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Podcasts to make you a better musician/guitarist?

Discussion in 'Tab, Tips, Theory and Technique' started by matrix, Jan 26, 2021.

  1. matrix

    matrix Tele-Meister

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    Has anyone got recommendations for podcasts that provide useful information to help one advance as a musician?

    Could be guitar specific, or theory oriented, maybe on music composition in general.

    I am looking for density of information.

    I am not interested in discussions of gear, nor do I have much tolerance for man-children killing time talking about how much beer they drank at the pub. Or how much they miss drinking beer at the pub (yeah, I am looking at you "The Guitar Hour").

    I would have thought an audio format would lend itself to useful musical analysis, but I keep on coming away from sampling podcasts thinking I have wasted my time.
     
  2. 421JAM

    421JAM Tele-Meister

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    GuitarMusicTheory.com
     
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  3. TheDavis

    TheDavis Tele-Meister

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    Try Broken Record if you’re looking for inspiration.
    Amazing musicians talking about their creative process.
     
  4. jrblue

    jrblue Friend of Leo's

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    Some may help you become a better player, or increase your knowledge, but none will make you a better musician.
     
  5. matrix

    matrix Tele-Meister

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    My quest to become a better musician involves increasing my ability and knowledge. Do you suggest a different pathway?
     
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  6. thunderbyrd

    thunderbyrd Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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    well, sorry, Jrblue, but...so exactly what would make one a better musician?
     
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  7. 421JAM

    421JAM Tele-Meister

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    Likewise, if you wish to be a writer, you should not bother improving your vocabulary or grammatical skills. Neither of those things will make you a better writer.
     
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  8. klasaine

    klasaine Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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    Don't listen to podcasts.
    Listen to music.
    Imitate, assimilate, innovate.

    If you are really compelled to listen to musicians talk about "the process", watch these.
    Caveat - he never actually mentions anything about what to play ...
     
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  9. Ed Driscoll

    Ed Driscoll Tele-Afflicted

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    On YouTube, I enjoy Rick Beato and Warren Huart's deconstructions of classic songs, and That Pedal Show, which has taught me a lot about effects and guitar playing. Just being able to hear the examples of different effects and in various orders is extremely helpful. Sound on Sound magazine and Creative Sound Lab have several interesting videos on production techniques. The Sweetwater videos, while obviously there to sell product, often have some interesting tips on getting the most from gear and recording.
     
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  10. matrix

    matrix Tele-Meister

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    So, this seems like such a odd thing for an educated musician to say. You have spent time reading books, taking classes on music, have you not? Do you feel that time would have been better spent listening to music?

    I listen to a lot of music. Music I like, music I dont like. I try to learn from all of it. I have a fair number of years of listening under my belt, and I plan to have more. But there comes a time - at least for me - to learn more directly, in a more didactic format.

    Did you learn all you know from just listening to music? The way you write about it in this forum, that does not seem likely.

    If I could go to university for music, I would. Lacking that, I read books, I watch Youtube videos, I work through Truefire courses, I take Udemy courses. Even some private classes with a Truefire instructor. All of which I believe have benefited me. And - it seemed to me - that I might be able to learn something from podcasts.

    Interestingly, some of the responses here make it seem that there are those who feel that trying to learn from podcasts is a fool's errand. Not the response I was expecting.
     
  11. matrix

    matrix Tele-Meister

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    @Ed Driscoll thanks for the Youtube suggestions. I have seen some great stuff on Rick Beato's show, and will check some of the others out.

    But I am really hoping to get a line on podcasts - I am starting to find Youtube annoying as a pure listening experience, between burning phone charge on a video I am not watching, and the ever-heavier presence of advertisements that require me to find my phone and hit "skip ad"
     
  12. Deeve

    Deeve Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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    Cory Wong's podcast - wongnotes

    He's smart, courteous, knowledgeable and easy to listen to.

    I find him @ premiereguitar.com

    Peace - Deeve
     
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  13. 421JAM

    421JAM Tele-Meister

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    if my post in response to jrblue came across in this manner I would like to point out that I was being sarcastic. I thought it was pretty obvious, and maybe you did too, but sometimes that doesn’t come across.

    It’s ludicrous to suggest you can’t improve as a musician through listening to podcasts. Sure, some podcasts are just gossip. But others contain heaps of useful knowledge that you can use to improve your skills as a musician.

    Being a musician is not sorcery or magic. It is an art form built on a wide array
    of skills. The more of these skills you develop, the better you’ll be as a musician, and the medium from which you learn these skills doesn’t make any difference.
     
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  14. teletail

    teletail Tele-Afflicted

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    The easiest, fastest way (not that it's actually easy or fast), is to find a really good teacher. With Skype and so many world class musicians out of work due to that which can't be mentioned, there's no excuse for not being able to find a good teacher. I've taken some lessons with Johnny Hiland and he's excellent.

    The problem with podcasts, videos and books is that they provide no feedback regarding what you are doing wrong or right.
     
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  15. Jeremy_Green

    Jeremy_Green Tele-Meister

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    Really enjoying Josh Smith’s live from the flat five interviews he has been doing on YouTube. Also guitarwank was always fun and a more traditional podcast.
     
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  16. 421JAM

    421JAM Tele-Meister

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    Live from Flat Five exists in podcast form, as well. I havent checked it out yet, but it is saved in my podcast library.
     
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  17. cnlbb

    cnlbb Tele-Afflicted

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    Song Exploder is usually interesting. It's musicians taking one of their songs and taking it apart piece by piece. Sometimes it's a discussion of recording it in the studio and others a reflection on how the lyrics and melody came together. It isn't going to teach you theory, scale, or how to be SRV, but it could help you become a more thoughtful musician.
     
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  18. telemaster03

    telemaster03 Tele-Meister

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    I'm not sure from the discussion exactly what it is you're looking for. Here's a few I've enjoyed, take 'em or leave 'em.

    YouTube - Homeskoolin' with Tom Bukavec - I know you said no YouTube but these are great.

    Truetone Lounge Podcast - Mirrors the YouTube video series, also his "Ask Zac" videos are excellent in providing insight to different players, their technique and contributions. Heavy Telecaster content.

    Fretboard Journal - Excellent and varied guitar content, if you like the magazine I suspect you'll like the posdcast.

    I've looked and looked and have not found a podcast with significant theory or technique content that I could listen to, if you know of any I'd like to hear about them. Good luck!
     
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  19. klasaine

    klasaine Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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    Doesn't it though?
    It may seem like an odd thing for a musician to say but it's the real deal ... which a lot of folks don't like hearing. It's also something that no one who does podcasts and makes YT vids would ever say. Why would they.

    Yes, 90% of everything I learned and know came from listening to music, emulating and then applying and adapting to the actual playing of music. The book learning came later, after I knew how to play a bit (a bit being very relative). My college music education was performance focused. Everything was about application.
    Sure, you can glean some stuff watching youtube vids, etc. but music is an auditory art. I 'know' a lot about music but I'll be the first to tell you that reading about music and listening to people talk about music - it's not even the icing on the cake. It's the sprinkles on top of that icing. I learned more about jazz from transcribing just a handful of bebop solos than I did from any book or lecture. Same for rock, blues, funk and everything else. The best teachers are the one's that tell you what to listen to. Work on that and only then discuss it.

    Now, talking with musicians live and in living color, especially with instrument in hand if possible, is absolutely beneficial. Bouncing stuff off each other. As teletail alluded to above, you need feedback and interaction. Even a forum like this can be helpful because there is at least a back and forth.

    *As I noted in my first post, Keith Jarrett is a good one to listen to "talk about music". telemaster03 mentions Tom Bukovac (Nashville session ace). He's got a great personality so yeah, he's entertaining. Robben Ford has a YT series named 'No Talking', which is exactly that - no words, just music. Rick Beato is cool but he's running out of $h1t to talk about. Most of the youtubers are scrapping the bottom of the barrel. And that illustrates my point - you can only talk so much about music.
     
    Last edited: Jan 27, 2021
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  20. Jeremy_Green

    Jeremy_Green Tele-Meister

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    I would have to disagree somewhat... yes of course you are right, in the the VAST majority of learning comes in the actual music itself. For sure. However, once you get to a certain level - in that you know all your scales and common chords etc - and it gets down to how you actually apply and make music? In this area, it is as much about managing your headspace as it is about the nuts and bolts of it. I have had so many tiny nuggets I have pulled out of interviews/podcasts etc. It may not be much.. but it is a CRITICAL piece that I absolutely needed to hear.

    There's that old martial arts saying that goes something like: "When the student is ready, the teacher appears" and there is SOOOO much wisdom in that.

    For example from my life. I remember listening to Steve Morse speak - back in the 90's. He said: " Someone should be able to come into your practice room while you are shedding, at any time, and feel the time and tempo." ... seemed obvious to me at the time, but man has that advice helped me. Didn't help me then of course. Because I was all about modes this and chords/time signatures that. Went right over my head. Years later, I just for whatever reason GOT IT and MAN has it paid dividends. Not sprinkles level brother - the cake itself!

    The problem with advice and comments on the net, or on a forum, is that people here are all on different levels and want different things from the instrument. Our comments can be absolutely correct for a lot of levels, but not all imo. The headspace thing is very overlooked, but managing your mind while playing is the brass ring imo.

    Respectfully of course.
     
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