishing compound.
    If you do apply nitro...it is imperative that you don't do it on a humid day. If the humidity is high when you apply it, it will suck up the moisture and you'll have a milky white film. Learned that the hard way and did it twice. Apply the finish and take inside to dry each layer. Bend a wire hanger to suspend the neck by a tuner hole and hang on the shower rod.
     
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  13. EsquireOK

    EsquireOK Friend of Leo's

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    Guitar Mill, RS Guitar Works, or Brian Monty (Canada).

    That said, if you are at all proficient with a spray can, it's very cheap and easy to do by yourself. Reranch, Mohawk, and some others provide a nice product, and all it takes for a neck is one can.

    Tru-Oil is not at all like a lacquer finish. It takes much more time and work to apply well, it's much thinner, and in the end, once the final finish is on and dried, it acts more like a urethane than like a lacquer. It's not a good choice for those who want the old school Fender neck feel. It has a very modern feel to it.
     
    Last edited: Jul 2, 2019
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  14. Freeman Keller

    Freeman Keller Tele-Afflicted

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    If you decide to send you neck out for finish 200 bucks is probably a pretty decent figure. You have a couple of big questions that the finisher would be asking (at least I would). Your picture is a maple fretboard - I assume that means you want the f/b finished. How thick do you want the lacquer? How do you want the lacquer removed from the frets?

    Speaking of the frets, how are they? One of the problems with finishing over the f/b is you need to do the leveling, crowning and dressing before the finish goes on. Its been my experience that every aftermarket neck I've ever seen needs some fretwork (I have high standards). Who is going to do that?

    Who will ream the tuner holes, drill the little mounting screws for tuners and trees? Drilling into a finish runs a risk of cracking the finish.

    How long are you willing to wait? When I do lacquer I figure 3 coats a day over about a week, then 3 weeks of drying time before the buff. I know some people don't wait that long but I do. So with shipping back and forth we would be looking at 5 or more weeks turn around

    (obviously if you did either lacquer or TruOil yourself you would have to deal with the cure time - people quote 24 thin coats of TruOil plus 30+ days of cure as reasonable).

    If I was doing the finish I would want to know that there is absolutely nothing on the neck - no sealers or anything else. I would want to do all the preparation. If it had decals on the head I couldn't promise that I could preserve them.

    Yeah, when I first started thinking about this I would have guess about twice that price. If you can get it done for 200 that might be your best bet.
     
  15. magicfingers99

    magicfingers99 Friend of Leo's

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    i wouldn't use nitro on a neck its too soft. an oil finish will give you the same feel and just as much protection. Nitro will spider eventually from heat/humidity and degradation of the chemical base of the compound.

    it was one of the 1st plastics invented, but it wasn't one of the best.
     
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  16. heffus

    heffus Tele-Holic

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  17. Festus_Hagen

    Festus_Hagen Tele-Holic

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    I can do it, but so can you.

    Get the Vintage Amber from Stew Mac. Spray outside when not real humid or windy.
    When you think just a little more will be enough, STOP .
    Get some clear Watco or MinWax and clear coat it.
    You will have to think about a Decal. I use my own.

    Something that small isn't difficult. Good luck!
     
  18. sleazy pot pie

    sleazy pot pie Tele-Afflicted

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    It really isn’t difficult, it is just daunting the first time.
    If all you want is a clear nitro finish, you can do that with one can easily.
    You could do one or two light passes a day for a week and be good to go.
    If you have an old wooden baseball bat you could practice on that.
    The biggest issue is putting on too much too fast and getting either runs or blushing.
    Or you could do wipe on poly and be done in an afternoon.
     
  19. ladave

    ladave Tele-Holic

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    Having just finished spraying my third nitro neck (first maple board), I agree with others that it's not very difficult...hardest part was removing the lacquer from the frets.

    But I would say only do it if you like the idea of doing it yourself. If you feel like you want that experience. It sounds like maybe you do, or thought you did originally.

    The reason I say that is because by the time you buy all the supplies (remember a high quality respirator) and you consider the hours you will spend, the $200 MJT job might be the better deal.
     
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  20. magicfingers99

    magicfingers99 Friend of Leo's

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    maple used on necks is a pretty hard wood. all the finish does it is keep the dirt and dust off the wood. The only protection it needs is from moisture, which oil repels water...
    you could try oil 1st, if you don't like it you can strip it off with 99% Isopropyl alcohol (wear gloves, it will also take the oil off your skin, which ain't comfortable) and then put on the Nitro, if it turns out you prefer that..
     
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