Please explain why Ian is a historic hurricane

buster poser

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everything becomes history. yesterday, i tried the mcdonalds cheese danish. It was an historic moment. It is part of history.

I saw all the people claiming the media was overstating this hurricane when it was developing. Not so much now.

The news is just regular people who, for whatever reason, want to report news. Since they are just regular people, they are just as stupid as goldilocks, so, when they report the news, they try to figure out what fits, sometimes they nail it, sometimes they miss... the big question is, where WERE the three bears?

Coolio died yesterday, that impacted me emotionally far more than the Queen.... both are historic events... they happened in the past. See how it works?
Amen to all of that. There's a large subset of people who are quick to trumpet their jaded/oppositional affect about literally any event that impacts others. The ones I've talked to about it seem to be very sensitive to anyone thinking they might be taken in by sensationalism, and so preemptively deem everything just that. Unsurprisingly, many of these folks consume a staggering amount of sensationalist/conspiracist junk and yet are quite unsure of their myriad reactionary stances, so you get into the performative aspect of it, which they think makes them come off like The Fonz, but is transparently Ralph Malph.

I'm just trying to imagine being so confident in my ignorance that I proclaim a hurricane a non-event while it's still over the ocean. I think the aftermath we've seen today might make me pause and reconsider my worldview, but then you don't get that way from being introspective. So it goes.
 

getbent

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Amen to all of that. There's a large subset of people who are quick to trumpet their jaded/oppositional affect about literally any event that impacts others. The ones I've talked to about it seem to be very sensitive to anyone thinking they might be taken in by sensationalism, and so preemptively deem everything just that. Unsurprisingly, many of these folks consume a staggering amount of sensationalist/conspiracist junk and yet are quite unsure of their myriad reactionary stances, so you get into the performative aspect of it, which they think makes them come off like The Fonz, but is transparently Ralph Malph.

I'm just trying to imagine being so confident in my ignorance that I proclaim a hurricane a non-event while it's still over the ocean. I think the aftermath we've seen today might make me pause and reconsider my worldview, but then you don't get that way from being introspective. So it goes.
it is about forgiveness. genuine forgiveness and grace.

gotta forgive those trespasses.

I just hope folks make out okay and that folks can pull together and get the help they are going to need. We had our big fire 2 years ago now and I spent yesterday (all day into the night) helping people who lost their places two years ago. The event is harrowing. The recovering a long, slow, steep climb with no guarantees.

Hang in there friends in Florida.. we are rooting hard for you.
 

Wheelhouse

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Anytime you evacuate 2.5 MILLION people, with expected damage in the BILLION$$$ it's historical...
First, population growth means that every evacuation will be bigger than previous evacuations. Same applies to damage, but more so since inflation is currently very high. Inflation from the time of hurricane Katrina to present day is over 50%. Increased coastal populations and increased coastal property values will have every cat 4-5 storm landing on an urban area a multi-billion dollar storm. So the statement here falls into line with the "everything is historical" dismissal if you look at more than casually.

Not saying this particular situation isn't far more serious than most storms, but this statement on its own doesn't make the case.
 

Telekarster

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it is about forgiveness. genuine forgiveness and grace.

gotta forgive those trespasses.

I just hope folks make out okay and that folks can pull together and get the help they are going to need. We had our big fire 2 years ago now and I spent yesterday (all day into the night) helping people who lost their places two years ago. The event is harrowing. The recovering a long, slow, steep climb with no guarantees.

Hang in there friends in Florida.. we are rooting hard for you.

FWIW I'm already in discussions with the wife about heading down there to help out our friends and family. It's still going on so have to wait until everything is said and done, debris cleared from roadways, water subsidence, power restored, etc. etc. before we can entertain the notion but we're already planning it. There will be shortages of all sorts of supplies, so might be loading up the truck and van etc. to bring things down if we need to, but right now we don't know what we don't know.

Please everyone keep the prayers strong and frequent for the foreseeable future! Amen! 🙏🙏🙏
 

buster poser

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it is about forgiveness. genuine forgiveness and grace.

gotta forgive those trespasses.

I just hope folks make out okay and that folks can pull together and get the help they are going to need. We had our big fire 2 years ago now and I spent yesterday (all day into the night) helping people who lost their places two years ago. The event is harrowing. The recovering a long, slow, steep climb with no guarantees.

Hang in there friends in Florida.. we are rooting hard for you.
"I'm tryin Ringo. I'm tryin real hard to be the shepherd."

I hear you. I take some pity on the ignorant, but the internet as spigot-for-contrarianism is a lot to absorb sometimes, especially when it caustically minimizes actual suffering.

Edit: Or minimizes this.

 

BoomTexan

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It's going to create a lot of pain and suffering for sure. What we don't need is a hysterical Weather Channel reporter yelling hysterically that she can see a trash can floating down the street, or the guy pointing to fallen palm fronds.
As a lifelong resident of Houston, and someone who has gone through Hurricane Ike and Harvey, water in the streets doesn't bother me. Palm fronds fall by themselves pretty often. This doesn't phase many of us coast dwellers. The scariest things are the things that don't look scary whatsoever. Feeling the tires of a car slide out from under you due to water on the road when evacuating Houston at 9PM in the pitch black raining cats and dogs is scary, but you really can't capture that on camera. The real scary feeling is the feeling of dread at the months and years of renovations ahead, and wondering whether the water will continue to get higher, but you can't capture that either.

So weather reports show submerged cars and people up north who aren't affected or used to this stuff think "OH MY GOODNESS" and stay for the commercial break to watch more, and then continue on with their lives. None of that is scary to the people involved, it's not knowing what lies ahead or fearing for the lives of friends and family members in lower places. Not stuff you can capture on camera or really describe.

If I can get a break from college soon and get some friends together, I'm planning to spend a week helping those who will be affected (soon) in Georgia, like my family was helped by people from Louisiana, Mississippi, and Florida in the months after Harvey and Ike. I know that Texas (and Houston in particular) has a long history of sending inordinate amounts of relief to other states after every hurricane, and I want to continue that tradition in Georgia.
 

ChicknPickn

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As a lifelong resident of Houston, and someone who has gone through Hurricane Ike and Harvey, water in the streets doesn't bother me. Palm fronds fall by themselves pretty often. This doesn't phase many of us coast dwellers. The scariest things are the things that don't look scary whatsoever. Feeling the tires of a car slide out from under you due to water on the road when evacuating Houston at 9PM in the pitch black raining cats and dogs is scary, but you really can't capture that on camera. The real scary feeling is the feeling of dread at the months and years of renovations ahead, and wondering whether the water will continue to get higher, but you can't capture that either.

So weather reports show submerged cars and people up north who aren't affected or used to this stuff think "OH MY GOODNESS" and stay for the commercial break to watch more, and then continue on with their lives. None of that is scary to the people involved, it's not knowing what lies ahead or fearing for the lives of friends and family members in lower places. Not stuff you can capture on camera or really describe.

If I can get a break from college soon and get some friends together, I'm planning to spend a week helping those who will be affected (soon) in Georgia, like my family was helped by people from Louisiana, Mississippi, and Florida in the months after Harvey and Ike. I know that Texas (and Houston in particular) has a long history of sending inordinate amounts of relief to other states after every hurricane, and I want to continue that tradition in Georgia.
Well said. As a coastal Virginian, I’ve largely been fortunate - - the losses were inconvenient, but easily survived. I think all of us on hurricane paths see these latest images and think, But for the grace of God . . . .
 

P Thought

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One of my very best friends who also happens to be more than just a little dumb has been texting me. She lives in Naples at below 12’ and has no power and I’ve been texting her the announcement to shelter in place as she can no longer leave.
Worried. Girl, why? Be safe LW.
This is highly troubling.



Edit: all my best wishes to all Floridians, and all responders.
 
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stxrus

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I think the word “historical” tends to be used for sensationalizing an event like this. “Unprecedented” to me is more correct word. But then I’m not trying to draw viewership or create ad revenue.

To me the, advent of 2 Cat5 storms hitting the territory 12 days apart could be called historical. Irma and Maria did quite the number on us as well as Puerto Rico. That was unprecedented
 

dogmeat

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going from a tropical storm to Cat 4 in about 20 hours is not the normal

it is also producing a "500 year" flood in parts of FL

as I understand, its back down to a TS status on land but is expected to go to at least Cat 1 when it gets back to the ocean. my son lives 50 miles north of Orlando
 

dogmeat

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a friend sent this a bit ago...

1664479410512.png
 

micpoc

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I was actually curious about the difference between "historic" and "historical". One way of looking at it is, ANYTHING that happened in the past is "historical", while major events are "historic".

So, all past hurricanes are historical, and Hurricane Ian is absolutely historic.

I've been through them, including evacuating for Katrina in 2005, and they are nothing to mess around with.
 

Alamo

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I don't know the reason behind it being historic. I know it's become a cat5.

I do know these storms are going to happen more often due to warming.

Thoughts?
IDK too.
maybe it's the vintage historically accurate way - that hurricanes used to be.

gee, whizz! that's a real original one o_O
 




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