Questions About Automotive Finish

cwood3

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Hi,

First, I have never sprayed any guitar with anything other than nitro lacquer. Now I have a Strat project in which the end product is going to be Seafoam Green (think '57 Chevy). I have some PPG Deltron DBC2000 basecoat in the proper color and some PPG Deltron DC3000 High-Velocity Clearcoat, along with the appropriate reducer and hardener. These are urethane based products. So this is a science project for me, but I'm wanting to try it out to see how it works. I'm good with mix ratios and spray gun application. I'm just soliciting opinions on surface prep seeing how Deltron wasn't really designed with wooden guitars in mind. I'm all sanded to 220-grit on an alder body. All looks good. I'm wondering if I should seal coat with something or just apply a few thinned basecoats as sealer. I have plenty of the basecoat and reducer so no problem there.

Anybody do similar with automotive paint products???

Thanks,

Curtis
 

Mike Simpson

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Primer the body and sand it smooth just like you would for a car finish.
Make sure your final clear coats are thick enough to level sand and polish without going through layers or you may get witness lines.
 

Vizcaster

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I would make sure you have a compatible primer/sealer before you start to build color. The primer will absorb unevenly in the wood because that's what wood does. Once that's on there and sanded back smooth, you've got a consistent base to build the color and it will be more even. The way i look at it, all paint is translucent and never quite opaque, so it helps to have a consistent thickness of color. Besides, a primer or sanding sealer will be easier to sand back if the grain gets a little fuzzy from the first coat.
 

Mike Simpson

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I used clear automotive catalized poly on a guitar and it came out great.

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cwood3

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Thanks all. I'm kind of leaning towards just using the typical sanding sealer that you might find at the big box stores and spray/sand....etc...etc....until I have what I perceive to be a completely sealed/filled surface. Leave it with a 400/600 scuff and on with the base coats. The alder body is a very even color, no outstanding differences in color due to grain.

Thanks again........I'll be back
 

supersonicobr

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Just make sure whatever bottom coat you use is compatible with your base coats - try to get info from a paint shop on what that would be as there are commercially available wood appropriate PU undercoats you can throw your finish over. If the big box sanding sealer is some type of acrylic or nitro lacquer you might have it crack under the PU basecoat as the latter is quite "hot".
 

Mike Simpson

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I didn't ask... I just did it. I did not have any adhesion problems with the clear directly on alder and maple. I did spray adhesion promoter on the binding.
 

Rano Bass

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I use a lot of automotive products to paint guitars and basses. For that color I would use a white primer, it can be shellac based, lacquer based, or urethane based they all work fine.
 

Buckocaster51

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Some of us use the two-part polyurethane (aka top coat) as a wood sealer/primer.

As others have said, it is IMPORTANT to make sure that your chemistries are compatible.

:)
 




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