Please explain why Ian is a historic hurricane

fjblair

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Historical? Look at Hugo that was very close to a Cat5 when it directly hit Charleston. Several historical landmarks and areas destroyed,20' surges,areas that looked like nukes had been dropped. Bad winds,rain,hurricanes all the way across SC (we live in Greer and had torrential rain,wind,and a tornado 1/2 mile from our house touched down and stayed on the ground for roughly 1 mile) up into the Charlotte area. My wife has an aunt that lives in Gastonia. Their neighbor had their roof torn off.
Hugo was definitely a historical hurricane.
 

PhoenixBill

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Ian doesn’t have to be quite as catastrophic as Katrina or as powerful as Hugo to deserve the “historic” label. It qualifies because it’s a very powerful storm, hitting a heavily populated area—an area which rarely gets hit by hurricanes—and very serious damage has been inflicted. I don’t understand why people are intent on downplaying the significance of this storm. Do they think this is “fake” or a “hoax”?
 

chris m.

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I think one of the things that will make this historic is that it will be the last straw- catalyst for a major re-think about how to finance all of this human infrastructure when it is clearly at risk of being destroyed again. Less than 20% of the affected homes had flood insurance. The maximum grant folks can get from FEMA is $37k. Insurance companies are going to take a major hit and will be thinking about how they can possibly afford to insure people in high risk areas in the future, at premiums that are affordable to the home owner.

And the prognosis is that it just gets worse. The hurricanes on average will continue to become stronger, and the resultant storm surge will be on top of a sea level that is already higher. And the total rainfall will be substantially higher.

Whether it be Pakistan, Kentucky, Texas, Puerto Rico, or Florida, there are now huge questions about how to build, and where to build, in a manner that is sustainable and makes sense. I think a lot of recent events reveal how woefully behind we have been in upgrading infrastructure. We've basically been relying on the infrastructure that was built from the 50s into the 70s and haven't been investing much at all since that time. For years we have been only replacing things once they break, often in a catastrophic manner.
 

Telekarster

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We've basically been relying on the infrastructure that was built from the 50s

My Grandparents grew up and lived their lives in the Norfolk/VA beach area, long long ago. I remember my Grandmother telling me that when she was a little girl there were great dunes as far as the eye could see, and you had to basically be a mountain climber to go over them if you wanted to get to the beach. She said in the 50's they bulldozed em to the ground when the building started happening, so people could have an unobstructed view of the ocean with their new beach house. Prior to the 50's most people didn't want to be that close to the water, and rarely went to the beach because it was such a chore to climb those great dunes. She said the dunes protected the inlands naturally but after they bulldozed em... well... nothing to keep that water out. She said that the dunes would likely build themselves back up, over time, if they were ever given a chance to do so :rolleyes: She died in 1998 at 100 years old.
 

Papanate

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My Grandparents grew up and lived their lives in the Norfolk/VA beach area, long long ago. I remember my Grandmother telling me that when she was a little girl there were great dunes as far as the eye could see, and you had to basically be a mountain climber to go over them if you wanted to get to the beach. She said in the 50's they bulldozed em to the ground when the building started happening, so people could have an unobstructed view of the ocean with their new beach house. Prior to the 50's most people didn't want to be that close to the water, and rarely went to the beach because it was such a chore to climb those great dunes. She said the dunes protected the inlands naturally but after they bulldozed em... well... nothing to keep that water out. She said that the dunes would likely build themselves back up, over time, if they were ever given a chance to do so :rolleyes: She died in 1998 at 100 years old.
Some People are plain greedy and stupid - we build on the ground wood houses in a major hurricane alley - Why? The infrastructure is wrecked all the time and not replaced with hurricane proof infrastructure - why? The list goes on - and I know it's controversial but if people choose to live in a dangerous zone - and refuse to get out when warned - they shouldn't be bailed out - Peoples greed - they build all the structures - don't pay for any infrastructure improvements - etc... and peoples lack of foresight - they live in dangerous areas - should preclude any bailout - any rescues as far as I'm concerned.
 

PhoenixBill

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I think one of the things that will make this historic is that it will be the last straw- catalyst for a major re-think about how to finance all of this human infrastructure when it is clearly at risk of being destroyed again. Less than 20% of the affected homes had flood insurance. The maximum grant folks can get from FEMA is $37k. Insurance companies are going to take a major hit and will be thinking about how they can possibly afford to insure people in high risk areas in the future, at premiums that are affordable to the home owner.

And the prognosis is that it just gets worse. The hurricanes on average will continue to become stronger, and the resultant storm surge will be on top of a sea level that is already higher. And the total rainfall will be substantially higher.

Whether it be Pakistan, Kentucky, Texas, Puerto Rico, or Florida, there are now huge questions about how to build, and where to build, in a manner that is sustainable and makes sense. I think a lot of recent events reveal how woefully behind we have been in upgrading infrastructure. We've basically been relying on the infrastructure that was built from the 50s into the 70s and haven't been investing much at all since that time. For years we have been only replacing things once they break, often in a catastrophic manner.
Sadly, I don’t see anything being done. Powerful forces are actively preventing too many people from recognizing a problem, and they certainly don’t care enough to make the sacrifices required to enact change. We should probably refrain from further elaboration.
 

reactor99

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Hurricanes tend to run in cycles - the 30s were bad, 60s thru 80s calmer.

2005 was a terrible year, and they said to expect more to come. But things went the other way, and no Cat 3/4/5 storms made landfall on the continental US until 2016. It's really hard to predict this stuff.

Edited - typo
 

chris m.

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Well, like the BIG ONE that is eventually coming to California, getting hit by a major hurricane if you live in hurricane alley is not a question of IF, but of WHEN. And the odds can be modeled, and the models can factor in expected climate change effects. Suffice it to say that for a lot of areas structures will be hit multiple times over what would be the expected useful life of the structure.
 

buster poser

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I think one of the things that will make this historic is that it will be the last straw- catalyst for a major re-think about how to finance all of this human infrastructure when it is clearly at risk of being destroyed again. Less than 20% of the affected homes had flood insurance. The maximum grant folks can get from FEMA is $37k. Insurance companies are going to take a major hit and will be thinking about how they can possibly afford to insure people in high risk areas in the future, at premiums that are affordable to the home owner.

And the prognosis is that it just gets worse. The hurricanes on average will continue to become stronger, and the resultant storm surge will be on top of a sea level that is already higher. And the total rainfall will be substantially higher.

Whether it be Pakistan, Kentucky, Texas, Puerto Rico, or Florida, there are now huge questions about how to build, and where to build, in a manner that is sustainable and makes sense. I think a lot of recent events reveal how woefully behind we have been in upgrading infrastructure. We've basically been relying on the infrastructure that was built from the 50s into the 70s and haven't been investing much at all since that time. For years we have been only replacing things once they break, often in a catastrophic manner.
Great post and yeah, seems like you could improve on this:

1664554645276.png


It's complicated no doubt. I saw these recommended earlier in the week and put them on the list.

1664554330766.png
1664554298606.png
 

Manual Slim

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I hope I'm not in the same insurance pool with cars like this or people who live in places that flood.

I wonder how the hurricane compares with Lizzo playing Madison's crystal flute. She said she was making history playing it.

View attachment 1035028
This is the kind of high-quality thread drift I show up for. Good work.
 

Knows3Chords

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What other practical solutions to suburban sprawl other than to cram everyone into high density urban housing do we have? People have been living close to oceans, rivers, and lakes since the beginning of it all. Will this scrutiny of living choice be the same when the big one hits L.A., San Francisco, or Seattle?
 

dogmeat

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"this storm marks the most powerful hurricane seen this season, it makes history as the ninth category 4 or 5 hurricane to hit the mainland U.S. in the last 50 years—six of which have occurred since just 2017."
 

getbent

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What other practical solutions to suburban sprawl other than to cram everyone into high density urban housing do we have? People have been living close to oceans, rivers, and lakes since the beginning of it all. Will this scrutiny of living choice be the same when the big one hits L.A., San Francisco, or Seattle?
already is scrutinized like crazy. The fires in california and the west have shown that the encroachment of neighborhoods into wildlands comes at an incredible cost. At some point, the scale will tip to the degree that there will be lots of people rethinking lots of things.

My daughter took a picture of the new starlink satellite over her neck of the woods... she does HR for movie stars and producers and rock stars and all kinds of talented people. Until about 3 years ago, she lived in Beverly Hills and her life was incredibly fast paced and LA traffic etc.

Today, she lives outside Bend, Oregon and her boss lives on her Kentucky horse farm.

I think there is no part of the world that will remain untouched by these awful events, but, I think we can spread out a bit and figure it out. But, yeah, all locales will have to consider the metrics.
 




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