Re-attaching the neck

Discussion in 'Tele-Technical' started by DLReed, Feb 16, 2020.

  1. DLReed

    DLReed Tele-Meister

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    This may seem like an obvious answer but as long as the neck screws go in without resistance is the neck properly aligned? Is it harmful to remove and re-attach the neck a lot?

    I wish I played my guitars half as much as I worry about them. hahaha
     
  2. theprofessor

    theprofessor Friend of Leo's

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    Whether the neck is properly aligned depends on where the holes are drilled in the neck and where they are drilled in the body. Just because there are four holes drilled in the neck doesn't mean it will be properly aligned. It might be, or it might not.

    It's not necessarily harmful to remove and re-attach the neck a lot, but the holes in the neck will eventually enlarge so that the screws no longer bite into the wood. At that point, you'll either need to fill the holes and re-drill, or you'll have to put in metal inserts and use machine screws to attach the neck instead of wood screws.
     
  3. dreamingtele

    dreamingtele Friend of Leo's

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    if you're taking the neck off and re attaching everyday, then it becomes a problem.. I never had any problem taking one neck off and putting it on a different body to find a match.. as long as Im using the same screws.. but once I find a good match, I rarely take it off.. maple is hard, but wood is wood, and will eventually wear out
     
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  4. DLReed

    DLReed Tele-Meister

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    That makes sense. I will trust that it was drilled properly from the factory and try not to second guess myself.
     
  5. moosie

    moosie Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    With these, and another screws into hardwood, start the screw by turning it backwards, slowly, until you feel it 'drop' into place. This way you keep using the first threads that were cut, instead of cutting new ones, and wearing out the sidewalls.
     
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  6. Switchy

    Switchy Tele-Holic

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    It doesn't hurt to put a drop of wood glue on the screw when you thread it in. It makes for a stronger hold, and actually makes the hole stronger versus stripping out.
     
  7. moosie

    moosie Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    Re neck alignment, once the screws are tight, and the strings on, to pitch, then sight the E strings. Are they even on the sides of the neck, roughly? If not, loosen the screws slightly, not too much because you're still under tension. You may feel the neck slip back, deeper into the pocket. This is a good thing. Then, whack the neck with the heel of your hand, near the nut, to move it sideways, bringing the strings into alignment with the edges of the neck.

    Tighten the screws, retune, and reintonate.

    But don't drive yourself nuts over this. If you never did this, it wouldn't matter.
     
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  8. AndyPanda

    AndyPanda Tele-Holic

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    When I'm putting screws back into a neck, I turn the screw backwards with my finger until I feel the screw threads drop down into the start of the threads in the neck. Then I start the screw with fingers so I know I'm following the old threads in the wood.

    Then I don't tighten it all the way yet (snug it up) ... put the strings on and look at the edges of the fretboard to see how the strings line up -- you can back the neck screws off 1/8 turn and wiggle the neck side to side until the strings are lined up with the edge of the neck like they should be - then tighten the neck screws and your neck should be aligned.
     
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  9. charlie chitlin

    charlie chitlin Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

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    If you're taking the neck off regularly to travel or something, a little beeswax or soap on the screws will help them go easy on the wood.
     
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  10. Ricky D.

    Ricky D. Doctor of Teleocity

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    The first time you have the neck off, check that the holes in the body are the correct size. Those holes must allow for a clearance fit on the screws. The screw should pass through freely so the threads do not engage the body. If the threads bite the body, they will bind and the neck will not draw in tight. The correct diameter for the body holes is 11/64".

    With clearance holes in the body, there will be a little freedom of movement. Just make sure the string line up correctly over the neck as you tighten things up.
     
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  11. Vizcaster

    Vizcaster Poster Extraordinaire

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    Can't really add to Moosie's advice, which is dead on. But just to beat a dead horse, consider that the through-holes in the body are larger than the neck bolts (screws) for several reasons. First, you don't want the threads binding there in the body, they should only be grabbing the neck in order to pull the two parts together. Second, it allows the 'chiropractor' trick described above in order to align the strings. So they shouldn't, and can't guarantee perfect alignment just because of where the holes are drilled.
     
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  12. boris bubbanov

    boris bubbanov Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

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    Every time you remove and replace a neck, you're liable to slightly improve or diminish the performance. But the change is often very subtle.

    But yeah, relax. Having confidence in your ability to do this, is priceless I think.
     
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