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Power tool safety

Discussion in 'Tele Home Depot' started by Dpalms, Nov 4, 2020.

  1. Armo

    Armo Tele-Holic

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    It's healthy to be scared. Plan your job before you do anything and don't go running away with yourself. Use your PPE and with the router remember to only take off a little at a time.
     
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  2. teletimetx

    teletimetx Doctor of Teleocity

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    [QUOTE="Dpalms, post: 10212948, member: 147121"]I'm not sure if this is allowed here, if not please remove the thread.

    So I'm just getting into guitar building and wood working in general, I have a table saw and router so far. I'm having a blast building my guitar, but to be honest these 2 tools scare the $h*t outta me, I can only imagine the damage they can do to one's hands, arms, face, etc.

    So my question is what are some absolute must safety tools I should buy or make for these 2 tools.
    And other advice for any other wood working tools is more than welcome, as I'd like to keep all 10 fingers.
    Thanks.[/QUOTE]

    I don't think anyone is going to get banned for advocating safety. There's discussions here from time to time and IMO, it's always a welcome reminder. The tool user has the greatest responsibility to stay informed and actively pursue safe use, IMO.

    Seems like you might typically find more safety threads over in the DIY Tool Shed sub-forum, like these:

    https://www.tdpri.com/threads/safety-first-the-simplest-rule.963092/

    https://www.tdpri.com/threads/shop-safety-re-visited.563042/

    https://www.tdpri.com/threads/safety-equipment.527980/

    https://www.tdpri.com/threads/pattern-routing-practice-pattern-routing-safety.545034/

    https://www.tdpri.com/threads/lets-talk-safety-ladies-and-gentlemen.483915/

    I've seen more than a few YouTube vids on the subject as well. I've also seen a few honest disagreements as to best practices - but taking your time, thinking ahead and practicing on scrap so you can get a better feel for your tools seems to be highly recommended.
     
  3. schmee

    schmee Doctor of Teleocity

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    Lots of good advice above.
    For a router, a router table is a big improvement.
    For a table saw, always use a pusher stick in tight cuts.
    One thing that I had to learn, hold your workpiece FIRMLY! At first you have a tendency to holds things too loose as it SEEMS safer, but it's not.
     
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  4. Greggorios

    Greggorios Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

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    I'll defer to the suggestions by the experienced builders here but I'll add my 2 cents after having done a fair amount of safety training on a variety of tools in professional settings. You need to read and understand any and all written documentation provided by the manufacturer. Many are available online and in videos.

    Check with others (family, friends, people you work with) to find experienced users of the same kind of tools and if possible have them work with you until you gain some confidence.

    As mentioned already being scared is good because it means you understand that there's potential danger involved but it also means you're not confident of using them properly. Take the steps you need to gain that confidence. The quickest path is actual experience by getting someone who knows what they're doing to work with you. You'll get there, you've got the right attitude.

    Good luck and stay safe.
     
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  5. Marn99

    Marn99 Tele-Holic

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    Like others have said, it is healthy to be at the very least wary of your power tools. For things like the table saw and the router table, consider investing in a Grr-Ripper push block tool. I don't know if anyone's mentioned it yet, but never ever do climb cuts on a router table.
     
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  6. Freeman Keller

    Freeman Keller Poster Extraordinaire

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    Lots and lots of really good advice. I'll add one little thing. Before you touch a bit or a blade, to change or to adjust or for what every reason pull the plug out of the wall socket and put it in your pocket. If your power tool is permanently connected to its mains supply have a lockable disconnect switch, open the switch and lock it. That is an OSHA requirement for industrial safety, it should be part of your shop routine.
     
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  7. carpenter

    carpenter Tele-Holic Silver Supporter

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    Never get complacent the blade is always hungry !
    Set blade so it is coming through wood about an 1/8 to a 1/4 through top of board.
    Should anything go horribly wrong .
     
    Last edited: Nov 4, 2020
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  8. David Barnett

    David Barnett Doctor of Teleocity

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    That's the Law of Selective Gravitation, one of the corollaries of Murphy's Law: A dropped object will land in the one spot where it can do the most damage.
     
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  9. RogerC

    RogerC Poster Extraordinaire

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    That brake doesn't help with kickback, which I would say is as big a danger as cutting off digits. That's why knowledge of how to operate a saw properly is the best safety device.
     
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  10. RogerC

    RogerC Poster Extraordinaire

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    Having fear is fine if it wards you away from using something you're unsure of how to use as Greggorios said. Do NOT try to operate a machine you're fearful of. It will get you hurt.
     
    Last edited: Nov 4, 2020
  11. Yonatan

    Yonatan Tele-Meister

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    Not sure anyone mentioned it (not specific to power tools), keep first aid kit nearby.
     
  12. Nickfl

    Nickfl Friend of Leo's

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    Those gloves are meant to prevent slicing cuts from a kitchen knife, they would do nothing against a spinning, carbide tipped power tool blade. If you're worried about cutting yourself while changing blades they might be helpful but that's it.

    Definitely a useful tool for guitar building, but I don't know how much more safe it is. Have you ever seen a butcher use a bandsaw to cut up a side of beef? They cut though 1" rib bones like nothing...
     
  13. TwoBear

    TwoBear Tele-Meister

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    Oh one important thing I forgot to mention was I think I've talked about my friend Frank Puryear before. I had tons of fun growing up playing guitar with him and haven't seen him in many many years but two things stick out he wasn't playing guitar because he had cut through his tendon with a freshly sharpened file when he worked at world of strings, then later when he lived in Florida he had showed me one of his fingers that got stuck in a pipe bender and it looked like a withered carrot. The tools don't have to have speed to mess you up.
     
  14. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Most people don't use a bandsaw with all the blade exposed like a butcher shop would do. Blade guards are supposed to be 1/4" or so above the work thickness being cut.
     
  15. Peegoo

    Peegoo Poster Extraordinaire

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    And that's not just for safety. It's more of a blade guide than a guard; it keeps the blade from wandering in the cut.
     
  16. Frodebro

    Frodebro Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    Fear is a distraction, and if it's great enough it becomes dangerous because it dominates your thoughts.

    I personally always use a Grr-ripper, and I have Board Buddies on my table saw fence to keep the workpiece from lifting off the table. I also have an assortment of magnetic feather boards to keep the wood from drifting away from the fence. All of these safety devices were acquired immediately after a near miss with a nasty kickback that embedded the wood into the wall behind me. I was so focused on staying away from the blade that I wasn't thinking about anything else, and I allowed the workpiece to get sucked into the blade. Fortunately, I was positioned to the left of the blade and wasn't in the line of fire, but the lesson was quick and it stuck!
     
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  17. Jim_in_PA

    Jim_in_PA Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

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    I will add one additional suggestion beyond my original ist up above...in addition to having appropriate first aid supplies in your shop, always have your phone on your person. Use a holster or your pocket or whatever. Stuff happens and sometimes you can't manage it alone. Be in a position to call for help in those rare cases after you stop/inhibit bleeding enough to do so.
     
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  18. Freeman Keller

    Freeman Keller Poster Extraordinaire

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    One comment on my previous post where I said to always pull the plug before you change bits or blades, if you tie rap your spanners to the cord close to the plug you will automatically unplug it. And you'll never loose the wrenches.
     
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  19. dickey

    dickey Friend of Leo's

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  20. Davecam48

    Davecam48 Friend of Leo's Ad Free Member

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    What Marty said in #7 plus keep a plastic bag and a bicycle tyre tube handy as a torniquet:eek: "Only Jokin' "

    Seriously if you are scared of saw/router blades etc. build yourself a pin router table which will beef your safety factor by a huge percentage as far as routers go, and with circular saws ALWAYS use push sticks and home made jigs etc to push timber through a circular saw blade, and, don't try to force the wood through a blade if it doesn't want to go easily.........and don't try to force the timber through the blade!!!!!

    " Softly softly catch ye monkey!"

    DC
     
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