Ready to Gig? How to know, what to do...

El Marin

Friend of Leo's
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Mar 19, 2014
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3,016
Location
Spaniard in Pärnu, Estonia, EU
I'd be grateful for some wisdom and advice from the TDPRI hive mind.

Once a guy knows a bunch of chords, pentatonic scales, some blues riffs, a dozen time-honored solos, a bunch of strumming pattern and other guitarish knowledge, then what?

Then you realise that the approach ir completely wrong. You must realise that all that things are NOTHING. I rather see a child who can sing SONGS with the same three chords than your fireworks with no soul and rythm.

Never say "I am good". No, you are not. You are just another learner. Please, be a little humble.

I am reallly tired of people who goes to open mics, start a song and just look at the floor until the lead comes in and then they shoot their room learned solo exactly like Jimmy Hendrix on Little wing and finishing it stop playing again. That's why I always play it in another key, tom puzzle them.

Learn to play FOR THE SONG and WITH THE BAND

Play entire songs. The whole song, from beggining to the end. Make your own songs and sing them.

I've been playing (again) for a year. I know more than I can do, if you know what I mean, but I can take a lead sheet/chord chart and play rhythm along with the band on YouTube for most songs. The problem is making the leap from that to feeling like I can play with others without embarrassing myself.

BS again. Play for fun. Play because you need itr (I need it). Get a band. Play Rock'n'roll, that's it. It doesn't matter embarrasing nobody

How do I know when I'm ready? Different answer for different people, I guess.

You will never know. You will have better days, worse days and remember: "Your worst gig is yet to come"

You will never know but you will do it nomatter that.

How did you know when you were ready?

What makes you think I am ready? I tolod you before, you never know

How good were you when you started getting up with others?

I was 13, it was '84 and I knew three chords and some Chuck Berry songs. I just wanted to drink beer, smoke haschis and get girls... go figure

What do you wish you had known or done before you took the leap?

That singing and playing drunk is not acceptable and not cool. And better is not high technically digitation and notes for minute... Better is attitude and SONGS. That's why the Ramones are much better band than most of the "better players" guitar bands EVER.
And you are nothing. The important is the band.

I am an average guitar player. But my bands are the f*ucking best bands ever

This is a show, never forget that. Work for the show
 

suthol

Friend of Leo's
Joined
Jan 15, 2010
Posts
3,026
Location
The Gong - Australia
In a post above.

Your worst gig is yet to come

Back in 1974 we played on a cruise, spread over three sessions a day we played 8 hours a day for 12 days straight.

First gig back on land was at one of our regular clubs.

Smooth as silk no clams from any of us but totally soulless, felt like we were just going through the motions.

That one rates worse than all of the gigs that had the odd clam but were full of energy and feeling.

Some really had that special swing
 

OmegaWoods

Tele-Afflicted
Joined
Nov 10, 2020
Posts
1,025
Age
54
Location
East TN, USA
@OmegaWoods

Six pages of Bad Dog sagacity.....and you're still here?

Get on with it! Let us know how it goes.......

:cool::D:lol:
Will do. I do have other responsibilities but this thread makes me realize that I'll never be ready and that feeling ready isn't there most important thing.

I used to hate public speaking. I was very nervous when I had to get up and talk to more than a few people. So when the opportunity to become an instructor came up, I took it. Not because I felt ready but because I knew I would have to overcome my fear every day.

It was terrible the first couple of times, now it's great. I still have to prepare, of course, but I look forward to teaching or giving talks now.

This is just like that
 

Dollarart

TDPRI Member
Joined
Nov 30, 2013
Posts
32
Location
Florida
Then you realise that the approach ir completely wrong. You must realise that all that things are NOTHING. I rather see a child who can sing SONGS with the same three chords than your fireworks with no soul and rythm.

Never say "I am good". No, you are not. You are just another learner. Please, be a little humble.

I am reallly tired of people who goes to open mics, start a song and just look at the floor until the lead comes in and then they shoot their room learned solo exactly like Jimmy Hendrix on Little wing and finishing it stop playing again. That's why I always play it in another key, tom puzzle them.

Learn to play FOR THE SONG and WITH THE BAND

Play entire songs. The whole song, from beggining to the end. Make your own songs and sing them.



BS again. Play for fun. Play because you need itr (I need it). Get a band. Play Rock'n'roll, that's it. It doesn't matter embarrasing nobody



You will never know. You will have better days, worse days and remember: "Your worst gig is yet to come"

You will never know but you will do it nomatter that.



What makes you think I am ready? I tolod you before, you never know



I was 13, it was '84 and I knew three chords and some Chuck Berry songs. I just wanted to drink beer, smoke haschis and get girls... go figure



That singing and playing drunk is not acceptable and not cool. And better is not high technically digitation and notes for minute... Better is attitude and SONGS. That's why the Ramones are much better band than most of the "better players" guitar bands EVER.
And you are nothing. The important is the band.

I am an average guitar player. But my bands are the f*ucking best bands ever

This is a show, never forget that. Work for the show

El Marin is right on target. I learned 3 chords when I was 16 and thought I was a star !! When i was 22, my buddies and I had started a band. I even built a stage in our basement and we played parts of all the songs we liked. We had a lot of fun but rarely played a whole song including an intro and ending. It seemed we were all interested in the guitar parts more than me playing rhythm and singing. A local band’s bass player left and they needed a bass player and used ours to fill in… He did well and they hired him. Now he was working and getting paid every week. So we found another bass player to jam with and we wished we could do the same.

We would probably still be in the basement except the band our bass player went with had a double booking a couple of months out and had to find a band to fill in for one of them. They said if we had 40 complete songs ready we could have the job (9:20. To 2:00 AM) we practiced every night and had exactly 40 songs ready to go by the date of the job.

They played a dance club every Saturday night for over a year and that was the job they gave us (they had a wedding booked that paid more) and looking back I don’t imagine it really mattered how we sounded because they could come back the following week and everyone would be glad they were back !!

We were excited and nervous. My knees were shaking while I was singing the first song. When we ended, everyone clapped.. and we had no fear after that !!! We were playing a little different songs than the other band played and we knew a lot of the requested songs that night. The crowd loved us (being new and different had a lot to do with that) and wanted us back again.. and booked us for a year !!!!

The other band was booked until the end of the year (they booked yearly and included New Years Eve) so we were scheduled to start the first week in January. The night we played was in September so we had over 3 months to get ready and we practiced a lot more songs and made sure we learned all the requests from that night that we didn’t know.

We ended up playing there for 2 years and became VERY tight. We left that job because we had so many offers we had to move on and expand. But that job put us together as a group and we were together for 25 years !!

After that, we all started wandering off our own ways, but, until the pandemic the last two years, we got together every Memorial Day for a reunion. Many great memories and still having fun !!

No matter how much you practice, you will never play out until you play out.. period !!! The best advice I can give you is to understand that you play out as a “group”. The “group” sound is what matters.. not what one individual knows or doesn’t know. Put together a group and start booking jobs !!
 

ASATKat

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next to the burn zone
I'd be grateful for some wisdom and advice from the TDPRI hive mind.

Once a guy knows a bunch of chords, pentatonic scales, some blues riffs, a dozen time-honored solos, a bunch of strumming pattern and other guitarish knowledge, then what?

I've been playing (again) for a year. I know more than I can do, if you know what I mean, but I can take a lead sheet/chord chart and play rhythm along with the band on YouTube for most songs. The problem is making the leap from that to feeling like I can play with others without embarrassing myself.

How do I know when I'm ready? Different answer for different people, I guess.

How did you know when you were ready? How good were you when you started getting up with others? What do you wish you had known or done before you took the leap?

Sorry for the open-ended question but I want to be ready but not wait too long, if you get my meaning.

Thanks!!
Imo, you need performance experience.

Join the weekly "solo to a backing track" party here in Twanger Central. There is a whole friendly community.

You can test the waters with what you got, and you can adjust and fine tune your playing. You can also get advise from some very fine players. No public stage shock, no "only one shot at it" live performance.

Do that for a while, great pre-band preparation.
 

OmegaWoods

Tele-Afflicted
Joined
Nov 10, 2020
Posts
1,025
Age
54
Location
East TN, USA
Imo, you need performance experience.

Join the weekly "solo to a backing track" party here in Twanger Central. There is a whole friendly community.

You can test the waters with what you got, and you can adjust and fine tune your playing. You can also get advise from some very fine players. No public stage shock, no "only one shot at it" live performance.

Do that for a while, great pre-band preparation.
Great idea! Thanks!
 

T Prior

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Joined
Mar 17, 2003
Posts
7,417
Location
Charlotte NC
great advice and wisdom above.

Its not how much we know or think we know, its how we apply what we know. We can only do that with other players .

Practicing and learning alone is obviously a requirement , a no brainer , but playing with others is about SONGS , not about how many chords, scales or licks we know.

The very first obstacle when playing with others is do we all like the same songs and music ? We can get 5 great skilled serious players in the same room but if they each don't like the same songs and music its a train wreck.

"Common music" is the thread to playing with others.

You asked, how did we start ?

Practiced at home just like you, chords ,some scales some licks' etc...but for me it was about songs. My first band, 2 guitar players, we both knew all the Ventures songs. Then we added a drummer who knew the songs. Now we had a band.

" LIKE MINDS - LIKE Music " We don't have to be John McLaughlin , we just need to know the chords to a bunch of songs and know how to strum properly "in time"

We need to team up with another player or players who like the same music and songs.

OR we end up with one player knowing all the Eagles songs and the others knowing all the Metallica or AC/DC songs ! :eek:
 

Harry Styron

Friend of Leo's
Joined
Aug 2, 2011
Posts
3,199
Location
Branson, Mo
If I were looking for people to jam with, I’d ask guitar players if I could back them on bass.

Bass players are usually in short supply. Learning bass will instill the fundamentals of playing with others: establishing and maintaining a groove, knowing the chord changes, and knowing that the rest of the band—or just the other guy—is relying on you to keep the song on track. This is the kind of pressure you need.

As you develop your musical relationships, you’ll have opportunities to play guitar.

To make people interested in playing with you, it’s also good to sing leads and harmonies willingly.
 

P Thought

Doctor of Teleocity
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Plundertown (Gasville) OR
I've been wondering over this same question for 40+ years, and now that I've come to the stage of life where most people begin to "age out"...

I know where there's a willing drummer.
 

Jon C

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Joined
Mar 16, 2003
Posts
373
Location
Mid-Atlantic USA
Playing with other musicians is a whole different skill set on top of the inherent and basic musical skills. One without the other is problematic.

I’ve gotten gigs over technically better musicians who lacked other attributes (being on time, getting along with others, etc.).

At some point, dive in and every time will be a learning experience.
 

soundchaser59

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Up The Creek
Iron sharpens iron. Practice with the band and you'll get that thing called confidence. Don't forget to have fun!
You have to play with the band. That will give you a chance to develop something that you will never get playing by yourself with records. But you haven't arrived until you savor the experience of royally screwing up on stage and having to keep going as if nothing is wrong, then the next song believe that you are once again a decent guitar player.
 




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