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Plan for new build. Wood jointer?

Discussion in 'Tele Home Depot' started by justin72deluxe, Feb 27, 2011.

  1. justin72deluxe

    justin72deluxe Tele-Meister

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    I plan on starting a new build soon. I recently finished my templates and a test pickguard. I have built a handfull of guitars but have always used body blanks. This time I plan to buy poplar at my local Woodcraft store at 3.50 a board foot. From what I can tell by eyeballing it without taking measurements I will need to make a 2 or 3 piece body. This will be a first for me. I plan to build a router sled to thickness plane the body. What I'm not sure about is joining the 2 or 3 pieces. I dont have a wood jointer so I'm looking for a low cost alternative. A hand plane, a handheld jointer? What have you guys come up with to accomplish this?
     
  2. Jack Wells

    Jack Wells Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    Find a cabinet shop and pay them a few bucks to joint the edges for you. It's probably a 5 minute job so it shouldn't be much. Maybe the Woodcraft store would do it for you. Don't they give woodworking classes?
     
  3. justin72deluxe

    justin72deluxe Tele-Meister

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    Yeah, I asked them and they said they can only cut the wood. As far as the classes, I think I remember that they only teach wood turning and router basics.
     
  4. guitar2005

    guitar2005 Tele-Holic

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    A router and a straightedge works for truing up edges. A good table saw can give you excellent edges as well.
     
  5. justin72deluxe

    justin72deluxe Tele-Meister

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    Thanks. I have thought about building a fence onto my homemade router table. Thoughts?
     
  6. guitar2005

    guitar2005 Tele-Holic

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    Sounds like a great plan. Make sure you have a straightedge for checking the fence and spacers on the outfeed for controlling the level of material removed.
     
    Last edited: Feb 27, 2011
  7. Beatbx

    Beatbx Tele-Meister

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    I bought 14" plane to join body blanks and it worked great. It required some research to sharpen the iron and set it up properly and it cuts like buttah, nice joints resulting.
     
  8. Engraver-60

    Engraver-60 Friend of Leo's

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    If you use a router table and fence, remember it's like a jointer, so the outfeed side has to be the same plane as the cutter peaks. Don't ask me how I know.

    The other way is to clamp a known straight piece (i.e., a piece of laminated cabinet splash) and have your tracer bit follow that. That's what I ended up doing; worked fine.
     
  9. Colt W. Knight

    Colt W. Knight Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    A handheld jointer isn't going to do anything for you, and handplane is tricky to use, tune, and maintain. People used hand planes for years and years, so they will work just fine. however, its not something you are going to get the hang of quickly. A good hand plane new, cost around the same price as a power jointer. Good deals can be found on old ones, but you have to know how to restore and maintain them. Plus, you have to learn to use them.

    Since you have a router, I would simply use a straight edge and a bearing guided bit to joint your edges.

    I would joint the pieces before you thicknessed the wood. That way, if its a little off, thicknessing will straighten out the blank.
     
  10. mcgeorgerl

    mcgeorgerl Tele-Meister

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    Before I got a decent jointer, I went the router method but didn't have to joint boards over 1". Not sure how that would work with wood nearly 2".

    I'd try the router method then sweeten the joint by glueing some sandpaper to something dead flat and sanding the board's jointed edge. If you clamp two boards together and sweeten the two edges simultaneously, any slight angular error will cancel out.

    Fortunately, I have a "spare" cast iron wing for the Rigid since I replaced it with a Router Wing. It always has some 100 grit on it for just this purpose. Not everybody's jointer produces perfectly flat and tool mark free surfaces.
     
  11. Maricopa

    Maricopa Friend of Leo's

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    +100 on finding a local woodworker or woodshop to do the job. I 'borrowed' bandsaws, jointers and thickness sander in this way through many of my early builds and I still use another builders large jointer when I do Weissenborn-style top and back as they are simply too long for my 4" jointer to do very well.
     
  12. justin72deluxe

    justin72deluxe Tele-Meister

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  13. justin72deluxe

    justin72deluxe Tele-Meister

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    Sounds like that would work very well. Think I'll give this a try.
     
  14. Nick JD

    Nick JD Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    Any angular error when using a router as a jointer can be cancelled out by truing one glue face upside down to the other.

    91° on one side, 89° on the other = 180°.
     
  15. Jeff H

    Jeff H Tele-Meister

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    If you were nearby I'd do it . I make furniture professionaly and would not mind a 10 minute interruption. Simple job.

    There has got to be a college or high school wood working shop near you with someone willing to do this for you.
     
  16. ievans

    ievans Tele-Meister

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  17. justin72deluxe

    justin72deluxe Tele-Meister

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    Here is melomanarockere's build thread. In the first post he shows how he did it with a sled, looks good to me. Thoughts?
     
  18. justin72deluxe

    justin72deluxe Tele-Meister

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  19. es125tcd

    es125tcd TDPRI Member

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    a good table saw, with a freud blade , works for me- ( carbide tip, atb, or triple chip grind) , then glue and clamp- verify 90 degree setting with a square( table top to blade - a square will show "daylight" if you're off) - works for me- fyi, GB
     
  20. Tom Pettingill

    Tom Pettingill Tele-Holic

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    Excellent tip and applicable even when using other means like a table saw or even a flatbed jointer.
     
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