Reason to Buy More Expensive Fender

Discussion in 'Telecaster Discussion Forum' started by RoCkstAr256, Feb 4, 2020.

  1. RoCkstAr256

    RoCkstAr256 Friend of Leo's

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    I known older one were very heavy, tried 3 CV, one strat and two Teles. Fairly light
     
  2. Claptondos

    Claptondos NEW MEMBER!

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    I owned a ’52 reissue butterscotch Tele that unfortunately I sold some years ago. I’ve found a chinese Tokai Breezysound in my local shop (in Madrid, Spain) that was very similar to my ’52. I tested it and found that the playability and quality was really fantastic, although the pickups and electronics was cheap. In the shop the lutier changed the pickups to Fender Nocaster, blind the interior with gold adhesive tape, and changed the pots, wiring and output jack with quality parts (from Fender too). The result is a fantastic Tele in sound, aestetics and playability. In the shop we compared this one with a new ’52 reissue, and the Tokai sounded clearly better. The total price of the guitar with all the mods was 500€ (542 US dollars). I’m really satisfied with my new Tele, it manteins the tuning better than some of the expensive guitars, and I use it along with my US made Strats and Les Pauls. Sometimes you can find bargains like this that worth a test.
     
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  3. apocapsile

    apocapsile TDPRI Member

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    My personal reason for choosing a more expensive model would be "love at first sight" in person and perhaps the idea that it will be more durable, seeing as usually (but not always) there's better quality stuff that's likely to last longer.

    When investing on the long run, I think you have to remember that what you cannot change (by much) is the wood you're getting and the workmanship plus how it all works together as a guitar. I don't mean that in the "get that type o sen ash or that alder" kind of way. Just, you know, how nice and dry and figured if that's the case that wood plank is :)
    A beautiful color/maple drop top that you cannot stop looking at... Perfectly finished parts that feel amazing in your hands.

    Everything else is swappable (ok, even the neck in most Fenders, but let's just assume you're not buying a $2500 to swap the neck for a warmoth :) )

    Frets wear down, pickups/electronics can be changed as the bridge as the tuners and so on. But what you're sure to keep is a great neck with great carve/woods and a beautiful nice quality body.

    So, if the wood/workmanship of the basics justifies the purchase, then, it's worth it, regardless of small flaws or poorer hardware/pickups, IMHO. Sometimes, it comes from the production series, sometimes from the Custom Shop. At times, it comes from copies and other brands. It doesn't really matter, however you have to judge each instrument on an individual basis, I believe.


    ------- RANT BELOW------

    I can offer a bit if insight myself. Scavenging through what was on display in my local store with Fenders, every now and then, there's a nice American-made axe. I specifically remember picking up a vintage-speced special edition of strat (sorry, cannot remember which - the vintage white kind, rosewood board, no relic but vintage custom shop pickups). Man, did it ooze high quality, sturdiness and it was literally playing itself, perfect tension and handling, reassuring (but not unwelcomed) weight. It was around 1.500-1.700 EUR.

    Now, don't get me wrong, I like my CV Esquire and it's a perfectly decent if not outstanding everyday guitar. However, not in terms of sound, but in-hand, the big brother Fender I had tried felt like an "instrument". Not an axe, geetar. Nope, a musical instrument.

    On the other hand, I was discussing with a friend who often does repairs setups fretwork etc. and we were wondering why it is that on many expensive models, there often are weird deformations in the fretboard requiring careful leveling and crowning, many come with shrinked necks etc.
    All of this is usually not true for cheapo or some midrange instruments that are not junk. Ibanez GIO, Squier Bullet (up to CV), many Epiphone cheap models, they can all usually be setup to perfection with some nut adjustments at most and, safe for fret wear (depending on the touch of the user), they pretty much stay that way for long.
     
    Last edited: Feb 15, 2020
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  4. fuman

    fuman TDPRI Member

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    I picked the Fender. I thought it was noticeably better overall, but not worth even twice as much. The Squiers are really good now. It used to be the neck pickup on the Mexican standards was pretty useless, but you can get decent neck tone out of a Squier standard pickup now.
     
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  5. Daddy Hojo

    Daddy Hojo Friend of Leo's

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    Sorry if this has been answered before in the thread, but where do you get Harley Bentons in the US?
     
  6. kodiakblair

    kodiakblair Tele-Meister

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    I'd never heard of Thomann or Harley Benton until 6 years ago,signed on to a German bass players site and folks were mentioning the big "T" so I took a look.

    There I spotted a pretty looking 51 style P-bass for £76 !! With near 40 years playing under my belt the price set alarm bells ringing,nothing that cheap can be playable. It piqued my interest though,what did £76 actually get you these days. Placed the order and a huge box arrived 3 days later.

    Not expecting much I opened it up. Inside was a pretty bass,with a good set up. No sharp frets,no crackly pots or jack socket. 9lb and a very nice neck. It'll sound terrible I thought. Wrong,it sounded great. Stuck a set of TI flats on and it sounded heavenly :)

    6 years later it still sounds heavenly and the stock tuners,pots,jacket socket,strap buttons etc all remain. Who knows how many hours I've logged on that bass but it numbers in the thousands. That £76 bass soon saw more play than my Vigier or Peavey Cirrus basses.

    The Vigiers cost about 30 x the price of the Harley Benton, Cirrus about 15 x. OK something as basic as a single coil P-bass is a whole lot different to a carbon neck active bass but gear is either fit for purpose or not. The PB-50 was definitely fit for purpose.

    You order direct from Thomann,it's their in-house brand.

    https://www.thomann.de/gb/electric_guitars.html
     
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  7. 58Bassman

    58Bassman TDPRI Member

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    I had a Baja Tele- I generally liked the sound but never bonded with the neck. Solid guitar and it was heavy- not sure why they chose that wood, but it was balanced on the strap. I happened to see a Vintage Vibe and it looked great, but the attention to detail wasn’t great- the neck wasn’t set correctly and the high E was at the edge of the fretboard. The hardware wasn’t great, either. The neck, however, seemed to be the same profile as my ‘89 Strat Plus, which I love.

    Cheap guitars CAN be really good out of the box or can be made to be good if someone wants to a little work and spend some money but that begs the question- why didn’t they get it right if it will need work and better hardware? Those gears were bad.
     
  8. SpringTank

    SpringTank TDPRI Member

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    Perhaps you find it offensive because you're reading things that weren't said.

    I said The attention to detail by a human being overseeing the build of your guitar.

    To which you for some reason requested I post a picture of a guitar that was not built by humans. I never claimed there were any. I feel you're being reactionary.
     
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  9. Marblatx

    Marblatx TDPRI Member

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    My first Tele was an 83 USA Fender. my current Tele is an SX. If I had the offer to trade my SX for the 83 with the caveat that I couldn't sell it I'd keep the SX.
     
  10. alnico357

    alnico357 Tele-Holic

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    A guitar can be produced and sold for X$ and be completely adequate. The thousands of $$ above that is ego. I guess ego enhancement is OK if you can pay for it. In a "behind the curtain" test the extra thousands may evaporate, so don't be shocked!
     
    Last edited: Feb 14, 2020
  11. Durtdog

    Durtdog Poster Extraordinaire

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    It's not just country of origin! People keep saying that like it's the deciding factor, intimating there's some kind of racism or "xenophobia" behind wanting a guitar that's made in America.

    The fact is, cheaper guitars are designed with cheaper materials, components and finishing to BE CHEAPER GUITARS, not matter where they're made.

    What is so hard to grasp about that?

    If you like Squiers, that's fine, but don't presume they're exactly the same guitar as a MIA Fender, just made in another country.
     
    Last edited: Feb 15, 2020
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  12. Fishin Musician

    Fishin Musician TDPRI Member

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    It's so subjective. Does that guitar sound thin, or clear? Is it thick & rich, or muddy. Online videos are coo, but not the final word. AND how does it sound on its own, but how does it sound in a band mix?
    My experience is owning a Epiphone ES339 Pro and a Gibson ES339. The Gibson was 5 times more expensive and a MUCH nicer playing guitar, but not really 5 times better. But in the end I sold the Epi.
     
  13. Ripradiant

    Ripradiant Tele-Afflicted

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    There is no question in my mind... buying a US fender in the used market it simply the best value. You get a professional grade instrument which needs zero "mods." If you sinply cant afford a US then buy a mexi for a few hundred. By the time most people "improve" their projects they could have bought the real thing! Squier owners bring it on!
     
  14. grooveiron

    grooveiron Tele-Holic

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    You're right, I misinterpreted and I apologise.
     
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  15. SpringTank

    SpringTank TDPRI Member

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    No worries man. We all have opinions, it can get heated sometimes.
     
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  16. apocapsile

    apocapsile TDPRI Member

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    Well I would never buy US for the sake of it. That overhead better worth it. Sad, but market rules.
     
  17. schmee

    schmee Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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    Yeah, my SX was pretty good really. Some things were a bit funky but very payable!
     
  18. apocapsile

    apocapsile TDPRI Member

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    Unfortunately that was not always the case for some American series (US), because *not all that great* parts were sourced at times and I believe still are. Also, notoriously badly cut nuts, which mess up tuning stability, intonation and general playability. Maybe not in the US but for some export batches. I guess you have to judge each guitar on its own merits, no fullproof options. But nothing that cannot be briefly addressed.
     
  19. Johnnypops

    Johnnypops TDPRI Member

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    Interesting what you say about the necks because my mat and I are both lefties and we both have very nice US strats among others, but I scored a loaded squire body and bought a $30 maple neck off evilbay and as delivered it was like a set of razor blades for frets but I spent 20 minutes dressing those frets (as learnt in a you tube segment either by Shane (in the blues) or Darrell Braun. Gave it to my mate to play and he goes ‘this thing feels amazing’ ....yep plays good for $80. A good neck setup is all the difference In how we judge a guitar. Took me many years to realise that
     
  20. brashboy

    brashboy TDPRI Member

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    WOW...

    If you can take off the tinfoil hat for a few minutes, I'd love to see your evidence for this assertion, which 1) you state as absolute fact, and 2) brand anyone who disagrees as a blind ass.

    I get it: you like--really like--USA Fenders. And the thought that something less expensive might actually sound as good or serve the purpose as well as a Fender really gets on your tit. And so, these comparisons can only be fake.

    Anyway, evidence?
     
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