Question about re-sawing w/o bandsaw...

Discussion in 'Tele Home Depot' started by mjr428, Apr 29, 2019.

  1. mjr428

    mjr428 Tele-Meister

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    I picked up some bolivian rosewood today and now I have to figure out the best way to resaw it for fret boards without a bandsaw. I have a table saw but I'm a little sketched out about using it for this purpose. But may be willing to do so... Here's some pics.
    Any suggestions would be much appreciated, thanks[​IMG][​IMG]

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  2. RickyRicardo

    RickyRicardo Friend of Leo's

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    I think a table saw would waste too much. It's usually about an eighth and you wouldn't want to waste a a beautiful piece like that. I would find a shop with a bandsaw and tell them you build guitars. How thick is it?
     
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  3. mjr428

    mjr428 Tele-Meister

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    It's about an inch thick. About 5" wide and maybe 3 and a half feet long

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  4. Mike Simpson

    Mike Simpson Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

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    What a great excuse to buy a 14" bandsaw...
     
  5. otterhound

    otterhound Poster Extraordinaire

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    Send it to me with specific details and I will resaw it for you .
     
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  6. epizootics

    epizootics Tele-Meister

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    In the defense of resawing with a table saw, it can make your life easier than using a bandsaw sometimes, especially with real hard pieces of wood. You can end up snapping a whole bunch of band saw blades before you get the right combination of blade material/tension/etc. It is more wasteful though, as pointed above.

    The way I've done it in the past was simply to raise the blade progressively, starting relatively shallow and making sure the fence was placed correctly on scrap pieces first. Unless you want to resaw the whole thing at once, it might be a good idea to cut your pieces to width first so you don't have to raise the blade too much. Remember this can be a dangerous operation as you have to remove the blade guard & riving knife to make your cut. Use adapted push sticks and keep clear of the path in case of kickback.

    On larger pieces I would raise the blade, take a pass, then flip the piece along its thickness to take out a bit of wood on both sides. Toward the end of the process I would leave about 1/8" in the middle and finish it with a hand saw. You really don't want the two pieces separating and getting caught by the blade.

    I realize it makes me pretty uncomfortable describing this operation on a forum, MAKE SURE YOU ARE EXTRA CAREFUL and don't let any of your body part anywhere near the machine. Maybe I should add a picture of my thumb after its encounter with a table saw (during an apparently innocuous rip cut!)
     
  7. Texicaster

    Texicaster Tele-Holic

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    Have you squared it up yet?

    If just fret boards I'd rip to a 1/2" wider and longer than needed and then resaw.

    I'd be tempted to get a thinner table saw blade and just cut to leave a 1/2 inch or so in between then finish up with a good hand saw as suggested above.

    I'll assume you have a planer...

    Tex
     
  8. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Silver Supporter

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    Resawing on the table saw isn't too bad. I did it with some walnut for my last few acoustics. If the board is long, wide, and heavy, I found it easier to have a second pair of hands to pull it through. Figure you will lose 1/8" of wood per kerf, but you'll lose nearly that with a bandsaw and further planing /sanding unless it is really tuned up well.

    A big mistake I usually make is trying to squeeze out one more board than I really should. I'd go for 1/2" thick boards, let them warp, then joint /plane them down further after they settle down. Resawn on a bandsaw, and quartersawn fretboards usually are purchased rough at about 8 to 10 mm, at least the ones I've purchased are.

    As mentioned a few times up above, the resawing on edge as much as you can, and finish up with a bandsaw or handsaw, is the way to do it.
     
    Last edited: Apr 30, 2019
  9. brandonh

    brandonh Tele-Meister

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    You could always do it the "old" way with a handsaw. I cut my blank down to size, squared it up, and marked a centerline where I wanted the kerf. Then I re-sawed on that line with a Japanese saw. I've done bigger blanks this way with a Diston rip saw, but the kerf is bigger. I cheated a little and used a small gents saw to get the cut started, then came back in with the pull saw.

    Edited to add: I've used Bolivian Rosewood once. It was under a lot of tension and developed a bow after I re-sawed, so you may want to factor that into your equation somewhere, too.

    3-09.jpg
     
    Last edited: Apr 30, 2019
  10. mjr428

    mjr428 Tele-Meister

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    Thanks y'all for your responses! How thick should I make each slab then if I want to end up at 1/4" thickness? Around 3/8"?
     
  11. jondanger

    jondanger Poster Extraordinaire

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    I would probably take Otterhound up on his offer, but let me second the advice to be SO careful if you do decide to resaw on a table saw.

    I resawed some rosewood for a non guitar related project recently, and nipped about 1/16 - 1/8” into the end of my thumb and thumbnail. Scared the hell out of me and made me rethink my process. The main issue is that you need to use a push block to feed AND figure out how to apply both downward pressure to keep the board on the deck, and lateral pressure against the fence. It’s worth making a dedicated push block that hits all those points.
     
  12. crisscrosscrash

    crisscrosscrash Tele-Meister

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    I resawed once with the table saw and honestly probably wouldn’t again — it was sketchy. Tippy and hard to keep square to the fence.

    I was resawing a 1x7 board, one edge then the other. If I were to do it again I would probably sandwich it between two squared up boards to give more width to ride the table with greater stability.
     
  13. John Nicholas

    John Nicholas Friend of Leo's

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    Personally, I would take Otterhound up on his very generous offer. He has years of experience, knows how to "read" wood and will do a great job.

    For the cost of shipping the board two ways, it's a no brainer as far as I am concerned.

    Truly, resawing using a table saw, unless you have years of experience could be a recipe for disaster. I only use my table saw for rough cuts on lumber and use the utmost care and respect around that tool. I have seen (and heard) far too many horror stories, even on this forum, to bother cutting something that small and precise on a table saw.

    Truly, there are too many variables and danger to take that chance.

    Here's another way to look at it, risk assessment, is it worth getting hurt or worse loosing a finger to save a few dollars? I know it sounds dramatic and horrible, but like I said it's not worth a few dollars in my opinion.
     
  14. RickyRicardo

    RickyRicardo Friend of Leo's

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    If you are going to do it you'll only be doing one cut so go down the middle. You don't have enough material to do 2 cuts and account for jointing/planing/sanding. So 3/8" it is.
     
  15. mjr428

    mjr428 Tele-Meister

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    Thanks, I appreciate your generosity! I may take you up on your offer, but I do also want to learn how to do this stuff on my own (but I'd also like to keep my digits).
     
  16. ale.istotle

    ale.istotle Tele-Meister

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    You need to plan this a bit to do it safely. The posters who had their fingers near the blade took too much risk. You want to make yourself a zero clearance table saw insert with a splitter (to keep work piece from coming back together. https://www.woodmagazine.com/woodworking-tips/techniques/skills/safe-tablesaw-resawing
    The link shows a custom pusher, but I'd probably make a plywood or mdf 'sled' to attach the board which will ride along the fence or in the miter guide. Something like this would work (found via web search). You would have the vertical part forward so your work piece would align with the saw blade and i'd also have a thin block on the face to push the work. Works kind of like a one-pass deli slicer.
    You may also want a thin-kerf blade. Be safe.

    [​IMG]
     
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  17. Texicaster

    Texicaster Tele-Holic

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    If using tablesaw at all You absolutely have to set up some sort of jigs and feather boards.

    I'd zip over to Fine Woodworking forums and get their input. I haven't hung out there is quite some time but it was loaded with great advice and my go-to resource when coming up on issues like yours.

    Good luck!

    Tex
     
  18. jvin248

    jvin248 Poster Extraordinaire

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    Table saw with several featherboards would be a good idea. I made a couple out of 2x6 cut offs twenty years ago and when confronted with a sketchy board to cut I clamp them down on the table. You could stack them two high to get a fretboard width and keep enough pressure against the fence for the stock to avoid tipping. If you haven't used them before, you only want light pressure. Don't try to get them so tight you need to hammer your stock through the saw. You can also use one on the top to push down the stock by clamping to the fence.

    Thin kerf blades would be good. Zero gap plate. triple check blade to table squareness.

    Do two passes keeping the same board face against the fence to 'score' both sides then any extra web left over take out with a hand saw. I might say to purposefully leave a web to keep the board in control rather than cut it free with the second cut at the blade's highest reach.

    A band saw will create more wave and what you keep from a smaller kerf you'll waste with unevenness of cut, especially if the blade wanders on it's own.

    [​IMG]
     
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  19. Ripthorn

    Ripthorn Tele-Afflicted

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    I've resawed on the table saw a ton. Make sure you have a nice square fence to ride against and push blocks. Set up the blade height to just over half the width of the board and very square. Make sure the board is jointed on both sides nice and square. Then you run it through twice, keeping the same face against the fence each time, flipping so that it just completes the cut on the second run. USE PUSHBLOCKS! I have found that I can get less waste doing this than just using a hand saw. I now have a big enough bandsaw to resaw whatever, but I have resawn a 13" wide slab of walnut this way, completing the cut with a Disston rip saw.

    Oh, also make sure you have some sort of splitter on the outfeed side of the blade just in case the internal stresses cause it to pinch the blade, which can happen easily with exotics. A riving knife is ideal, but I just use a nail the same width as my saw blade in my shop made zero clearance insert.
     
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  20. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Silver Supporter

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