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Rattlesnakes

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by jumpnblues, Feb 7, 2018.

  1. dkmw

    dkmw Poster Extraordinaire

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    Yeah, we got 'em. Big fat eastern diamondbacks and their little pigmy rattler cousins.

    The little guys actually do more harm because they are still occasionally found in residential areas where they can bite pets and little kids. I know a kid who almost lost a finger to the infection/rot resulting from a Pygmy bite.

    If you get away from civilization around here, there's still healthy populations of the big guys. I walked up on one a few years ago in the Everglades. I heard the rattle and looked down just in time to avoid being struck. Luckily I know that sound. Also lucky I was walking in front of my wife and son.
     
  2. charlie chitlin

    charlie chitlin Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

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    I have a rattlesnake rattle in my '36 Duolian.
    Adds mojo.
     
  3. O- Fender

    O- Fender Tele-Afflicted

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    I live in the Niagara area of Ontario. I have been told there are Massassauga rattlers around. Not far away is a Rattle Snake Road. I have never seen any sign of one and nobody from this area I've talked to has ever seen one. The only exception is 20 years ago my sister and bro in law saw a couple but they know a gov't biologist who was studying them.
     
  4. Area51

    Area51 Tele-Holic

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    Yep, in fall and early spring they like to warm up on the edges of the trails and roads. Never bothered me, I just walk past them. The only time I ever seen one rattle is after I rode over him on my mountain bike. But it's not like it tried to chase me or anything.l
     
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  5. 6stringcowboy

    6stringcowboy Friend of Leo's

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    Rattler's, moccasin's, and copperhead's round here, though I've never seen a rattler in the wild. When I lived in Fl. there were huge diamond backs , coral snakes and moc's a plenty. I had a job that was close to a levee/dike on the everglades and during the cooler months wed go there for lunch an count the moccasins out sunning themselves. Creepy how many there were.
     
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  6. LutherBurger

    LutherBurger Poster Extraordinaire

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    Only the two-legged, suit-and-tie-wearing kind.
     
  7. Toto'sDad

    Toto'sDad Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Over on Green Horn, and up around Tobias peak, I've only seen the skinny ones. Over on Breckenridge Mountain, that's another story. I've seen them over there as big around as a man's wrist. The fat ones often aren't any longer, just really large in diameter. I don't like snakes of any kind, but I won't harm a rattlesnake unless it's a threat to me, then I won't think twice about dispatching it.
     
  8. Ducerro

    Ducerro Tele-Holic

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    I've seen lots Copperheads - they're literally everywhere on our property. Feral cats keep them at bay around the house. Found a Coral snake in the vineyard once. My neighbors have found Rattlesnakes, though I have yet to encounter one. No Water Moccasins on our property, but then again we don't have a tank (that's a pond for y'all who don't know the lingo here). Scorpions? Have to spray for those once a month or so at the winery. Adult daughter got stung by one last year. Not a fond memory. See one - kill it.
     
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  9. teletimetx

    teletimetx Doctor of Teleocity

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    Yeah we got 'em, too. Rattlers mostly, to the west of here. Copperheads and water moccasins are around as well, but I've never seen any - not that I was looking. Seen a few on or near the roads in my travels.

    Had a cat catch a coral snake in the monkey grass. Coral snakes only bite in defense, from what I've heard, and have to have a pretty good lock on before their venom does much. And yeah, there's the coral-snake look alike in these parts as well ("...red touches black, safe for Jack, red touches yellow, kills a fellow...")

    scorpions, the vinegaroon, fire ants, the hardhead catfish, plenty of stuff that ruin yer afternoon...
     
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  10. mnutz

    mnutz Tele-Afflicted

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    http://thesouthern.com/news/local/s...e_da1ca840-89bc-11e7-895f-73ed5e268af9.html#1

    I lived for 10 years just a few miles north of "Snake Road" in southern Illinois. This area has one of the hardest highest concentrations of venomous snakes in North America.

    The road separates a swamp from cliffs, and the snakes and critters cross it seasonally. The road is closed during migration. Mostly to protect the critters from rednecks playing whack-a-mole in their trucks.

    I've walked the road many times, at night even. Fascinating wildlife!

    Most of my free time was spent rock climbing in the area. I had a few close encounters. Pulling up onto a ledge and getting an up close surprise.

    My cabin was IN the swamp/woods. It was crawling with snakes, you'd see them hanging in the trees right outside the window. Also had tree frogs climbing up the window glass. A whole family of raccoons frequently sat on the porch with me, and dozens of smooth soft shell turtles would hangout on the fallen logs right across from my driveway.

    When I moved into the cabin, it had been unoccupied for many years. It had critters living in it, including rattlesnakes. I slept in a tent while I was renovating and removing critters.

    My first experiences with venomous snakes came when I was very young. My grandparents lived in a very remote canyon area of eastern Wyoming. Thick with rattlesnakes. My grandma had a huge collection of rattles that she kept displayed in jars in her front room. Most she had shot off the porch, encounters were frequent.

    I remember hiking a canyon with my dad when I was about 8 years old. He told me to not move, while he killed a rattlesnake that I'd almost stepped on. He always hiked with a snake stick.

    We didn't have rattlers at our house, but we did have bull snakes. I was removing them from the house for my mom from a very young age.

    Later on I worked for a general contractor in northern Nebraska. We did lots of remote jobs and carried a shotgun with us for snakes. We were hired to de-snake a house once. Pulled the drop ceiling out and rattlesnakes were dropping from the ceiling. Bagged them up and relocated them. Then we snake proofed the house.

    I kept 2 pythons as pets for many years. I sold them when I moved from the swamps of southern Illinois to the mountains of Colorado.

    Yeah I've got a long history with snakes, both venomous and not. I don't mind them and mostly they don't mind me, or any other humans. They are incredibly useful and fascinating animals.
     
  11. hemingway

    hemingway Poster Extraordinaire

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    My aunt was bitten by an adder once. It was her own stupid fault. She had to be choppered to hospital for treatment.

    Most people in the UK will never see one.
     
  12. Rustbucket

    Rustbucket Poster Extraordinaire Platinum Supporter

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    When I was a kid, we had one find it’s way into our kitchen. My dad killed it with a long BBQ fork. AJ was much more rural back then in the 80’s.
     
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  13. william tele

    william tele Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    I've read several talk about pygmy rattlers. These are the ones that seem to me to be one of the most likely to cause you harm. Reason being, they lurk in berry bushes and are small enough and camo enough to be invisible until it's too late.

    Had a friend in the service in South Carolina that was bitten exactly like that...picking berries. He kept his hand but went through hell and was actually very sick for a long time. Scary little creatures.
     
  14. Teleterr

    Teleterr Friend of Leo's

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    I m waiting for Australia to chime in...
    No poisonous snakes here on the peninsula (actually island) below the canal. Supposedly there are copperheads , but in all the time I ve been traipsing thru the woods, neither I nor any nature loving or hunting friends have seen one.
     
  15. dkmw

    dkmw Poster Extraordinaire

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    My grandmother, who I loved dearly, hated all snakes and would seize any opportunity to kill one. A hoe was her weapon of choice. She'd chop them into pieces to make sure they were good and dead.

    I once tried to explain to her that there were snakes that were ok, that she didn't have to kill them all.

    I recall she listened patiently but the next time she saw a snake she ran and grabbed a hoe :eek:
     
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  16. Toto'sDad

    Toto'sDad Telefied Ad Free Member

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    When I was in the eight grade, our class went on a field trip to Shark's Tooth Mountain east of Bakersfield Ca. We all lived in a small town probably forty miles from the site and of course rode a school bus to get there. Some sort of pipe ran across a trail we were on about 18 inches high and maybe a foot in diameter and the first kid to come to it was a particularly haughty young lady by the name of Evelyn. I was right behind her, and just as she started to step over the pipe I noticed a small rattler coiled and seemingly ready to strike. I grabbed Evelyn around the waist and jerked her back. When I sat her back down on the ground she slapped my face and told me to keep my hands to myself. I pointed to the rattler that was still coiled and by this time was giving off the tell tail sign of rattling.

    By this time the other kids had all gathered around and were looking at the snake, the teacher/chaperone rounded us up and guided us to another point to continue across the pipe, and we went on about our business. I don't think that little gal ever did thank me or apologize for slapping me, but that was just Evelyn.
     
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  17. BorderRadio

    BorderRadio Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

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    "This a bit of a Rattlesnake..."

     
  18. TeleTucson

    TeleTucson Tele-Afflicted

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    Like Nickadermis, I have rattlesnakes routinely in our property. Several kinds, usually diamondbacks but also tiger rattlers frequently. A few of the many species in AZ are protected, but not those.

    My wife and I are both very strong supporters of wildlife, but it's hard to manage these on your property when you have pets. Our dog has been to "rattlesnake school" but still was bit when she jumped into a bush chasing a lizard. $1500 of antivenin and vet bills later, she was good as new, save the scar, so we were lucky that time.

    You can call up to get one "removed" by local agencies, but they bring it < 1/8 mile or so from where you found it so it doesn't die trying to find home. That doesn't do much good, however, as they are then back in the same place soon enough and putting your pets (and possibly yourself) at risk.

    We deal with 3 or 4 up close and personal each season. Sometimes you walk out a door and bingo, there's one waiting for you right where you were going to step! I have no angst about them, as you can spot them if you've trained yourself to keep your eyes open. You know what they say - the most common words before a rattlesnake bite are, "Here, hold my beer!" ;):D
     
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  19. troy2003

    troy2003 Friend of Leo's

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    Yowza, I’ll live in the land of ice and snow instead of all the snakes. I hate them. Seriously. I don’t like looking at them, even in a zoo.
     
  20. dkmw

    dkmw Poster Extraordinaire

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    When the Australians get on this thread they can "win"; they have multiple snakes that can kill you FAST.

    Our coral snakes are the most dangerous here in Florida. But in all the time I've spent out in the wild I've only seen three.

    We have a couple of million alligators and plenty of sharks too!
     
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