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Reason for 2 basically identical Telecasters sounding different?

Discussion in 'Telecaster Discussion Forum' started by Digiplay, Jun 13, 2020.

  1. Marblatx

    Marblatx TDPRI Member

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    Mostly pickups and how they are set. Electronics can make a very slight difference. Everything else is negligible.
     
  2. dpang2836

    dpang2836 Tele-Meister

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    Way too many variables that even Custom Shops that are built the same, will sound different. The "Tone" goes up the Strings over a Nut to the Tuners, then down the Neck to Body. Also goes down to Bridge and Saddles to the Body, so lots to make it not the same. I agree Pups, Bridge, Body and Neck wood, etc. may be suspect. Tightness of Neck pocket also can matter. I have built about 40 Custom Tele's and there are inferior parts out there. Too much Zinc/Aluminum alloys being used in Bridges, Saddles, and screws. Resonates the Tone like a Snail out of it's shell. Play On!
     
  3. Maguchi

    Maguchi Tele-Meister

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    It could be the body wood or the neck wood. Even wood that comes from different parts of the same tree can sound different. One part might get more, shade, sunlight or moisture, so the wood could be lighter in weight, drier, more resonant, darker or brighter sounding due to those factors. There is one type of ash, but grown in different climates it has different characteristics. Northern ash grown in colder climates is stiffer and heavier, while swamp ash grown in southern climates is lighter, softer and sounds bright and clear.
     
  4. markxus25

    markxus25 TDPRI Member

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    Hm I would think th different saddles n pickups would account for a lot of th difference. A pretty famous classical/flamenco builder once told me a lot of th sound of any guitar is determined by th node points, ie the bridge/saddle and th nut. Callaham saddles IMO & experience will make a big difference. BTW I prefer 10s or 11s on a Tele, slinky 9s on a Strat. Keep arockin!
     
  5. Bobabilly

    Bobabilly TDPRI Member

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    But he DID have a good point there — there’s a lot of truth to that whole, “It’s all in the hands” thing!
     
  6. dcm0

    dcm0 TDPRI Member

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    Hey Digi, like yr Q's. Just joined here, and just chimed in on your unplugged vs plugged (plugged sez I) thread.

    I'ma say pickups. Saddle material is crucial and a tele should have brass saddles, else go be a schecter or something. My opinion.

    But the Nocaster p'ups are underwound. The texies are over. Hence texies will have higher output, but also higher impedance which generally translates to growlier center mids ( say 400-1200 hz, approx.).

    Whereas your Nocasters will have a more scooped eq, emphasized lows below 200hz give/take, and pronounced highs above 5000hz. With a real valley between. And significantly lower overall output.

    The nature of the machinery.

    Actual mileage, etc. But it's in the magnetics.
     
  7. dcm0

    dcm0 TDPRI Member

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    Hey Digi, everyone else.

    Just posted above saying "p'ups". But if you're on the "unamplified" question again, then first of all, do you know that your body woods are the same? Alder/Ash (that's a biggie)? Is one body one piece, the other maybe bookmatched/glued down the middle?

    Oh yeah, and heck with all that (although serious) stuff. Tele without brass saddles? Oh, you poor dear. That's not a tele, any more than that girl with the pronounced Adams Appular bump on her stubbly throat was your usual "girl".

    Caveat, not being "transphobic" or whatever goofy neologism applies, just suggesting: know your partner, be s/he Telecaster or sidewalk pickup at bartime.

    Nor renders steel saddles unplayable.

    But a tele has brass saddles. 3 of 'em. Which yes, will bloink your intonation twixt the D&G until you finally just bend the damn thing with a pair of pliers.

    But this is worth every bit of headache it entails.

    "Tele" sans brass saddles? Nah. Fender Corruptor Post CBS Vintage Reissue, perhaps. Sure, why not.

    But a Telecaster has brass saddles.

    And won't sound like a tele if'n it don't.

    Period.
     
    Last edited: Jun 18, 2020
  8. Colo Springs E

    Colo Springs E Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    Exactly. Pickups make up the vast majority of a guitar's sound.
     
  9. spikypaddy

    spikypaddy Tele-Afflicted

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    I don't have the answer, but I have noticed the same thing. When I bough my Gibson SG Classic, I had a choice of 3 different ones to try, and they all sounded noticeably different boh plugged in and unplugged. Same model, same stock components, same string brand an guage and both manufactured in the same factory in the same year. I definitely bough the best one, though.
     
  10. vintageampz

    vintageampz Tele-Meister

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    Are you really kidding asking this really lame question considering the facts:
    "I have a 2014 Ash Road Worn 50's Telecaster in Blonde, and upon hearing mine, my guitarist friend decided to buy an identical used 2018 Ash Blonde one.

    They aren't the SAME guitar, weren't made even the same year, let alone same RUN of the SAME Week! OMG!

    The Wood Density is likely DIFFERENT.
    MAY EVEN BE DIFFERENT WOOD, certainly the grain!
    Different PuP's, winders that day, year, wire, bad day, etc etc....
    The FINISH ISN'T THE SAME! (effects the tone as much as the Wood!)
    I could go one for pages.

    The ONLY WAY you can NEARLY assure two guitars are identical in sound is to have ONE Luthier make BOTH next to each other, from the same ~6 feet of lumber blank including the neck wood and have HIM make the PuPs at the same time too!
     
    Last edited: Jun 20, 2020
  11. DrPepper

    DrPepper Friend of Leo's Ad Free Member

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    Two identical guitars sounding different, imagine that....
     
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