Poplar and Oak

Discussion in 'Tele Home Depot' started by joewg3, Jun 4, 2019.

  1. joewg3

    joewg3 TDPRI Member

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  2. Deeve

    Deeve Friend of Leo's

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    Looks nice - glad you're gonna make more.
    Keep the camera nearby.
    Peace - Deeve
     
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  3. 8barlouie

    8barlouie Friend of Leo's

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    I’m curious about the sandwich concept. Is it purely aesthetic, or is there another reason?

    Oh, it looks very nice.
     
  4. Milspec

    Milspec Friend of Leo's

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    You do know that at some point you really do have to make an Oreo body....just because.
     
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  5. jvin248

    jvin248 Poster Extraordinaire

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    Answer depends if you believe in tone wood or not.

    Gibson did the 'pancake' bodies in the 70s. Various theories existed
    "moar sustain!" (by making it more rigid),
    "Less warping" (like plywood, but how many guitar bodies warp?),
    "cheaper to build!"(the wood might be cheaper but a whole lot of gluing and labor was involved).
    "design statement" (something new for the dealers to talk about, get customers in the store to try the latest and greatest models).

    There may have just been a supply issue, rapidly expanding guitar sales (Baby Boomers were working and earning money to spend on rock!), forced them to use whatever wood they could get, supply vendor changes perhaps.


    .
     
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  6. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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    The accepted theory repeated over and over is that Norlin was corporate owned, profit being the most important thing, and was full of bean counters. Supposedly, the wood sourced was cheaper and heavier. Quality suffered during those years. I've had 3 piece maple necks that twisted from that era, as well as poplar and alder bodied SG's. One mahogany Sg was a one piece body and curved down like a potato chip. They weren't all bad guitars and most people still couldn't afford them, but the 70's era wasn't noted for a lot of quality domestically made factory guitars or cars.
     
    Last edited: Jun 5, 2019
  7. joewg3

    joewg3 TDPRI Member

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    I did it for my first build because it was convenient. Poplar at Lowes is exactly 3/4" thick and the Oak is exactly 1/4". Using the 1/4" Poplar just wouldn't look as cool, but at the time I hadn't considered just staining the middle piece! I've done some normal builds since, but the "oreo" types get the most attention and are unique. After trying it back-to-back, the tone is a little different with a hardwood center. I honestly don't see a huge difference in "tone woods" unless it's something extreme. I did start putting an aluminum bar inside the guitars from the strings to neck. Now that makes a huge difference in tone, etc., but is a massive pain in the rear to build.
     
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  8. hemingway

    hemingway Poster Extraordinaire

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    I like a stripe
     
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  9. Milspec

    Milspec Friend of Leo's

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    Metal bar? I like what you were thinking there. There was an old folk instrument that I saw while in upper Norway years ago that was similar to a mandolin except it had an extra set of strings that ran beneath the bridge to the neck. The volume and complexity that came out of the sound hole was amazing. I never got a good look at the construction so I don't know if it was the same set of strings that were strung the full distance like that or seperate strings really, but it always intrigued me as to what it would be like in a dreadnaught or parlor guitar?
     
  10. joewg3

    joewg3 TDPRI Member

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    I got the idea from the "Backbone" product that attaches to the back of your guitar. I figure may as well build it into the guitar itself. The aluminum bar goes from the string holes and in the wood below the neck pocket so the screws go through it. At the string holes, the aluminum rests on a small piece of brass, steel, or aluminum, and rests against the aluminum bar. I drill out the ferrels so the strings go through both pieces of metal and rest on those.

    You can see the aluminum in this picture of a Texas guitar I was building. I don't do this on all builds anymore because it's a pain.

     
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  11. epizootics

    epizootics Tele-Meister

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    Sounds similar to what Wandre did on most of his guitars, 'cept of course he used aluminium for the necks too!

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]



    That metal bar runs the whole length of the body. It seems to modify the attack somehow, something like a soft metallic clicky sound. Anthony Paine of Harvester guitars uses the same process on his Antonio Series with great results.
     
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