Post EQ-ing a live recording - use subtractive approach?

Discussion in 'Recording In Progress' started by scout2112, Jun 17, 2019.

  1. scout2112

    scout2112 Tele-Holic

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    I recorded our band over the weekend at a live show with a condenser mic near the mixing board, and the audio quality wasn't as good as hoped. First off the sound guy had a pretty badly EQ'd mix. The audio has a very loud low and high end, and not enough mid. The guitars sit way too far back in the mix. I've played around with using a parametric EQ on it to try and level it out using a spectrum analyzer... I adding some varions boots and cuts, high and low pass filters. I got the levels looking pretty flat, and it's improved, but overall it still sounds pretty thin and hollow. What approach do you take for EQ-ing this type of recording? Tips?
     
  2. WireLine

    WireLine Tele-Afflicted

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    Without hearing it, hard to say...

    But 1st thing I’ve done is to highpass at 35hz (or so) to eliminate low end rumble...then cut or boost as needed. Might play around with the Q of each band, as sometimes a shallow but wide adjustment is all you need
     
  3. joealso

    joealso Tele-Holic Silver Supporter

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    I'm interested in this thread too. I've recorded some bands, with their permission, for my own enjoyment. I use Audacity (it's free) for editing. Lots of editing options, filters, tools, etc. The problem is that I just don't know what I'm doing, so it's all trial and error and that's very time consuming.

    My main issues with the rough recordings are the peaks and valleys and crowd noise. I've tried using compression to even out the peaks and valleys, but I haven't been successful.
     
  4. Martin R

    Martin R Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

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    Good luck...there's the old "garbage in/garbage out" saying.
    However, wouldn't call it success, but I've salvaged a few live recordings by making several different tracks. EQ one for the bass, one track for guitars, one for vocals, etc...concentrating each track on bringing out one specific instrument. Then play with volumes when you combine them.
     
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  5. Chud

    Chud Poster Extraordinaire

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    Assuming this is a mono recording? You could try Martin's suggestion above and make 3-4 copies of the track, and do very specific EQ slices for each. Pretty hard pass filters at each of the cut points with just a little bleed for glue. Maybe a little mild panning on each track to try and instill a bit of a stereo field.
     
  6. beyer160

    beyer160 Friend of Leo's

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    What DAW are you using? I'd try a multiband comp or a dynamic EQ to tame bloated frequency bands without gutting them altogether. Another neat trick to get a stereo feel to a mono track is to separate your track into three components- low end (below 100hz or so) and two identical tracks of everything above that cutoff point. Pan the bass center, delay one of the high end tracks 10-20ms (or whatever feels right) and pan them out until it has a little 3D feel, but not so much it sounds "processed". Or whatever feels right, there are no rules except one- always cut EQ, never boost. And even that isn't so much a "rule" as it is a "good idea".
     
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  7. woodman

    woodman Grand Wazoo @ The Woodshed Gold Supporter

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    Did you try an EQ sweep?
     
  8. Dennyf

    Dennyf Tele-Afflicted

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    Before you spend more time trying to fix it, listen to your favorite album and run it through an EQ set flat. Then go through each of the bands individually setting it to it's extremes and listen to how it affects the sound. This may help train your ear to hear what the deficiencies are in the recording you're trying to fix. After that, as you're working on the recording, occasionally a/b it with your favorite album, just to keep your ear from coming adrift of the target.

    The idea is not to make it sound exactly like your favorite album (nice, but likely impossible), but to avoid letting ear fatigue skew your result.

    Usually, cutting offending bands is better. Boosting usually ends up with you chasing your own tail, inadvertently turning your EQ into a volume booster/comb filter. But your description suggests that boosting the mids MIGHT be a solution. Just try to keep the locus of all bands at zero. If everything is above or below zero, you're not EQing, you're adjusting the volume.
     
  9. scout2112

    scout2112 Tele-Holic

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    I was using multitrackstudio for ipad, which has a multi-band parametric EQ. It's a mono recording. I'll try some of the suggestions listed above, but frankly it's probably not worth too much additional effort. Like what was mentioned above... garbage in - garbage out. We play out several times a month and I'm sure there'll be more/better opportunities to get a decent live recording. Sometimes the sound guy will let us tap USB straight into the board and get a multi-track recording.
     
  10. studio

    studio Poster Extraordinaire

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    Any way we can hear a portion of your recording?
     
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