markal

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I've now done a few gigs with the Cub, using two different guitars and all three pre-amp channels, and I'm highly impressed and very satisfied with my purchase. There seems to be no lack of clean headroom and the amp is an excellent pedal platform. My choice has been 100% justified.
Knowing you played and liked the older and newer versions of the Blues Cubes, how does the Cub compare?
 

Happy Enchilada

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Here's all I got to say:

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And if you email Quiter, Pat his self will reply - usually inside a day. Where else do you get that level of service?
 

Tony474

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Knowing you played and liked the older and newer versions of the Blues Cubes, how does the Cub compare?
Good question. The original Blues Cube BC-60 from the late '90s is a tremendous-sounding amp, with masses of character and great flexibility of tonality through its presence control and bright switch. Note: I only ever use the "clean" channel, since any overdrive or distortion I very occasionally use comes from outboards, such as my Fulldrive 2 and/or Turbo Rat. However, the downside is that it is very heavy at around 44 lbs. which is pretty outrageous for a 1x12 solid state combo amp (the 3x10 version I also once had was obviously even heavier). Since I'm getting old and a bit feeble now, much as I love it I rarely gig it any more.

The only "new" Blues Cube I've played through is my pal's BC Hot. Also a nice-sounding amp, and I've been tempted to get one, but I'm not sorry I didn't in the end. And it isn't all that heavy, but still ~40% more than the Quilter.

It's still relatively early days for me with the Aviator Cub, and so far I'm still finding the optimal settings to use with my various guitars. But it's very satisfying to use, has more than adequate clean headroom and a voiced line out in case I need to slave it through the PA. The build quality seems solid and of course its very light weight is an absolute boon. And that's with the standard ceramic-magnet speaker. I wonder how much more weight might have been saved by using one with a neodymium magnet. Maybe they thought of that but couldn't find one of suitable tonality or efficiency.

Anyway, bottom line is that the Aviator Cub suits me very well alongside the Roland and other analogue SS amps I own.
 

dankilling

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Joined the club. Still sorting out the best speaker combo to use with this, but it seems to need a bright-but-not-harsh speaker to get the best out of it.
 

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Ben Harmless

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Just joined the club, and so far, I'm quite happy, though it's early days.

I got a little anxious with the potential tube situation going on, and I've been wanting a backup for awhile. My "main" amp these days is a Marshall DSL20H on an orange 1x12 or 2x12 with Eminence Cannabis Rexs. That was a compromise from dragging around the JCM800 half stack that I used for almost 20 years. Actually, I built a clone, and used both of them for a little while. I was in better shape then. My point is that I've always been a tube amp guy, and I know what they do.

So, I got the Tone Block 202 as both a backup, and a problem-solver. I play around the Boston area a lot, and there are weird little spots that aren't always easy to load into, and the parking is a major issue. Plus, I'm more focused on songwriting and performance these days than I am about being excited about my guitar amp. I had low expectations of the quilter with regard to any sort of overdriven tone, so I planned to use a pedal and just cope. As it turns out, I don't need to. Is it the same as my Marshalls? No. Do I care? Not much. For those who worry about whether it "sounds like a tube amp," I would challenge them and ask if they think that all tube amps sound one way? What doesn't it sound like? A giant Ampeg? A Twin? An AC30? It sounds and feels as different from those amps as they do from each other, and no one is ever going to listen to my music and say "you know, this would be a good song if only the guitar on the left was using some sort of tube amp instead of a Quilter."

Side benefit: My bass player just got a fantastic Fender Rumble bass amp, which is so light damn near needs a paperweight to stay in place, and sounds amazing. My drummer just bought some space-age hardware that weighs half as much as the old stuff, and fits in a smaller bag. It's only the other guitar player who's left with her Hot Rod Deville and grumbles under her breath during load-in. She actually lifted my amp last night, and the Marshall and 1x12 cab together weigh less than her amp. The Quilter is nothing in comparison. We're living in the future, folks! I will never have to get in shape again!
 

Peegoo

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I've owned a Quilter Aviator Gold 1x8 combo for the better part of 10 years. It is a little beast of an amp and has no trouble keeping up with other players using large, heavy 1x12 and 2x12 combos.

It's 100 watts x 2 through an 8" Celestion in a closed-back cab. It really punches hard for an amp that's smaller than a blackface Princeton and weighs less than 30 lbs. It's the perfect portable amp for me.
 

timbgtr

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I've wanted to be in this club for so long and now I finally qualify to be a member! I received my Aviator Cub yesterday from Sweetwater. I also got a passive switcher from Amazon to allow me to use any combination of the three preamps. This is easily the best (for me) sounding and feeling guitar amplifier I've ever had the pleasure to play through. It's incredibly versatile and the line-out is excellent for recording.
Anyway, I'm glad to be here!
View attachment 951591 View attachment 951592

Very happy Aviator Cub owner here; happy to join the club. My lifelong amp search is likely over; the only other amp I envision at this point would be a second QAC as a backup.

And thanks for the pix. My settings are pretty much the same as yours, maybe a little more on the limiter and a little less on the reverb.
 

Happy Enchilada

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If I ever get another amp (doubtful due to my age and less playing out these days, but ...), I'd go for a Tone Block 202 and a 1x12 or 2x10 cabinet. And since a majority of venues have players go direct into the PA and most churches run "silent stages," The 202 by itself would probably suffice with maybe a small pedal board. Plus there are so many "mini amps" these days for around $200, I could find a few I like and use them with the cab.

However, my Aviator Cub does it all and doesn't break my olde back. It goes direct to the PA with a separate volume control for that vs. the "speaker" volume, so I can use it as a monitor. I still use a stompbox for OD, but I would do that with ANY amp, even a $1000 Princeton Reverb RI. So I'll stick with the Cub, thanks.
 

Jakeboy

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I am in with a Superblock UK. I had and returned a Superblock US that I just hated…,the UK is a keeper.
 

jays0n

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I seem to have not joined this club. I have been using a 101 Mini since around when they car out I guess.
I recently did a comparison of different tubes in my Champ and threw in the 101 at the end. In the room it pretty much sounded the same as the champ, but on the recording it came out a little different. Really good still and some who have seen that comparison liked the Quilter best. I’ll post it if I figure out a good way to host that video/recording.

Anyway, I dig mine:
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ChicknPickn

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After my Vox Night Train 15 blew up, I swore off of tubes. For a while.

I bought the Quilter 101 Mini Reverb sight unseen. This was maybe two months ago. The opposite of buyer’s remorse, I’m more pleased with this black box with every day I play through it.

Sweet cleans, highly controllable breakup. My reverb and delay pedals are in the loop. But usually, the onboard reverb suits me fine.

It may be a long time before the Vox is repaired.
 

JDB2

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I posted about my Quilter "stack" rig in another thread recently, but thought it should also go into "the club."

Not long ago I bought a used Tone Block 202 and immediately loved it. It sounded great though my 2x12 Vintage 30 cab but I was also curious about Quilter's cabinets. So I tried a used Block Dock 12HD and was very impressed. In comparison to the V30s I actually prefer the sound of the 300 watt Celestion BN12-300S neo speaker. It has a rich midrange, very full bass, with lots of detail and presence. And the cabinet weighs only about 20 lb! Not bad for a speaker that Celestion designates as a bass speaker.

I was curious what two BDHDs could do so I found another used one. The "stack" sounds great! The cabs can be physically configured however I want and the head can be “docked” inside one of them. And of course I can run just one cab with full wattage if needed.

The rig works for me from very low volume all the way to thunderously loud. At higher volumes I'm reminded of the big, full, clear tone I got from my 130 watt Music Man back in the 1980s. A couple of choice overdrive pedals fill in the dirt.

The speakers don't only sound good to me with the Quilter by the way. I tried them with my Fender Prosonic 2x6L6 amp head and was very pleased.

Here's the pic:
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Tony474

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I'm pretty happy with my Aviator Cub, but I'm wondering whether anyone has tried a different speaker in it from the standard Eminence one. I feel I could do with extended lows and highs and perhaps a bit less midrange. The EQ controls are excellent but I can't help feeling there's more inside the amp than what I'm hearing.

Also a neodymium-magnet speaker such as for example the Celestion Creamback Neo might cut the already minimal weight still further. Thoughts and/or experience?
 

PhredE

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I'm pretty happy with my Aviator Cub, but I'm wondering whether anyone has tried a different speaker in it from the standard Eminence one. I feel I could do with extended lows and highs and perhaps a bit less midrange. The EQ controls are excellent but I can't help feeling there's more inside the amp than what I'm hearing.

Also a neodymium-magnet speaker such as for example the Celestion Creamback Neo might cut the already minimal weight still further. Thoughts and/or experience?

Just a couple random thoughts in response..

Manual link (great info there, if you haven't had a chance to scan through in detail):

The EQ is active, unlike almost all Fender amps -- it's a very different animal. Quilter goes to significant trouble to outline and describe the EQ curves associated with each voicing (see pages 16-19 of the manual). It's been my experience that the speaker is a fairly common weak point in many production amps. Just guessing, based on absolutely no first-hand info, that the speaker has a relatively 'flat' response to accommodate the varying EQ profiles of the voicings. Changing the speaker out to a more (quasi-Fender 'scooped' profile) might make or more of the voicings sound a tad better, but you might be sacrificing the quality of another. It's always a bit of a crap shoot.

Edit: I don't think I see a speaker out jack on it. If it had one, you could test with another speaker. Even on a more basic practical level, the speaker is only rated for 50W -- that might be reason alone to upgrade it.
 
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regularslinky

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I recently got an Aviator Mach 3. It's amazing. Easily keeps up with a very loud drummer. I use the Top Boost voice in channel 1 for cleans and the Plexi in channel 2 for dirt. I use the internal "Dist Boost" to dirty each of them up a bit, giving me 4 levels of gain. I put my clean boost in the effects loop and control that, channel selection, and "Dist Boost" from the footswitch - all of which cut my pedalboard almost in half. I honestly can't imagine a more versatile, better designed amp, and it sounds great.
 

Tony474

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Just a couple random thoughts in response..

Manual link (great info there, if you haven't had a chance to scan through in detail):

The EQ is active, unlike almost all Fender amps -- it's a very different animal. Quilter goes to significant trouble to outline and describe the EQ curves associated with each voicing (see pages 16-19 of the manual). It's been my experience that the speaker is a fairly common weak point in many production amps. Just guessing, based on absolutely no first-hand info, that the speaker has a relatively 'flat' response to accommodate the varying EQ profiles of the voicings. Changing the speaker out to a more (quasi-Fender 'scooped' profile) might make or more of the voicings sound a tad better, but you might be sacrificing the quality of another. It's always a bit of a crap shoot.

Edit: I don't think I see a speaker out jack on it. If it had one, you could test with another speaker. Even on a more basic practical level, the speaker is only rated for 50W -- that might be reason alone to upgrade it.
Thanks for the reply, and I appreciate the points made. I am fully aware of the active EQ and all that it involves, and I get the point about the speaker. I too find it unusual that it’s only rated at 50 watts, but that’s seemingly a conscious choice by the manufacturers for their own reasons.

But it would be nice to know if a speaker change would make a positive difference to suit my ears and tastes. Sure, there isn’t an extension socket, but there are ways, without risking the circuitry, to disconnect the internal speaker and connect the amp to the one in another of my amps.

I emphasise that I’m happy enough with the Cub as it is, but merely curious, that’s all.
 

davidchagrin

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Thanks for the reply, and I appreciate the points made. I am fully aware of the active EQ and all that it involves, and I get the point about the speaker. I too find it unusual that it’s only rated at 50 watts, but that’s seemingly a conscious choice by the manufacturers for their own reasons.

But it would be nice to know if a speaker change would make a positive difference to suit my ears and tastes. Sure, there isn’t an extension socket, but there are ways, without risking the circuitry, to disconnect the internal speaker and connect the amp to the one in another of my amps.

I emphasise that I’m happy enough with the Cub as it is, but merely curious, that’s all.
In the Quilter group on Facebook, some folks have mentioned replacing their Cub speakers with some success. I can't recall which speakers, but that would be subjective anyway. Eminence Texas Heat may have been mentioned more than once.
 




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