Power for the machine

RollingBender

Tele-Afflicted
Vendor Member
Joined
May 14, 2011
Posts
1,659
Location
SW Minnesota
My old CNC vertical machining center was built for 3-phase power but ran just fine on 240 volt single phase.
70C1A2F8-273C-46C4-A124-FCEB7DA29A45.jpeg


I just found out last week that my new(er) machine cannot be wired up to single phase like the old one even though they came from the same manufacturer.
4F86C58E-130E-47FC-B2DB-AC2D2547809F.jpeg


…so…now I need to figure out how to make my own 3-phase power.
 

boxocrap

Tele-Afflicted
Joined
Aug 26, 2021
Posts
1,291
Location
north delta british columbia canada
My old CNC vertical machining center was built for 3-phase power but ran just fine on 240 volt single phase.
View attachment 943548

I just found out last week that my new(er) machine cannot be wired up to single phase like the old one even though they came from the same manufacturer.
View attachment 943549

…so…now I need to figure out how to make my own 3-phase power.
do they have a return policy?..looks like more than a few pennies for that one
 
Last edited:

Telekarster

Poster Extraordinaire
Gold Supporter
Joined
Aug 14, 2019
Posts
5,402
Location
Earth
Geesh! That's some serious equipment you got there man, in a hood no less! Wow! You must have great neighbors! LOL!!! ;)
 

guitar_paul1

Tele-Afflicted
Joined
May 29, 2003
Posts
1,046
Location
washington state / SoCal desert
Depends entirely on the motor drives.
Get the manufacturer tell you what converter to use.
Lots of $$ at stake. Rotary converter should work on anything. Switched capacitors may burn something, depending. There might be a modern solid state converter I don't know about. Been away from it for a number years.
 

Jim_in_PA

Friend of Leo's
Silver Supporter
Joined
May 31, 2019
Posts
3,172
Location
SE PA - Doylestown PA
Rotary is typically what folks use for larger needs here but VFDs are increasingly popular for single machine applications where they are compatible. You'll be happy with that rotary unit!
 

old wrench

Friend of Leo's
Joined
Feb 2, 2017
Posts
3,120
Location
corner of walk and don't walk
Lever and fulcrum is our friend.


Exactly :)

I've moved some huge pieces of equipment with nothing more than some pieces of pipe (all of the same diameter) for rollers and a sturdy lever.

A come-along comes in very handy as well.

edit: you can even sort of steer your load by positioning your rollers perpendicular to the path you want to travel - larger diameter rollers = easier rolling, but on flat concrete even small diameter pipe like 3/4" or even 1/2" will work OK.

The ancients employed rollers to some pretty impressive results ;)



You must have a really good-sized motor powering your mill!

That is one very large rotary converter - what is the H.P. rating on that thing?

.
 
Last edited:

RollingBender

Tele-Afflicted
Vendor Member
Joined
May 14, 2011
Posts
1,659
Location
SW Minnesota
The rotary motor is 40hp. My machine spindle motor has a max HP of 29 but I’ll never see that. The old machine had a 15hp 3-phase that was actually running on single phase so realistically running at 10-ish HP and I never saw the power meter go above 30%.

I made a set of skates out of plate steel, precision ground rod and a pile of roller bearings. Each skate has a platform 4” x 6”, has 2 axles, and 8 roller bearings as the wheels. By myself, I was able to spin this 10,000lb machine 180 degrees and push it into position. Actually, with the slight slope of the garage floor, it will start rolling down hill on its own when you let it down off the jack.
 




Top