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Pinholes after priming?

Discussion in 'Finely Finished' started by ElCampesino, Nov 12, 2013.

  1. ElCampesino

    ElCampesino TDPRI Member

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    Hi everybody,

    First of all I have to say this is an awesome forum. I just started my first tele build project (from a kit without a manual) and found just about all I needed to know right here.

    I decided to do an olympic white solid nitro finish on the ash body I bought. Over the past few weeks I got through shaping a belly cut and arm contour, grain filling, sanding, applying sanding sealer (nitro), sanding, and spraying a couple of layers of primer (nitro).

    But now I have run into a problem. While the primer coat is nice and even on just about the entire body, on two small areas there are a few super small pinholes where the primer seems to have been 'sucked in'. My take is that those are pores that the grain filler maybe hasn't caught or something.

    I'm really not ready to sand the whole lot off again and restart at the grain filling step.

    Is there any way I can fix that? My thought was to use some wood putty to locally fill the holes, do some light sanding and add another layer of primer. Or can I just proceed with the color and transparent coats and expect them to fill up the holes?

    Anyone with experience who knows what to do?

    Rob
     
  2. DrASATele

    DrASATele Poster Extraordinaire

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    Rob, do you have access to super glue or epoxy?
    I would run a thin layer of super glue into that area, sand it, then prime that area white snad flat then go to your clear coat. IME if you go to the clear coat now you'll see shadows of those pinholes in the finish at the end depending on where they are it might or might not be acceptable.
     
  3. bullfrogblues

    bullfrogblues Friend of Leo's

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    Might be able to drop fill the pinholes with the same primer using a toothpick, then block sand flat. Keep doing that until the pinholes are gone.
     
  4. ElCampesino

    ElCampesino TDPRI Member

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    Chris, Bullfrog, thanks for the replies. Drop filling with primer seems to be a promising approach. However, the primer comes in a spray can so I can't do that. I'll try to drop fill using superglue instead, and see where it takes me. Will let you know how it turned out!

    Rob
     
  5. Drum Strummer

    Drum Strummer TDPRI Member

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    Rob,

    Just spray some primer into the cap itself (outside as it's a little messy) or some other small container and then dip a tooth pick into your puddle of primer to drop fill.

    I used this method on my first build and it worked well. I fought pin holes so much I thought I was loosing my mind.

    Good luck
     
  6. ElCampesino

    ElCampesino TDPRI Member

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    Hey Drum, great piece of advice. Your method will have to wait until the next time the problem arises, though. Just finished up my super glue effort while you were typing. Not sure yet if I'm completely happy with the results. Pinholes are filled alright, but it took some serious sanding to get the spots level again. Up until the point that right next to some of the spots the wood started to come through again. Reapplied primer on all the spots, but now the edges of where the super glue went are clearly visible. It appears that I can quite easily sand those back down once the primer dries out, but I'm pretty sure just using primer and drop filling would have given me better results.

    I guess these are the lessons you learn with a first build...

    Will check back in later to report on the progress after some more sanding.
     
  7. CapnCrunch

    CapnCrunch Friend of Leo's

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    I've not tried this with CA glue, but have used this trick when drop filling lacquer to quickly remove the "bumps" from drop filling.

    Take a straight razor blade and place masking tape over both ends of the blade. Leave a section 1/4 to 3/8 of an inch wide uncovered in the middle of the blade. You can then let the tape ride on the finished surface and use the uncovered middle section to scrape the bump. It will leave it proud of the surface by the thickness of the tape, but it is way faster than sanding and leaves a very manageable amount to sand. There is no other way that I know to take the bump down without sanding through all around the bump.

    Not sure how this will work with CA, but it works like a dream with lacquer. I suspect it will also work with glue.
     
  8. bullfrogblues

    bullfrogblues Friend of Leo's

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    That's why I suggested drop filling with the primer, and Drum explained how to do it very easily. I've never been happy with a super glue drop fill, no matter what it was on.
    Now you are seeing "witness lines" of the two different materials.
     
  9. Luthier Atlanta

    Luthier Atlanta Tele-Afflicted

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    Try this first.....
     
  10. DrASATele

    DrASATele Poster Extraordinaire

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    Wow, great idea Capn! I ruined a finish with a razorblade trying to shave off a bit of a bulge, but the tape thing I hadn't thought of. I'm stealing this for sure!

    Drop filling with Super glue is difficult. I do a whole area so sand throughs and witness lines can be managed a little better. I find I cinstantly have to re-drop fill when I do just the primer and if I don't get enough in, I get like a smooth pock mark/divet in the final finish. IME
     
  11. Drum Strummer

    Drum Strummer TDPRI Member

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    I dropped filled 1 pin hole with CA (super glue) and wound up sanding the entire body back to square one because I could see the CA "ring" in the finish. I posted pics on my build thread (right after I finished cursing). It set me back an entire week of dry time. Now I'm proficient in drop filling primer and lacquer. I will have to try Capncrunch's modified drop fill scraper technique. I've sanded several drop fill spots which could have been knocked out quickly had I known of a way to limit the damage me and a razor blade can do. Great tip.
     
  12. ElCampesino

    ElCampesino TDPRI Member

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    A quick update on my progress. Sanding down the 'witness lines' of the super glue improved the situation quite a bit. I can still see the areas where the glue was applied, but it's a lot less visible now. I decided to accept the fact they're there and hope that they will become even less visible in subsequent stages.

    I sanded the whole primer coat smooth and I am ready to do my first color coats. Pretty exciting!

    One question about preparation though before I head out to my makeshift paint booth. I wiped down the body with a dry cloth and it seems to be pretty clean. Do I need to use naphta or a damp cloth or something to really get it super clean before I apply any color?

    Rob
     
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