Questions about my Tele Necks

Discussion in 'Tele Home Depot' started by RYAN1987M, Mar 15, 2020.

  1. RYAN1987M

    RYAN1987M Tele-Meister Ad Free Member

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    Hi All,

    First off, I apologize if I'm posting this in the wrong forum. I've been a TDPRI member for awhile but haven't (yet) spent much time in the DIY Channel.

    I just have some questions about some of my maple necks...

    Question 1 / Guitar 1 - What are those spots/markings/lines that look almost pixel-like? I don't mind them, this isn't a gripe...but I've always been curious. I thought perhaps this would be something that anyone who has experience working with wood could easily explain. To me, the pattern almost looks like a piece of paper that got stuck in a printer and was then pulled out (you know how the ink gets stretched?) (sorry, a very odd comparison, I know, haha).

    Guitar 1 - Fender Road Worn '50s Telecaster – Limited Edition (2018). Neck Finish: Oiled Road Worn.

    [​IMG]

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    Question 2 / Guitar 2 - Is this dark brown line a split under the finish? Or just some unique character / discoloration with the wood itself? I can't feel anything at all with my fingers...so it must be under the finish.

    Guitar 2 - Fender American Vintage Hot Rod '52 Telecaster (2007). Neck Finish: Gloss Nitrocellulose Lacquer Front with Satin Nitrocellulose Lacquer Back.

    [​IMG]

    Again, not worried about any of this...simply curious. Thanks in advance for sharing your wisdom!
     
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  2. demon

    demon Tele-Meister

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    The spots/lines/markings that look stretched-out in places - that's the wood grain, and it's what you see when you cut through that grain at a range of angles like you get where the guitar neck shape merges into the heel. It's the same grain, just cutting through it at shallow angle gives longer "streaks" as you'd have to go further in dimension X to move over to the next layer of grain in dimension Y.

    The guys on here who know about wood can explain that better than me, but the tl;dr is "grain".
     
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  3. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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  4. Treadplatedual

    Treadplatedual Tele-Holic

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    Yep! Medullary rays, and those necks are beautiful!
     
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  5. jvin248

    jvin248 Poster Extraordinaire

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    .

    If you have a 'quarter sawn' neck you'd have those patterns on the top/back not the sides. Flat or rift sawn boards get them on the side(s). There is a debate about which sawing method creates the most stable neck and which creates the 'moast toanz' but I'll let you do the argument research :)

    .
     
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  6. Dacious

    Dacious Poster Extraordinaire

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    The brown line is simply the edge of a xylem vein, the vein that carries sap from the leaves to the other parts of the tree, these veins run down just inside the bark as a ring around the outside. It means this neck was cut from a piece close to the outside of the trunk. It has no implications for strength and isn't a flaw.

    The figuring you have on your necks is regarded as desirable - Fender saves the most figured wood with for instance birdseye, where little twigs were growing out - for the most expensive guitars and plainer wood for lesser instruments. Tiger stripe maple like the top two pics is desirable too. Gibson uses it in some Les Paul tops under stained finishes.
     
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  7. RYAN1987M

    RYAN1987M Tele-Meister Ad Free Member

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    Wow, within 40 minutes of my original post, and I've already learned so much!

    Thanks all, I really appreciate it. Truly, I find it pretty fascinating and I look forward to reading and learning more (thanks too for those links that were shared).
     
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  8. Jim_in_PA

    Jim_in_PA Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

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    Quarter sawn is not only beautiful, but it's often "more stable"...so it's a plus for both visual appeal and for things staying straight and true over time. It's one of the only ways to actually use sycamore reliably, for example. Different species have variations in visual appearance when quarter sawn; sometimes it's very striking. If you've ever seen traditional Stickley Arts and Crafts/Craftsman furniture, the QS white oak has a very unique and signature look. Maple and Cherry have similar attributes when quarter sawn. A related method for cutting up timber is called rift sawn, which de-emphasizes the rays that have been mentioned, but provides beautiful and simple very straight grain.
     
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  9. Fretting out

    Fretting out Friend of Leo's

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    I’ve heard it also called “Ray fleck”
     
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  10. MickM

    MickM Friend of Leo's Platinum Supporter

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    They are like fingerprints.
     
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