Quick and dirty "toothpicks"

Discussion in 'The DIY Tool Shed' started by screefer, Dec 6, 2019.

  1. screefer

    screefer Tele-Meister

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    I got a Mini Strat for my Granddaughter and had to refasten the bridge as it was loose and one of the holes was misaligned and stripped. A regular toothpick was too small to fill so I recalled how the old timers made tree nails (trunnels), and thought I might replicate that method.

    First I removed a bench stop. Then drilled a slightly over sized hole in a scrap of 3/8" plywood. I then whittled a piece of straight grained Doug Fir so it would start in the 6-32 nut that was the right size for the hole. Placed that over the bench stop hole and pounded it until I had enough. worked great!

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  2. ale.istotle

    ale.istotle Tele-Meister Silver Supporter

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    That's a cool method. I used a lazier method to do something similar. I chucked the whittled work piece in a drill and thinned it with sandpaper as it turned.

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  3. vid1900

    vid1900 Tele-Meister

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    I'm even lazier still.

    I use a wooden BBQ skewer. A pack will have variation, so there will be some #6 and #8 sized skewers.


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  4. ale.istotle

    ale.istotle Tele-Meister Silver Supporter

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    That's a good shortcut. Also, it's nice to know shrimp take the same gauge as a bridge plate.
     
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  5. Peegoo

    Peegoo Tele-Holic

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    Bamboo skewers are great for this stuff.

    If you use wooden-handled cotton swabs for your hobbies (art, gun cleaning, etc.), clip off the swab end when done and save the handle.

    Another great option for larger holes (bridge mounting, door hinges, etc.), is a wooden golf tee. Usually made of beech or maple, and they are already pointy!

    Need half-inch dowels? When you're done with a foam paint brush, break off the foam end and save the handle.

    Wooden dowels are everywhere. You just gotta see 'em :)
     
  6. nojazzhere

    nojazzhere Poster Extraordinaire

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    These are all good suggestions, but I often use two, three, or however many needed toothpicks to fill a hole. Put glue on one, insert almost all the way, break it off, then insert another. Let dry, then put in screw. May not be pretty, but it works.
     
  7. RoarDog

    RoarDog Tele-Meister

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    In my cabinet making days I would shave a tapered shank dip it in glue lightly tap it in cut it flush. Lightly sand, then use paint pens made by 3M to make an near invisible patch to even a discerning eye.
     
  8. jimilee

    jimilee Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

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    I have used chopsticks once or twice.


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  9. ale.istotle

    ale.istotle Tele-Meister Silver Supporter

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    These are all good ideas. The thing that's nice about @screefer 's trunnels is you can match the wood if it's going to show.
     
  10. Allan Allan

    Allan Allan Tele-Meister

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    I've got you all beat, for stripped pickguard holes I roll up paper and put it in with no glue at all.
     
  11. screefer

    screefer Tele-Meister

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    Great ideas here! I like the bbq skewers but I'm aways from town. The "trunnels" take less time to make than to explain how.
    Plus, the scored edges, due to the threads on the nut, allow the air/glue to exhaust...lol!
     
  12. trxx

    trxx Tele-Holic

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    A utility knife, pocket knife, whatever you have, can be used to quickly split off a suitable sized piece of wood from scrap for tightening up a hole. Make it longer than you need initially for holding in a vice. Shape if with a knife, file, sandpaper, whatever you have and cut off the excess. I used to keep tooth picks around, but cutting a piece of wood that is closer to the size that I need is more useful.

    By the way, a couple of inexpensive bar clamps from Harbor Freight and a couple of cutoffs of 2x4 or whatever can make for a very decent makeshift vise. I started out doing that and then ended up making a fixed vise on my shed bench using the same. I have a metal vise, but for most things my makeshift vise works better, is much longer, wider, and much more flexible. I think it is around 30" long, can open up to a little under 24" for holding wide things, and is just so much more useful than a metal vise (and much more inexpensive).
     
  13. Davecam48

    Davecam48 Friend of Leo's Ad Free Member

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    If you need to make doweling of a particular size, a method I use is to cut a length, square it to slightly bigger than the required diameter, mount it into an electric drill and taper the end against the disk sander or some sandpaper hand held.

    Then I take the required size die from my metal tap and die threading kit and mount into the vice.

    Run the drill around mid speed and push the pointy end into the die and just feed it in as it grinds off anything that isn't round or the right size. Usually comes out like a "bought one."

    And of course if you made it too big or small it is your own fault for not picking the correct size die in the first place:p

    DC
     
    Last edited: Dec 20, 2019
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