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Question about Drill Press Spindle Sanders

Discussion in 'The DIY Tool Shed' started by Jmwright777, Dec 2, 2019.

  1. Jmwright777

    Jmwright777 TDPRI Member

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    So I bought a set of 2" long sanding drums for use with a drill of drill press and I want to use them as a splindle sander in my drill press. My question is what speed do you guys normally run them at? I have the 8in benchtop drill press from HF and I have the belt set at the second to highest point on the pulleys. It gets some serious vibration it I push the piece into it to hard. Is it just a finesse thing where I have to do a lot of light passes or just lower/raise the rpms? Thanks in advance.
     
  2. Preacher

    Preacher Friend of Leo's

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    Be really careful pushing too hard against the spindle. Drill presses are made for vertical forces only not horizontal pressure. You can bend your drill press and end up with a wobbly spindle. Don't ask how I know.

    As far as the RPMS, I would run it pretty high so I could do more light passes.
     
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  3. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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    I think you'll be disappointed in how sanding drums operate in the long run and I can see the chuck falling out of a 8" DP. They just aren't that heavy duty. The drums load up and are more frustration than anything. You should investigate an OSS.

    https://www.homedepot.com/p/RIDGID-...Vh4bACh3OGgfKEAQYASABEgLRPvD_BwE&gclsrc=aw.ds

    https://www.rockler.com/triton-osci...MIpc_318aX5gIVh4bACh3OGgfKEAQYBSABEgLugPD_BwE

    https://www.homedepot.com/p/WEN-Osc...Vh4bACh3OGgfKEAQYAyABEgIT2vD_BwE&gclsrc=aw.ds

    https://www.harborfreight.com/14-in...MIpIHVqseX5gIVxBx9Ch3oKw7yEAQYAiABEgLuo_D_BwE
     
  4. boris bubbanov

    boris bubbanov Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

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    I've done a lot of hours with a spindle sander on an old Shop Smith portable does everything rig. But I think the bearings in it are engineered for multiple purposes and maybe typical drill presses are not.

    I'll tell you what worked on the Shop Smith. Fairly low rpm, fresh sanding sleeves, and let the cutting action of the paper do the work. Take your time, multiple passes.

    JM, what species of wood are you working with? I did a lot of spruce, balsa, pine, poplar. Some walnut and birch, but no rock hard woods really.
     
  5. Jmwright777

    Jmwright777 TDPRI Member

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    Thanks for the info. I know the drill press isn't meant for the job but I don't have the cash to drop for a OSS or ROSS at the moment. As for the woods right now I have only taken pine to it but I plan on some harder stuff in the future.
     
  6. Vizcaster

    Vizcaster Poster Extraordinaire

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    I would suggest as low a speed as your patience will tolerate.

    And some sort of dust collection, not only for obvious reasons but also to keep the drum clean and cool. I made a temporary drill press table surface using a piece of wood with a circle cut in it the size of the drum, and a shop vac car nozzle screwed to it next to where the drum rotates.

    Also a chunk of that gummy stuff like crepe soled bucks used to be made from is useful to keep the drum clean, particularly with pine resin.
     
  7. schmee

    schmee Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

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    Run highest speed. Side forces not great on the DP ... but it works.
     
  8. Gipper

    Gipper Tele-Meister

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    That Harbor Freight spindle sander is a good piece of equipment for the price. I built many guitar bodies using one. Just wait for a sale and a 20% of coupon and you can score one pretty reasonable.
     
  9. GunsOfBrixton

    GunsOfBrixton Tele-Afflicted

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    Don't do it. Buy a cheap corded variable speed drill and strap it to a bench / clamp it down somehow and use that instead. You won't cry when you wear it out.
     
  10. RodeoTex

    RodeoTex Doctor of Teleocity

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    I purpose-built a rotary drum sander sander and a machinist buddy told me that it was going to remove wood, but every little piece of grit was going to leave a line all the way around the body.
    He was right. That's what oscillating spindle Sanders do well.
     
  11. trxx

    trxx Tele-Afflicted

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    I'm turning to using lots of hand tools lately. Rasps, sanding sticks, and files can be surprisingly effective. Sanding sticks are a diy tool. You can make them any shape you want from scrap wood and dowels. You would also create profiles in wood blocks for rounding edges uniformly. ~40 grit emery paper epoxied to sanding sticks is good for rough shaping without hogging off too much at one time. Use a small and inexpensive nylon or brass brush for cleaning out the paper once in a while. A decent rasp can be used for faster and rougher shaping. A horse hoof rasp will hog off some wood pretty fast, but I don't know if they come in rounded shapes. Files can be useful for intermediary sanding and saving on emery paper. But emery paper epoxied to sanding sticks holds up surprisingly well, especially the rougher stuff.
     
  12. Garruchal

    Garruchal Tele-Meister

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    I only have one experience with this: an old Craftsman drillpress. Any sort of lateral force causes the chuck to come off sooner than later. I looked into it as well: it is not recommended to use a drillpress for anything other than drilling. I tried altering the speed as well; it didn't help.
     
  13. trev333

    trev333 Telefied Ad Free Member

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    you could use a drill press if the spindle drum has some sort of bottom pin going into a bearing in the work table to take most of the side force ....

    not ideal, but it was probably done before ROSS type sanders came along...
     
  14. jvin248

    jvin248 Poster Extraordinaire

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    .

    I tried it for a while and the frustration level of the chuck falling out onto the floor was too much. I searched Craigslist and found a well used ROSS/OSS for $50. That lasted several years until the top bearing (bushing) wore out and the thing would bind up. Tried finding replacements and they only sold complete motor kits that were about as much as a new ROSS/OSS. I went to a specialty bearing place and they didn't have anything to match either.

    I would recommend getting the belt sander and spindle combo. I use the oscillating belt a lot more than the spindles and the belt does not load up like the spindles.

    This WEN is the replacement I got.
    https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07MJ7X6D6/?tag=tdpri-20

    [​IMG]

    Oh, hang onto an old pair of tennis shoes -- the soles on some of them work great for unloading a sanding belt/spindle. Just like those gummy eraser bars.

    .
     
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  15. trev333

    trev333 Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Horns... that's where the ross/smaller spindles come into their own...:)

    you can sand the rest of a tele edge with a sanding block .... you have to anyway, to get the spindle sander marks out ..;)
     
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  16. Davecam48

    Davecam48 Friend of Leo's Ad Free Member

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    I bought a few of those gummy eraser bars for belt and spindle cleaning but the last one is just about all used up now and I have been using the common old white rubber pencil erasers which can be bought at the dollar shops (eight or ten in a blister pack for about one - two bucks) and I saw a video on U-tube or somewhere that a tube of silicon that's been opened and gone hard is also very good. Don't know what they're made of but the "real" ones are quite expensive.

    DC
     
  17. Davecam48

    Davecam48 Friend of Leo's Ad Free Member

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    I bought a few of those gummy eraser bars for belt and spindle cleaning but the last one is just about all used up now and I have been using the common old white rubber pencil erasers which can be bought at the dollar shops (eight or ten in a blister pack for about one - two bucks) and I saw a video on U-tube or somewhere that a tube of silicon that's been opened and gone hard is also very good. Don't know what they're made of but the "real" ones are quite expensive.

    DC
     
  18. Davecam48

    Davecam48 Friend of Leo's Ad Free Member

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    Whoops!!!!! Double post!!

    [​IMG]

    DC
     
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  19. old wrench

    old wrench Tele-Afflicted

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    Thanks for tip about the cured-out silicon, Dave!

    It seems like I always have one of those nearly full tubes that I opened for a small job, but when I go to use it again, find that it's hardened up solid despite plugging up the opening :).

    I'll give it a try!


    g
     
  20. Jmwright777

    Jmwright777 TDPRI Member

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    Thanks for all the suggestions. I am currently saving for a spindle sander like the one mentions above (the wen one) as well as browsing the used market. They just don't come up very often. I have also made the base for the DP table to sort of stabilize the spindle and I make sure to do double the normal passes barely pressing at all. All in all I will use it sparingly till I have a better solution. I still use sanding blocks, Shinto rasp, and files for the meat of the work and finish work.
     
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