RANT!!! MY "BABY" BROTHER IS HOME, I'M NOT LOOKING FORWARD TO THIS.

dlew919

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These lines made me laugh pretty damn hard.

I'm sorry about your brother. I have a sister I haven't spoken to in over a decade, so I can relate.

BTW, I could easily be wrong, but it seems to me like there are lots of Scots with Aussie family and vice versa. Is that a thing? Are lots of Aussies from a Scottish lineage?
A member of the clans McLeod and McSwan here. 5 generations down though. My mother’s mother’s family were high Kirk scots. Dads family were Irish Catholics.
 

trev333

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My Dad's long time work mate and fishing buddy was in the Sutherland clan ... but we didn't know much about that...other than his name..

around retirement age he received a rather large inheritance of some sort from Scotland....as one of the last of a long line...

Didn't change his lifestyle much and still went fishing/camping with Dad. Didn't buy a new car, boat or caravan.

I could ring him for a chat and ask any advice after Dad had passed.

A good man.
 

deepintheblues

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All 6' 5" 280lbs of my brother arrived on Saturday. He's here for a month.

He flew in from Sydney to Edinburgh the long way because it was cheaper (Sydney-Arizona-NYC-Edinburgh). He got delayed for 36 hours in NYC so he was properly 'pickled' when he arrived and I'll be surprised to see him anything less than 'paralytic' while he's here.
(Background: in Scotland we have more words for drunk than the Innuit have for snow).

The last time he was here 3 years ago for my auld fella's 80th he left utter chaos. A major fisticuffs at my auld fella's party after my brother dropped my eldest grand-daughter on her head.
Miraculously I didn't get involved; I was too busy making sure my daughter and grand kid were all right; however, the incident lit the touch paper for all the other siblings and partners to air their frustrations with him and each other, resulting in the church hall became like a scene from "The Quiet Man".

I'm as angry (still) with certain people for using that situation for their own ends.

I'll do my best to avoid him while he's here but there are some unavoidable situations where I'll have to see him.

My daughter has decided to have all 4 of her kids Baptised in the Catholic Church in few weeks time. We have organised a party afterwards in the church hall and had no idea at the time that my brother was going to be in Scotland.

Not inviting him isn't possible; there are certain people in our very large family who find my loud, opinionated. obnoxious, 24/7 drunk brother endearing and this will cause major rifts that my daughter can do without because she lives next to the majority of the family.

No doubt having a talk with my brother before the event will be something I'll have to do. However, on the evidence of me already repeatedly telling him to no avail that phoning me when he's 'three sheets' is unacceptable, I have no doubt whatsoever any talk I have with him will not be well received.
It's highly possible, I'll have to convey my message in a language he understands.

I'm getting too old for this man child sibling.

Rant over.

Sympathies. I’m half Scottish on my dads side. Any get together 3 things will happen.

Smoking drinking and fighting even at funerals.
 

wangdaning

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I have plenty of drunks in my family, and I am also kind of the drunk in my generation. That being said, I do not play physical games with other people's children, or even my own when I am drunk past a certain point. I can kind of see how the event might have went down and I think it has a lot to do with his size and the children egging him on (If I am completely wrong forgive me, but it is kind of putting my experience over your story).

My uncle was like that, he was really big and we could get him to spin, throw us in the air, hold us up dangerously over things. Several times children were dropped in rather deep water and uncle not being a great swimmer could not help. The same type of anger came out in these cases, but I think the intention was not evil. I could swim fairly young, so would ask him to keep throwing me in, maybe he just could not get that not all of my cousins were me.

I really don't think harm was meant, and I have witnessed other families and people in similar situations. As far as a baptism, maybe have a straight talk that it is your grandchildren communing with God and he could at least refrain from drinking more than a beer or two in the morning.

If he can make it through the ceremony, then you just have to worry about the party after.
 

Flyboy

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Edinburgh Scot here. Never happened to me (almost did) but family gatherings are often a release valve for various relatives and members of extended families. I've heard of the horrific wedding fights and emotional funeral fights. I'd get him on his own and have a word.
 

knavel

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Reading this I feel very fortunate that I speak to my brothers almost daily and that I've never seen a fight or even an argument at gatherings. Drinking doesn't really run in my family (despite my best efforts).

Good idea getting the children baptized by the way. My children were able to get fiercely fought over entry into an Ofsted Outstanding rated state Catholic school because of their baptism certificates. It's always good to have options.
 

Fendereedo

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Drunks are no fun, and I was one. The thing to do is get your heads together as a family, and put your brother to one side and tell him, whether he kicks off, or not that you aren't prepared to put up with his behaviour any longer. My family did it to me when I was the biggest PITA going, I had lost a lot of friends along the way too, but was also going to lose my wife and kids too. He really needs to know what an absolute arsehole he is being, and warn him that you are going to cut him loose for good, if he continues with his drunken lifestyle.
 

dougstrum

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Adult siblings with substance and/or mental illness can cause a lot of family pain and mayhem.
Hopefully your talk before the babtism will keep a bit of a lid on things. Perhaps you can get through the month without major incident~
 

Kandinskyesque

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BTW, I could easily be wrong, but it seems to me like there are lots of Scots with Aussie family and vice versa. Is that a thing? Are lots of Aussies from a Scottish lineage?
The most obvious connection is in the place names Perth WA is named after the town/city of Perth in Scotland. A lot of the towns and areas around Sydney are named after areas in Glasgow eg. Drumoyne: a suburban town in NSW and also a place in Glasgow where the cops don't go at night. Where my brother lives I've seen a sign on a bus terminus called Hampden which is also the name for the national soccer stadium in Glasgow.

Australia was used as a penal colony for UK and Irish n'er do wells. Which means some Australians are not only the descendants of UK/Irish convicts but also prison guards ;).

The influx of Scottish to Australia has been fairly consistent, even to the extent that in the 1960/70s there was a £10 'passport' allowing UK families to emigrate to create a new life with plenty work.
The parents of teenage Angus and Malcolm Young (AC/DC), Jimmy Barnes, Colin Hay (Men at Work), all used this scheme.
In the 1950s the parents of 4 y/o Ronald Belford Scott (Bon Scott) did the same.

As for @Red Ryder's comment, it's very accurate.
Our family are part of the Irish diaspora; my parents moved to Glasgow from Ireland as kids. My mother's uncles and aunts spread a bit further afield; one to Australia, one to Toronto and 2 became cops in NYC.

The movement of Scots to other English speaking countries is still fairly common.
I've about a dozen friends, including the drummer from my old band who moved to Sydney in their 20s.
Mrs K and I nearly emigrated about 15 years ago when her old employer Dell gave her the chance of moving to either Sydney or Austin Texas. Unfortunately my own drinking at the time made that too difficult.

There's still the prospect of Mrs K and I spending 3-4 months per year abroad due to her work.
If not for the pandemic and my own health (on the mend), we'd be residents of Carlsbad CA for 3-4 months per year and it looks like that might be on the cards from 2023 onwards, starting with Mrs K going there for a month this October.

I've probably done my Aspie, "too much information" thing again.
Apologies!!!:eek:
 

dlew919

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The most obvious connection is in the place names Perth WA is named after the town/city of Perth in Scotland. A lot of the towns and areas around Sydney are named after areas in Glasgow eg. Drumoyne: a suburban town in NSW and also a place in Glasgow where the cops don't go at night. Where my brother lives I've seen a sign on a bus terminus called Hampden which is also the name for the national soccer stadium in Glasgow.

Australia was used as a penal colony for UK and Irish n'er do wells. Which means some Australians are not only the descendants of UK/Irish convicts but also prison guards ;).
the scots were the actual hard crime. Sending their life servers (as opposed to the indentured free labour from the rest of the uk)
 

WRHB

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These lines made me laugh pretty damn hard.

I'm sorry about your brother. I have a sister I haven't spoken to in over a decade, so I can relate.

BTW, I could easily be wrong, but it seems to me like there are lots of Scots with Aussie family and vice versa. Is that a thing? Are lots of Aussies from a Scottish lineage?
My grandmother said her grandmother left Ireland during the Potato Famine. She said the two most common options for the Irish were Australia or the United States because there was work available in both places. Her grandmother was offered work as a housekeeper in both countries. Thank God she chose the States because I couldn’t imagine growing up in Australia. Those folks have an accent.
 

bettyseldest

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I last saw my brother six years ago at my daughter's wedding. From the right, my wife, yours truly, my brother's third wife, our kid, my first wife and her partner, now husband. The next day they drove off and we never had the chance to meet up again. He went back to work in Malta, followed by Kenya and finally to Myanmar where he was trapped by COVID and the military coup, for over a year, escaping to the Philippines only to die there a few weeks later in May of last year. Our kid was never much bother, though his first two wives were to be avoided if at all possible.

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The reception was held at a local historic barn, about five miles out of town, with no nearby accommodation or public transport options. They brought in outside caterers and stocked the bar themselves. The day before the wedding, my son-in-law to be asked where he should buy a couple of dozen bottles of spirits. I pointed out that as most of his 100 guests would be driving, and he already had four barrels of beer, 120 bottles of wine and 48 of champagne, he would probably be better off spending a couple of hundred quid on soft drinks. Not just cola and orange juice, but nice stuff to interest the drivers and encourage people not to spoil my daughter's big day. He took some of my advice, other than a glass of Champagne and one of wine I drank Elderflower cordial or Ginger beer all night, but he still bought a dozen bottles of spirits.

He had a drink or three before the church ceremony, then he and his parents both drank more thank a bottle of wine each with their meal. About an hour after the photo was taken he started an argument with the 85 year old father of my ex-wife's partner. Pushed the old man to the floor. My ex threw a cup of tea over him, he threw a punch at my ex, missing her but hitting her partner in the face. He then screamed at my daughter to "get that F***ing woman out of here". It was five years before he allowed my daughter to have any contact with her mother.

My own wedding was less fraught. Whilst I only invited friends, my Irish catholic wife felt she had to invite all her family. Being one of eight, that's lot of them. Just as the musician was about to end his his first set a fight broke out. One of my wife's brothers and his son were throwing punches. Both ex-boxers and judo black belts, they had been goaded by another family member. Thankfully my relatively small best man threw himself between the combatants, and the musician offered to do a few more songs, so we quickly got everyone back onto the dancefloor.

I don't know what it is about big families, in my wife's family they only seem to be friends with half of their siblings at any one time. They could be really close for a few years, then sworn enemies for the next five or ten, then back to best buddies again. They don't seem to value what they have. My brother spent his last twenty five years as an expat, working in Saudi, Sudan, Nigeria, Kenya, Iraq, Libya, Tunisia, Malta, and Myanmar, with only six months in the UK, but when we met we had a good time together. We might not phone each other for a year, but it always felt as if we had seen each other the previous week. I miss him, but feel I have gained a sister, three kids, on step son, seven grandkids on step grand daughter and eight great grandkids, which is pretty good.
 

scottser

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Ahhh, the Irish.
please excuse yourself, it's the scots that can't hold their drink and get themselves into a tizzy about things. us irish would bear it all with good grace and humour, probably get a decent song out of it too.
as for the OP's problem, i can heartily recommend rohypnol for your problematic little brother.
/s/
 

Flyboy

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My grandmother said her grandmother left Ireland during the Potato Famine. She said the two most common options for the Irish were Australia or the United States because there was work available in both places. Her grandmother was offered work as a housekeeper in both countries. Thank God she chose the States because I couldn’t imagine growing up in Australia. Those folks have an accent.
'sake, man. What post!!:mad:
 




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