Recessed electrosocket port

Wheelhouse

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Try it on scrap and see how it goes. I really wanted to use two Forstner bits in succession but never managed to get a perfect result.
My project has MUCH less depth to drill through, so I can hopefully get away with free-handing the drill. o_O I'm estimating I have just enough depth for the electrosocket. I'll post it in my build thread.
 

Steve Holt

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we had one of those stories too ... and even today, the jointer gives me the heebie jeebies..
I had flashbacks to when my junior high woodshop teacher cut off his fingertip showing us the safe was to use a jointer.

Yeah the only injury in the wood shop that I can remember from when I was in high school was the shop teacher slicing through two of his fingers on the table saw.
 

Steve Holt

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I've seen a couple of different methods described to create a recessed port for an electrosocket, but this one worked so well for me that I thought I'd post it here for other builders. I'm in the midst of building four guitars (one Tele, three Jazzmasters) using a chambered "clamshell" approach, and I wanted to recess the electrosockets, especially for the Jazzmasters as I was planning for a side-mounted output jack rather than on the pickguard. Hope this is useful to you!

Used a Rockler self-centering doweling jig to drill a 1/4" pilot hole at the desired location. Body clamped to my bench, jig in place...

View attachment 999092

I considered other, cheaper jigs (e.g. from Amazon) but decided to spend a bit more for the Rockler jig. I think it was a good decision... This thing rocks! I didn't drill too deeply as I wanted to make sure that the arbor pilot would still have something to bite.

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Spot-on centered pilot hole!

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I used a 1" hole saw with a 1/4" piloted arbor to create the outer shelf for the electrosocket. This is best done at very low speed... You don't want to go too deep, and you don't want to tear up the wood. Practice several times on scrap before you try this on your precious guitar body!

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Looks good so far!

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Next, switch to a 7/8" hole saw on the same arbor to drill the main hole...

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There we go! Lightly sand with 220 to clean up the edges.

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Electrosocket in place! Just what I had in mind!

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This worked very well for all four bodies. The Tele body had a flat spot for the output jack, but the Jazzmaster bodies I built were rounded so recessing the electrosocket was really key to getting a good look for those projects!

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Ciao!
Rick

Man those bodies look great! I always love a good sandwich body with a thin slice in the middle. Can you go over your method on how you build these? Where do you get the wood?
 

Medeltids

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the "secret" is to have everything locked down solid so there can be no wobble, or no drift... that's only gonna happen with a drill press where the body can be clamped into position.. or by creating some kinda jig to hold the body and a hand drill solidly...
+1 on this Ron. Seems most of the forstners and brad point bits I buy have a slight bit of wobble - some have a lot. Frustrating...especially when I try to buy top shelf tools when possible. Clamping everything tight really helps.
 

blackbelt308

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Man those bodies look great! I always love a good sandwich body with a thin slice in the middle. Can you go over your method on how you build these? Where do you get the wood?

Thank you! I will do that, hopefully this weekend, once I get the first Jazzmaster assembled & set up...
 

Steve Holt

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Thank you! I will do that, hopefully this weekend, once I get the first Jazzmaster assembled & set up...

Here's the one I'm currently working on still pretty rough and barely sanded. Maple and rosewood. Life would be easier if I had a drum sander, but I get by.
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Maricopa

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What Ron said, Forstner bits. Super clean.
 

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The Spruce Plan

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The sandwich body is something I never considered until now. Makes it easier to make use of thinner wood, too.
I like your work, I'm a huge fan of wood being the color that it is.
 

1bad914

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Yeah the only injury in the wood shop that I can remember from when I was in high school was the shop teacher slicing through two of his fingers on the table saw.
The only tool in my shop to come even close to damaging me is (so far, knock on wood) my drill press. Seems benign, but if it decides to grab the item you are drilling, you will lose the grip battle. After that happening twice I clamp almost everything I drill if possible.

To stay on content, smart way to do that. I also like the PVC idea. Smart people on this forum.
 

poolshark

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I use a 7/8" Forstner bit and drill the entire hole into the control cavity.
After that I just use one of these for the step to flush mount the electrosocket.
View attachment 1017593
Feels like I have a million step bits around the shop, and this is why. Great for enlarging electronics and tuner holes, great for countersinking electrosockets, and easily modified for countersinking flush mount ferrules and the like. I even use them to enlarge neck screw holes when installing machine screws and inserts.
 




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