Recommend a drill..

Discussion in 'The DIY Tool Shed' started by ieatlions, Jun 13, 2021.

  1. telepraise

    telepraise Tele-Afflicted

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    Makita. I bought a small set- cordless drill, impact driver, flashlight, charger in 2010 and just had to replace the batteries last year. I've also had their sliding miter saw for even longer. Smooth, professional grade tools for not much more than the big box hobbyist stuff.

    As peego explained, sadly most of the quality name brands have been bought out by conglomerates and joined the race to the bottom to fill the big box stores with $50 tools you throw away in a few years. Saddest for me is Porter Cable, once a solid American company who built tools here in the U.S. that would last a lifetime (I still have one of their USA circular saws). Now their tools are all budget Chinese and probably on par with what you could get at Harbor Freight.

    Bosch still makes some amazing tools, manufactured in Germany or Switzerland and priced accordingly, that will probably last decades. But they also have a cheaper line you'll find in the big box stores.
     
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  2. schmee

    schmee Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    I quit buying expensive cordless after a ton of wasted money on Makita. I now buy "bargain sales" drills with a battery system that isn't unique. My current Black and Decker has lasted 4 years. It cost I think $29+. I had to replace the battery a year ago though, $18 on Amazon, and holds charge much better than the original ever did. I've been rebuilding my deck after 20 years and using the drill most days. I need to remember to plug it in, it's been days!
     
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  3. old wrench

    old wrench Friend of Leo's

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    I don't think I'd ever get to point where I'd ditch them, but I certainly don't use cordless tools exclusively.

    Most of my work is still done with regular old 120 volt powered tools.

    But having the option to switch to cordless for convenience is definitely where it's at :).

    I'm old enough to recall lunch-time conversations on the job-site where we talked about some day in the future when we wouldn't be restricted by a power cord.

    We had some pretty good ideas back then about how those tools of the future would operate too ;).

    What makes these small light-weight cordless tools possible is battery innovations.

    The further that we can move battery advancements forward, the more compact and light-weight the cordless tools will get.

    .
     
  4. 1 21 gigawatts

    1 21 gigawatts Tele-Afflicted

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    Love my Milwaukee M18 tools. I've had Dewault and Makita drills in the past. Slowly converting everything to M18.
     
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  5. beninma

    beninma Friend of Leo's

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    I have 2 DeWalt drills and an impact driver.

    My corded one is from before they were acquired, it's about 20 years old.

    My other two are about 4-5 years old and are the 20V Max stuff.

    What is your use case? If you're not a contractor using it all day every week you shouldn't be destroying stuff.

    All my stuff has been fine for years. The 20V Max stuff is actually WAY more powerful than my old corded drill. And I don't have the fancier XR Brushless stuff.

    For homeowner grade stuff almost anything should get the job done. I have some big jobs I occasionally help out with around docks, and such. The Dewalt stuff I have has been fine. A while back I helped out replacing a corral fence at a farm that does charity stuff... I used those two drills all day long tearing apart an old fence and putting a new one together.. way bigger job than anything I ever need to do at home and it's all been fine and nothing broke.

    I built my workbench and a bunch of other stuff to.

    Interestingly I didn't buy my 20V Max stuff at a big box store IIRC. I'm pretty sure I bought it from the local hardware store. I have seen some other stuff that is indeed cheaper if you buy it at Lowe's or Home Depot.. but you ought to be able to find different model #s and SKUs if that is the case.
     
  6. trapdoor2

    trapdoor2 Friend of Leo's Gold Supporter

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    My experience is as a homeowner (when I was a mech, we were all pneumatic). I probably jumped on the battery bandwagon too early, 90s? I think they were Makita 9.4v.

    While I enjoyed the convenience, my work station quickly became a storage place for dead batteries. I could never get past the forward planning needed to have a fresh charge ready. Also, when they actually died, the tech had moved forward and nobody local had replacements.

    So, while I'm still attracted to battery power, I designed my shop with lots of bench-height outlets. I even have ceiling outlets for retractable cord reels. A 100ft cord reaches anything outside from the exterior house outlets.

    And, being half luddite anyway, I have a collection of 19th C hand tools that can be recalled to service if needed.
     
  7. old wrench

    old wrench Friend of Leo's

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    Yeah those old Makita 9.6 volt batteries were par for the course back then - not a whole lot of life to them.

    The newer Makita 18 volt bricks are much better ;)



    Having enough 120 volt outlets and having them in convenient places is what works for me too.

    That's why I rarely use battery tools in my shop :)
     
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  8. magicfingers99

    magicfingers99 Friend of Leo's

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    Favorite drill?

    you just can't beat waking em up at the crack a dawn and makin them run around the barracks a dozen times in their skivvies. then fryin up a mess a pancakes..
     
  9. Blue Bill

    Blue Bill Poster Extraordinaire Ad Free Member

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    Milwaukee and Ridgid get my vote. Makitas are OK too. I had a Panasonic drill/driver set that lasted for years of heavy use, but I don't think they make them anymore.
     
  10. David Barnett

    David Barnett Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    My Makita 18V drill has been with me since the 1990s. It's big and clunky, but reliable. I'd rather have something more ergonomic, but this one won't die and I can't justify replacing it.
     
  11. David Barnett

    David Barnett Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    I've had the impression that Ridgid is what you buy if you're on a Ryobi budget but want a better tool. It's a house brand, but their stuff seems to be not disappointing.
     
  12. Blue Bill

    Blue Bill Poster Extraordinaire Ad Free Member

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    I had a big set of Ridgid 18V tools, hammer drill, impact driver, circular say, sawzall, and flashlight. They took a good beating and kept working. No complaints.
     
  13. Wallaby

    Wallaby Friend of Leo's

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    I like Milwaukee and Ridgid myself, I've had no problems or breakdowns. YMMV, I am not a contractor.
     
  14. oldunc

    oldunc Tele-Afflicted

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    Plumbers and electricians tend to be crazy about their Hole Hogs, so naturally Milwaukee; I think most electricians prefer their portable bandsaw, too, and the Magnum drills were always great for the largish holes plumbers use so many of.
     
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  15. irie

    irie Tele-Holic

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    Another vote for Makita, although I also love my Hilti Tools.
     
  16. 7171551

    7171551 Tele-Afflicted

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  17. telemnemonics

    telemnemonics Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Plumbers are special people and I always try to make sure their SPECIAL NEEDS are met BEFORE they cut half the framing out of the bathroom floor! They respond well to treats like offering to cut open stuff for them and with a little training they make great pets!
     
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  18. kingofdogs1950

    kingofdogs1950 Tele-Afflicted

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    I currently own a DeWalt that is about five years old and works fine.
    It does not get heavy usage.
    The best drill I've ever owned was a corded Stanley Mighty Midget drill from the mid '70s. Small and a ton of power.
    It was ~$100 back then which was a lot, but it was a great drill.
    Sadly stolen.

    King
     
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  19. ieatlions

    ieatlions Tele-Afflicted

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    Ok. Great recommendations fellas. Spoke to a few tradesmen that live near me. Consensus is that DeWalt seems to be struggling quality wise, for the last few years. Hitachi/Hikoki was a brand that was highly regarded by the plumbers and carpenters.

    As fate would have it, Ive actually been gifted a cordless..

    2B10D221-0A3B-4272-9FC9-8B496E9DF6B0.jpeg

    Not even sure how old this model is but I must say I’m pleasantly surprised. Going into masonry easily and had no problem
    drilling many holes through timber with a medium size spade bit.
     
  20. oldunc

    oldunc Tele-Afflicted

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    I remember it well.
     
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