1. Win a Broadcaster or one of 3 Teles! The annual Supporting Member Giveaway is on. To enter Click Here. To see all the prizes and full details Click Here. To view the thread about the giveaway Click Here.

Pining for Pine?

Discussion in 'Tele Home Depot' started by El Chivo, Oct 12, 2015.

  1. El Chivo

    El Chivo Tele-Meister

    Posts:
    382
    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2015
    Location:
    Los Angeles-ish
    I just started the luthier program at Musicians Institute and have a question for y'all. In class I've asked a couple questions about using Pine and have been told that it doesn't make a good wood for a build because it's "unstable." When I pushed for clarification I was asked why I was "fixated" on it.:lol: I was told that Pine is too soft a wood for guitars and that screws would eventually loosen and strip out. It seems that quite a few builders here have used this wood. What is your long-term experience with it?
     
  2. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

    Posts:
    23,470
    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2003
    Location:
    Ontario County
    That answer sounds like BS. Do a search here for pine body builds. I have made at least 50 bodies out of the stuff.

    A guy named Arlo West popularized the wood for tele builds a few years ago. His pix are gone but the threads remain.

    http://www.tdpri.com/forum/telecaster-discussion-forum/57082-barncaster-100-year-old-pine.html

    http://www.tdpri.com/forum/tele-home-depot/197040-maine-pinecaster-build.html


    http://www.tdpri.com/forum/tele-home-depot/166992-ol-piney-overhaul-2009-a.html

    http://www.tdpri.com/forum/guitar-owners-clubs/175019-pinecaster-club.html

    Oh by the way... the Fender Company makes pine telecasters and the squier line of Classic Vibe teles are pine bodied.

    http://www.ebay.com/itm/Fender-Old-...D&orig_cvip=true&rt=nc&_trksid=p2047675.l2557
     
  3. Mike Simpson

    Mike Simpson Doctor of Teleocity

    Posts:
    12,946
    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2006
    Location:
    Gilbert, AZ (PHX)
    I would not make a neck out of pine but it has been done. There is no reason not to use pine for a body... I have made 4 guitars with pine bodies and have around 400 gigs on one of them. Be aware that any knots will eventually be visible in the finish.

    If you get that kind of answer about pine I would be concerned about the actual knowledge of the instructor and what else is incorrect.
     
  4. Jack S

    Jack S Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    4,948
    Joined:
    Sep 25, 2008
    Location:
    Berwyn, IL
    One thing to consider is the age of the wood makes a large difference in how hard the wood can be and how well it will hold screws. If you have pine from a 100 year old barn, it will not at all be similar to a piece of wood you will buy at a lumber store, unless they specialize in old recycled lumber. I have some pine lumber that came out old houses that is pretty darned hard to just hammer a nail into, and that is the reason most contractors want to tear out old lumber and use newer stuff. It is much easier to work when they are trying to work fast and move onto the next job.
     
  5. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

    Posts:
    23,470
    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2003
    Location:
    Ontario County
    My last pinecaster was made from Lowes pine, including a pine neck. It's one of the nicer guitars I made the past few years. I went down one size on the neck screw pilot holes to allow them to make a bit of compression during the initial thread cutting compared to what the pilot hole chart said. No problem holding tight. If I was removing the neck regularly, I'd put some superglue down there. The body holes don't hold the neck in place anyway...They are a touch larger than the screws, and then there is the neck plate to provide support. The worst case scenario is that the plate will cause some mild indentation and compression on the bodywhen you torque the neck screws down. That can happen on any wood that has a lesser density.
     
  6. Ronkirn

    Ronkirn Doctor of Teleocity

    Age:
    74
    Posts:
    12,395
    Joined:
    May 1, 2003
    Location:
    Jacksonville, FL
    Generally.. the pine most are familiar with is construction grade. it's rarely dried to the 10% or less most choose for furniture, guitars, or anything similar...

    it can warp crack, split, all kinda things ya don't want your guitar doing after you've completed it...'

    Ya have to be careful when suppliers throw around ambiguous words like Stable. Like what?? ya mean if ya sit it on a flat surface it wobbles... or if surrounded by a "focused" explosion it goes radioactive and explodes... or if you have it in your trunk and hit some bumps it explodes (nitro ya know)... ;)


    However, there are many quality lumber suppliers that can provide properly dried pine, which is every bit as good as any other generally "approved" lumber commonly used for guitars.

    One caution, Pine is usually a pretty resinous species, any amount of drying will not address that goop.. only time allows the sap to solidify...

    there is some old fat guy that posts occasionally here that makes a lotta guitars from really old pine, and has has considerable success with 'em. but he's stuck in NE Florida, surrounded by hillbillies... and distracted by the Game the Gators will be playing next week..

    Ron Kirn
     
  7. niilolainen

    niilolainen Tele-Meister

    Posts:
    146
    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2012
    Location:
    Helsinki, Finland
    Squire Class Vibe 50s Tele has a pine body.

    So does my Vintage Modified Squier P-Bass. Heavy as anything...
     
  8. Tear

    Tear TDPRI Member

    Posts:
    90
    Joined:
    May 6, 2015
    Location:
    Columbus, OH
  9. TRexF16

    TRexF16 Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    4,044
    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2011
    Location:
    Tucson
    If there's a building materials salvage yard anywhere nearby, take a trip over there. Look at both the pine beams they have as well as the old reclaimed doors. If you can find old beams that are 2" or more thick (4" is great, you can resaw it!) you'll be way better off than using Construction grade dimensioned lumber.

    Rex
     
  10. trev333

    trev333 Telefied Ad Free Member

    Posts:
    26,721
    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2009
    Location:
    Coolum Beach,Australia
    this old pine table was like hardwood to work with...

    the finished blank was @ 4 1/2 - 5 lbs.... not heavy.... hard as hell to sand/rout, though... 250 grit would just polish it and ruin the paper, without hardly a scratch...I think I finished it with fresh 120?.......;)

    there's Pine.. and then there's Pine....:lol:
     

    Attached Files:

  11. Zipslack

    Zipslack Tele-Meister

    Posts:
    383
    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2011
    Location:
    Mississippi
    I would always worry about sap/resin. Unless it's 100 years old, you never know when temp changes will causes it to come out to haunt you and ruin the finish.
     
  12. Mr. Lumbergh

    Mr. Lumbergh Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    8,561
    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2013
    Location:
    Initech, Inc.
    That's a beaut Trev.
     
  13. TRexF16

    TRexF16 Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    4,044
    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2011
    Location:
    Tucson
    Thiscan be mostly controlled by using shellac as the initial finish under lacquer. It's a great sap sealer.

    Rex
     
  14. Tear

    Tear TDPRI Member

    Posts:
    90
    Joined:
    May 6, 2015
    Location:
    Columbus, OH
    zinnser bulls eye is what i used to seal up my build
     
IMPORTANT: Treat everyone here with respect, no matter how difficult!
No sex, drug, political, religion or hate discussion permitted here.