Reason to Buy More Expensive Fender

Discussion in 'Telecaster Discussion Forum' started by RoCkstAr256, Feb 4, 2020.

  1. RoCkstAr256

    RoCkstAr256 Friend of Leo's

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    This is also true, we get lower quality wood, not one piece. Some vintage things will cost a million although cheap guitars are playable compared to previous decades of really bad quality ones. We might be not able to get colour, sound, feel etc of a cheap guitar, although it will play and makes us happy. I mean these guitars are "doable" they do they job and doesnt sound like uncle Bob farts anymore. However i still find Squier superior to harley benton. I sometimes even miss my cheap Bullet strat. It was low quality but playable and good sounding piece of wood. Sold it to local jam club
     
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  2. Hari Seldon

    Hari Seldon Tele-Meister

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    Yes, the low price has some reasons.

    MY HB has a great neck. When I went into the store I wanted to joke about these cheapos and picked one up. I noticed it had a fine neck with straight grain and a fine shape.
    I tried it out and insisted on having this one, not one from the inventory.
    With cheapos, it's always possible that you get an outlier that's much better than the usual quality. With cheap guitars it's not possible to check and control all the supplies, and so there can be a much better plank than it is normal.
    With a real good guitar you pay for the selected parts and woods, too.
     
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  3. boris bubbanov

    boris bubbanov Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

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    Everybody's ears, and sensibilities, are different. Expensive works well for some; expensive can be a huge waste of money for others.

    I bought Thirty of these Surabaya Squier 51s, for between $ 69 and $ 99 each. Mostly the $ 69. I picked through a huge stack of fully boxed up guitars and culled the ones that impressed me most on brief inspection and mock playing (not plugged in).

    Of those 30, about ten gradually fell out of contention and I donated those away. The remaining ones are clearly the pick of the litter. You change the nut, the tuning machines and before you know it you have a mostly redone guitar with fretwork all leveled, crowned and polished and in some cases multiple times.

    Will they ever be equivalent to my FCS No-Caster, or some of the no holds barred USACG projects? No, but they sure are better than the overwhelming numbers of guitars I got to play in the 1960s and 1970s. Pretty impressive.
     
    Last edited: Feb 5, 2020
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  4. nicod98

    nicod98 Tele-Afflicted

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    As I mentioned, I was in the wood trade for several years, with imports to Europe from all over the world... You can be pretty sure that if you pay low price for wood in South East Asia or South America, and the wood is sawn locally, that there will be a cheap worker that selects the best pieces for another customer. If that worker can only find a few pieces a day, he is more than worth it to the sawmill owner. So cheap wood is "selected" as well, meaning "the best pieces are left out". So those "excellent" pieces of wood should be rare.

    For north European factories, this is mostly done with machines, and if you pay for a quality level "III", you definitely won't get a quality "I" or "II".
     
  5. Corvus

    Corvus Tele-Meister

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    Here's reality check and confession. Having at last been able - with a generous trade in - to buy an American Custom shop tele - I'm glad I did; it's a really fine playing/looking and sounding instrument. Yes! It does everything better; . But..by how much - certainly not thousands of £'s/ $'s? How much "better" is it than my MIM Roadworns or the astonishing Squier CV Pinecaster that was a tenth of the new price? If I'm honest, not that much because even affordable guitars are so damn finely constructed and sounding. I guess it's actually true that, in spite of my years of chasing the ultimate guitar, in the end, provided it's well made, it really is all about how you move your fingers!
     
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  6. sothoth

    sothoth Tele-Holic Double Platinum Supporter

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    Just spend your money on what works for you. If the Harley Benton works, you’ve gotten a great value and the thinner sound is probably not that apparent outside of a controlled (or even manipulated) side-by-side.

    I wish there were decent sub-$200 guitars out there when I was getting started, but there really weren’t, and in those days $200 went farther than it does now.
     
  7. FenderGuy53

    FenderGuy53 Poster Extraordinaire

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    Okay. How do YOU define "superior"?
     
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  8. Obsessed

    Obsessed Telefied Ad Free Member

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    An interesting thread with great comments and opinions about an often discussed topic. If I had not read the entire thread, I would have been much more blunt with my opinion (and have been in the past), but I have come to the conclusion, that collectively, we are very fortunate to have so many options and price points with guitars. We all have different circumstances, emotions, talent, space and financial wherewithal to find the "right" guitar for each one of us. It is the golden era for our passion, so embrace it. These are no different kinds of choices than other issues in our lives. I hope everyone here finds guitars that they fully enjoy to create music.

    That said, for me I would put my hard earned bucks into acoustics as a priority. A bolt-on neck solidbody electric to me should be the least expensive guitars in our quivers. But that again is just me and my logic, which I assume is as unique as everyone else's personal preferences.
     
  9. Hari Seldon

    Hari Seldon Tele-Meister

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    No. To most players, yes, but not to those with higher demands.

    I can play on my HB, but I have no chance to deliver everything on a simple instrument. I do need a great instrument for some jobs, and I still haven't found one under the CS/boutique level that delivers like these.

    The electric guitar is a simple and very cheap instrument. A student violin/cello starts in the price region of a top level electric guitar. You don't expect to play with the pros on a sub standard instrument in classical music. You don't even try.
    It should be accepted that different applications demand different instruments. For me it's a bit disrespectful when I read all the time that it's only a matter of the fingers when it clearly isn't. There's no one size fits all, and I didn't have to spend the money for the tools of my trade just for fun. Not every musician is a hobbyist, and while many pros play music where they can use cheap instruments many can't.
    The same with me - when I play rock or folk violin I use a cheap 3000.- fiddle and not my five-figure concert violin, because for that music the cheap one is good enough.
     
  10. RoCkstAr256

    RoCkstAr256 Friend of Leo's

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    Ok maybe.noy superior but it as good or even a little bit better price to quality
     
  11. TwangerWannabe

    TwangerWannabe Tele-Meister

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    It becomes a debate of diminishing returns past a certain price point. Whatever that price point vs. diminishing returns all depends on the individual.

    I’ve owned everything from CV and CVC Squiers to USA made AVRIs, and there have even exceptional examples and duds at all price points. My current Tele is a CVC body with a Fender Classic 50s neck, bone but, Fender OV pickups and a traditional Fender bridge plate with brass saddles. Frets have been leveled, crowned and polished. As good if not better than any other Tele I’ve ever owned and cost way less than others I’ve owned.
     
  12. 4pickupguy

    4pickupguy Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

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    My number one guitar for two years was a Walmart Sawtooth tele I found in a pawnshop for $55. I replaced the pickups to Cavaliers and it sounds great. Theres a video of that guitar on the Cavalier website.
     
  13. RoCkstAr256

    RoCkstAr256 Friend of Leo's

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    True , matter of point of view. We have different needs but theres some recipie to find out whats better. Passion, feel might change throught years, i havn never thought about Teles and Strats as metalhead. Now i like both metal and blues, rock. We can pin this thread for new comers. I cannot answer all the post. I did not expect to make it that long. I have already found Teles to be my favourite, i might get Super Champ x2 since i did dreamed about this amplifier time ago. However this is still future, i hope everyone will find their likes fater time that sound and feel great at the same time
     
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  14. Martocaster

    Martocaster TDPRI Member

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    I think it depends how specific you are about what you want. I have a CV Tele which is a fantastic guitar for the money, but is it perfect for me? Not really. If I were choosing my own spec I’d want 7.25 radius, soft v neck with rolled edges, nitro finish and maybe some light aging, all of which I imagine can be had but for a lot more money. So I guess sometimes it is worth paying more to get exactly what you want without any compromises.
     
  15. nicod98

    nicod98 Tele-Afflicted

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    For me, and I might not be alone, the balance - at my player level - is in the 350-700 euro price range. I do think the "cheaper" Fenders are a bit overpriced when purely looking at the specs, but I thank marketing for that.

    You do make a valid point here. I have an acousting with rolled eges, and although I never missed that on any of my electrics, that would be a nice extra.
    It's all about how we feel about our guitar. You state you think the CV is a fantastic guitar for the money, and I agree. Even though some of the extras you mention seem very nice to me (except for the "light aging" ;)), I say I the CV is perfect for me, and you say it's not perfect for you, even though we have the same - or very similar - opinion. So I take it that you think about those extra features as more important than I do.
    Again here there is possible two different ways of saying the same. It's all about feeling.

    When I bought my '72 Thinline, I tried both the Squier and the MIM version. Soundwise I could not differentiate, I LOVED the feeling of both of them, and I ended up buying the Squier. I suppose the quality of the MIM was better, but not in obvious ways. For some reason I preferred the Squier. This could because of the way it was set up.
    So I preferred the "cheaper" version to the (probably) "better" version. Was it really better? possibly. If price points are close enough togethe, that certainly is a possibility!
    For me (in my feeling) it really was better. Or did it just "feel" better because I could not really differentiate between the two, I "feel" I got the better deal? Perhaps.

    Some things CAN be measured. But many things are really personal. Does the thickness guitar really make that much of a difference? For some, perhaps, for others, no way.

    As mentioned here before there is always a price vs quality (or functionality) trade-off. And we all have different preferences. After filtering out a few urban legends, this thread really does have valid points for a more educated discussion in "cheap vs expensive" guitars. Here we're talking quality and sound.
    There's also another discussion that could be held: Fender? Squier? G&L? copy brands? Which ones are morally acceptable? (when talking about the Fender designed models of course)
     
  16. Tonetele

    Tonetele Poster Extraordinaire

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    We have a boutique store in this city. It has a beat up looking, 1963 Fiesta Red L- series Stratocaster for $19,500.00 AUD. I know what it sounds like as I played in a band with it's previous owner. If I had the money I'd buy it in a heartbeat.
    So YES to the OP- it can be necessary to buy if you have the $$$s and the need to own/play one professionally.
     
  17. -Hawk-

    -Hawk- Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

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    I suppose it’s how you look at what “waste of money” means to you individually.

    I’ve bought a bunch of cheap guitars and some of them were fine. What’s interesting is I have exactly zero of those guitars left. I just bought and traded and modded them until I cut my losses and moved on to the next one. To me, that’s a more egregious waste of money than spending more for something I like and actually keep long term.
     
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  18. admiralbob77

    admiralbob77 Tele-Meister

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    I've got a black Fender diamond anniversary Tele that I've modded the heck out of, putting Samarium Cobalt Noiseless in them and new aftermarket saddles. That guitar is near perfect. But it is perfect because I made it so.

    I just picked up a 2019 butterscotch CV as a backup. In terms of playing and handling, I can hardly tell the difference. The neck's glossier on the CV, but it isn't that noticeable. It plays remarkably like my old Tele. It has a beautiful finish - the older CVs looked like the wood grain was painted on, but on this one the glorious pine grain seems quite real. The one thing that's plainly different is the sound. My old Tele sounds modern and smooth. The CV is gritty and vintagey. But that's what it is supposed to do.

    On the Gibson side, you really notice a difference. My Gibson is a much, much nicer guitar than the Epiphone. But on this side of the fence? I dunno - at least in the CV line, it seems like you're getting something that's really not that much less guitar. And there's little discernible craftsmanship difference from what I can see (though I do prefer the satin finish neck a little.)
     
  19. SpringTank

    SpringTank TDPRI Member

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    I didn't watch the video, but I grasp the concept from what others here have said and I'll echo some of those comments.

    Guitar companies offer different instruments at different price points for different buyers. And while the quality is fantastic of all their instruments (I'm talking FMIC) one can't seriously claim that a Squier is just as good as an American model, Custom Shop or standard production.

    I hear this a lot and to be honest it feels like a thinly veiled justification for those who can't or don't want to afford a higher end model. I don't say that to be rude. Just an honest observation.

    Squires and Fender's Mexican instruments are fantastic high quality instruments, but they are not on par with the American stuff.

    Custom Shop.. that's a whole other ball game. The attention to detail by a human being overseeing the build of your guitar.. that's a whole other topic and quality bracket.

    Lastly, and almost as importantly, let's not forget to include the psychological value of an instrument. How many of us, I know I sure do, add and enjoy a mental value to seeing Fender written on the headstock and knowing their guitar was made in the USA. Every time you pick up that special guitar of yours you smile because it has the right word on it and was made in the right place by the right people. And there's nothing wrong with that. In fact, it makes enjoying your guitar more enjoyable.

    Bit of a rant there boys and a whole lotta typing. Think I'll go strum my Tele for a bit. :D
     
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  20. Martocaster

    Martocaster TDPRI Member

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    I guess we all have our own experience. I had a gold top epiphone that I loved, so much so that I thought I should get a ‘proper’ Gibson. I sold the gold top and bought a Tribute. Now I know that’s the lower end of the Gibson range but it was nearly three times the price of the Epi but nowhere near as good. Unfortunately I’d already sold the gold top chasing the brand name, you live and learn I guess.
     
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