Power screwdriver?

Blue Bill

Poster Extraordinaire
Silver Supporter
Joined
Feb 15, 2014
Posts
9,688
Location
Maine
The small Ridgid ones that HD sells are great, I have 2. The bigger ones can overpower a guitar pickquard screw, the small ones are easier to control.
 

Ronkirn

Doctor of Teleocity
Vendor Member
Joined
May 1, 2003
Posts
12,874
Age
75
Location
Jacksonville, FL
Need I say more . . .;)


DSC_0151.JPG
 

Freeman Keller

Poster Extraordinaire
Joined
Aug 22, 2018
Posts
9,086
Age
77
Location
Washington
One tool that I have never seen a need for. I suppose if I was doing nothing but screwing together telecasters I would want one but the few screws in any guitar I can do by hand. I do predrill every hole with the correct bit for the screw and I do use the correct screwdriver (and good quality).

And while I used a cordless drill to drive self tapping screws in construction projects, the thought of a power screwdriver on little bitty guitar screws scares me. I would sure as heck want it to have a good clutch and properly adjust it.

Now I might put a speed winder on it for turning tuner knobs, but even that seems a bit unnecessary.
 

RCinMempho

Friend of Leo's
Joined
Jul 8, 2003
Posts
2,333
Location
Maryville, TN
I have a Ryobi, but the main thing is one that bends from straight to pistol grip. That little feature is super useful. You might want one with a light that shines where you are screwing.

Mine has a rechargeable battery. That's handy. I've never done enough screwing at one time to run out of power. My screwdriver battery has never run down either.
 

MyLittleEye

Tele-Meister
Joined
Dec 28, 2019
Posts
160
Age
55
Location
London UK
Another thumbs up for the that cheap little B&D. Great to have in the toolbox for household tasks. I regard integrated rechargeable devices as designed obsolescence; the battery is always first to fail. There'll always be AAs available.
 

Ronzo

Tele-Afflicted
Joined
Mar 10, 2016
Posts
1,930
Age
70
Location
South Florida, USA
One tool that I have never seen a need for. I suppose if I was doing nothing but screwing together telecasters I would want one but the few screws in any guitar I can do by hand. I do predrill every hole with the correct bit for the screw and I do use the correct screwdriver (and good quality).

And while I used a cordless drill to drive self tapping screws in construction projects, the thought of a power screwdriver on little bitty guitar screws scares me. I would sure as heck want it to have a good clutch and properly adjust it.

Now I might put a speed winder on it for turning tuner knobs, but even that seems a bit unnecessary.
Freeman, the level of high-quality work you do is another league altogether from my typical use of this tool. But for those of us who, like me, have had carpal tunnel surgery on both wrists, and have benign essential tremor as well, a tool like this that can minimize repetitive actions can be valuable. Not just for guitars, but for other household jobs, too.

For example: any job requiring low-torque turning of small pitch machine screws, such as those mounting an outlet into an electrical box. Or removing and re-seating sheet metal screws in small to medium appliances up to refrigerators. A small, lightweight tool with no tethered power and built-in illumination for difficult-to-see screw placement is quite valuable.

The general purpose uses of this tool, IMO, justify the purchase.
 

LaMarr-Bruister

TDPRI Member
Joined
Feb 27, 2022
Posts
43
Location
VA
One tool that I have never seen a need for. I suppose if I was doing nothing but screwing together telecasters I would want one but the few screws in any guitar I can do by hand. I do predrill every hole with the correct bit for the screw and I do use the correct screwdriver (and good quality).

And while I used a cordless drill to drive self tapping screws in construction projects, the thought of a power screwdriver on little bitty guitar screws scares me. I would sure as heck want it to have a good clutch and properly adjust it.

Now I might put a speed winder on it for turning tuner knobs, but even that seems a bit unnecessary.
I hope you never need it...but my body has reached a tough spot where there's a lot of everyday tasks that really leave me in pain and make doing the things I enjoy much harder.
 

oldunc

Friend of Leo's
Joined
Jan 31, 2014
Posts
2,201
Location
California
Arthritis in my wrist is making turning a bunch of screws a painful event. I’m sure final tightening of anything guitar related should be by hand, but is anyone using a power driver to remove screws and at least get them started? I want to clean up the wiring on a strat pickguard that I bought for my kiddo, but the thought of removing the pickguard and reinstalling is maddening.

Any recommendations for a model or are they all the same?
Those little Milwaukee (or Panasonic; same tool) screwdrivers are ideal for that sort of thing. They have a clutch and variable speed, all low, so will give you a consistent final tightness with no worries.
 

Freeman Keller

Poster Extraordinaire
Joined
Aug 22, 2018
Posts
9,086
Age
77
Location
Washington
Freeman, the level of high-quality work you do is another league altogether from my typical use of this tool. But for those of us who, like me, have had carpal tunnel surgery on both wrists, and have benign essential tremor as well, a tool like this that can minimize repetitive actions can be valuable. Not just for guitars, but for other household jobs, too.

For example: any job requiring low-torque turning of small pitch machine screws, such as those mounting an outlet into an electrical box. Or removing and re-seating sheet metal screws in small to medium appliances up to refrigerators. A small, lightweight tool with no tethered power and built-in illumination for difficult-to-see screw placement is quite valuable.

The general purpose uses of this tool, IMO, justify the purchase.

I hope you never need it...but my body has reached a tough spot where there's a lot of everyday tasks that really leave me in pain and make doing the things I enjoy much harder.
I understand totally. I'm 77 and fortunately do not have those issues (yet). Lots of other things hurt, but my hands still work pretty much as they always did.
 

Kev-wilson

Tele-Meister
Joined
Mar 22, 2022
Posts
101
Age
55
Location
England
Making sure you use the correct bit is useful as in Phillips & Pozidrive, and safer not to drive all the way in so nipping the screws up by hand at the end (unless you're 'first fixing' Timber with one of those lovely DeWalt impact drivers above :) ) would be my advice.
 

Ronkirn

Doctor of Teleocity
Vendor Member
Joined
May 1, 2003
Posts
12,874
Age
75
Location
Jacksonville, FL
Freeman, the level of high-quality work you do is another league altogether from my typical use of this tool.


Yeah Man.. I only wish I had the time to spend on something like Freemans.. If I were to do what I wanted, I'd be so far behind, I'd probably run into myself coming up behind from another time dimension..

I usually do several at a time... that's a lotta screwin'.. ;)
 

Peegoo

Doctor of Teleocity
Joined
Oct 11, 2019
Posts
12,924
Location
Beast of Bourbon
There'll always be AAs available.

You can save a briefcase full of Krugerrands on AA batteries by getting NiMH rechargeables. They're initially more expensive, but I bought two sets (each with charger and eight batteries) from Amazon about eight years ago and they are all still going strong.

NiMH does not have a 'memory' like old-school NiCD batteries do. They also don't self-discharge like nicads do.

Click HERE for the thing I got


..
 

eallen

Friend of Leo's
Gold Supporter
Joined
Jul 30, 2013
Posts
2,810
Location
Bargersville/Indianapolis, Indiana
There is obviously a big difference between a screw gun & screw driver. I use the typical 18v cordless drills & impacts nonstop but not so much on guitars. I went to a rechargeable Ryobi cordless screwdriver last year to save some wrist wear. It works well & has abundant power with 2 speeds & reverse.

Things I wished it did in hindsight. A rocker trigger for forward & reverse instead of a switch to slide. An adjustable clutch since it is hard to sense tightness in smaller screws. The Ryobi is little larger so it will handle some tourqe but I feel like slightly smaller would be more nimble.

Overall a great tool but wow, it is half the price I paid right now at Homedpot!

 




Top