1. Win a Broadcaster or one of 3 Teles! The annual Supporting Member Giveaway is on. To enter Click Here. To see all the prizes and full details Click Here. To view the thread about the giveaway Click Here.

radius blocks...

Discussion in 'Tele Home Depot' started by szechuanking, May 14, 2010.

  1. szechuanking

    szechuanking Tele-Holic

    Posts:
    516
    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2010
    Location:
    new jersey
    anybody have a process for making radius blocks. seems like a silly thing to spend money on with this heap of scrap i've got laying around.
     
  2. Nick JD

    Nick JD Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

    Posts:
    17,552
    Joined:
    May 12, 2007
    Location:
    Queensland, Australia
    I've found radius blocks are better than gym membership. Not being one for repetitive (and slightly inaccurate) and laborious tasks I found it better and easier to build a jig to radius the fretboard directly. The other advantage of this is if you abstract the radius from the tool you can use it for any radius.

    I built one quite similar to this below, because the jig to make sanding blocks is just as much effort as the jig to radius fretboards. After routing the fretboard can be cleaned up with hand-held sandpaper - the trick is to do "meat removal" passes first, and then take another 1/32 off on the second runs.

     
  3. szechuanking

    szechuanking Tele-Holic

    Posts:
    516
    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2010
    Location:
    new jersey
    that looks like risky business.
     
  4. rcole_sooner

    rcole_sooner Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    6,603
    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2010
    Location:
    Oklahoma City, OK
    On one of the 2010 contest builds, the guy made radius blocks by using the cardboard cement pillar forms they sell at HD or Lowes. He used the convex radius of the form to sand a concave radius into a block. He had a few other tricks too.
     
  5. crazydave911

    crazydave911 Doctor of Teleocity

    Age:
    61
    Posts:
    11,473
    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2010
    Location:
    East Tennessee
    Safer than using a table saw, for anything. That's very versatile, and simple, but that's me :)

    Dave
     
  6. NateM

    NateM TDPRI Member

    Posts:
    31
    Joined:
    Apr 9, 2010
    Location:
    Los Alamos, New Mexico
    I made mine by setting a dowel in a flat piece of plywood and drilling holes the same size as the dowel in a 2x4. Then I clamped the piece of plywood to a bandsaw table and swung the 2x4 through the blade going from hole to hole. By drilling the holes the radius away from the blade that I wanted the block's radius to be I got a very accurate curve cut in the block. Then I glued the pieces of 2x4 together and that was what I used for radiusing my board.

    If you go this way I would use a 3/4" inch blade in the bandsaw. I started with a 1/2" blade and got a lot of bend in the curve which ruined one block I made. The larger blade worked much better.
     
  7. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

    Posts:
    23,373
    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2003
    Location:
    Ontario County
    Mount a router to the end of a long board 18" or so. Measure from the center of cutter down the board the length of the radius you want..ie 11.75 inches. Drill a hole there ( 1/4). Place a 1/4 dowel pin in that hole. The pin is a pivot point. Get some material like plywood. Layout where you want to rout that arc and drill another 1/4 hole in the plywood to receive the pin. When the router is on, you sweep the router across the arc and the bit cuts into the plywood. If you did a complete circle you end up with a round table top. The scrap can be cut up and glued face to face to make a sanding radius block. This is how Norm Abrams makes a round table top on his show.
    Remember the cutter diameter needs to be considered as the outer diameter makes the sanding radius.
     
  8. kec!

    kec! Tele-Holic

    Posts:
    682
    Joined:
    May 3, 2010
    Location:
    SoCal
  9. Nick JD

    Nick JD Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

    Posts:
    17,552
    Joined:
    May 12, 2007
    Location:
    Queensland, Australia
    How are you making the rest of the neck? It's probably the least-risky part of neck making ... not to mention it's also the most important part to do right - hence making a jig for it.

    Hand held blocks to put radii into necks will not do a perfect job. You will probably be taking a lot more off your frets when you have to L&C the neck to compensate for the areas where you sanded more or less.

    If I gave you a radiused neck and a flat sanding block ... do you think you could sand a flat radius into it? Perfectly flat? I couldn't...
     
  10. SacDAve

    SacDAve Poster Extraordinaire

    Age:
    69
    Posts:
    7,386
    Joined:
    Dec 23, 2009
    Location:
    Rocklin Ca.
    Hears a jig I built pretty self-explanatory. You have to make sure your stock fits snug but you can still feed it threw. Make the block a little longer than you want the last inch will need to be trimmed. I can change the pins for deferent radiuses the bit dept adjustment is your a fine adjustment. The router is mounting on a 6” metal track for steel studs. Anyway I found a use for the best router I’ve ever owned 1970 craftsman it’s jus plug and go but it goes .
     

    Attached Files:

  11. Nick JD

    Nick JD Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

    Posts:
    17,552
    Joined:
    May 12, 2007
    Location:
    Queensland, Australia
  12. SacDAve

    SacDAve Poster Extraordinaire

    Age:
    69
    Posts:
    7,386
    Joined:
    Dec 23, 2009
    Location:
    Rocklin Ca.
  13. finntele1000

    finntele1000 Tele-Meister

    Posts:
    160
    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2009
    Location:
    Finland
IMPORTANT: Treat everyone here with respect, no matter how difficult!
No sex, drug, political, religion or hate discussion permitted here.