1. Win a Broadcaster or one of 3 Teles! The annual Supporting Member Giveaway is on. To enter Click Here. To see all the prizes and full details Click Here. To view the thread about the giveaway Click Here.

Pine Tele body advice

Discussion in 'Finely Finished' started by Urshurak776, Jan 15, 2021.

  1. Urshurak776

    Urshurak776 Tele-Holic

    Posts:
    944
    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2004
    Location:
    Charlotte
    4BE77109-4F89-462F-A1E7-17FD1935C885.jpeg Hello everyone. I am putting together a partscaster with a pine body. The neck I am using is pretty dark. I planned to just tru-oil the body, but wondering if I should darken it a bit before the tru-oil? I’m worried the contrast between body and neck might be too much.
     

    Attached Files:

  2. Mr. Lumbergh

    Mr. Lumbergh Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    8,504
    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2013
    Location:
    Initech, Inc.
    I probably would, that is a lot of contrast. I wouldn't take it so dark you can't see the knots though, that's part of the appeal of a pine body for me.
     
  3. Addnine

    Addnine Tele-Meister

    Age:
    72
    Posts:
    444
    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2019
    Location:
    New England
    Pine can get pretty wild if you stain it. I'd go very cautiously, maybe with diluted washes of stain, or seal the wood first, which can mitigate the blotchiness.
     
  4. ndcaster

    ndcaster Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    9,590
    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2013
    Location:
    Indiana
    Some contrast is really nice.

    You could finish the body with some platina shellac, the palest amber. I've used WellerMart dewaxed shellac in 2 oz packets, about $15. Dissolve 2 oz in 1 cup of denatured alcohol to make what's called "2 lb. cut."

    Platina is very slightly ambered. You can find pictures online of color gradations.

    If you're worried about durability (I'm not), you can hit shellac later with a thin layer of clear poly.

    Another good option is Solarez, usually used for surfboards. You spread it on in a darkened room, then take it out to cure quickly in full sunlight. If you leave the body in a sunny place, it will amber up nicely.
     
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2021
  5. Urshurak776

    Urshurak776 Tele-Holic

    Posts:
    944
    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2004
    Location:
    Charlotte
    Thanks all. I definitely want to still be able to see the knots and grain. I just want to darken/amber it up a bit. Appreciate the suggestions on conditioning first. Pine takes stain weird somethings......
     
  6. Urshurak776

    Urshurak776 Tele-Holic

    Posts:
    944
    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2004
    Location:
    Charlotte
    @ndcaster thanks for the suggestion. I’ll look into that. I don’t have a lot of experience finishing guitars so this will all be new to me.
     
  7. Danb541

    Danb541 Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    2,082
    Joined:
    Nov 27, 2019
    Location:
    Oregon
    Rub a little tru-oil in one of the pickup cavities. You might be surprised, I bet it darkens/ambers the color a little bit. It might be just enough.
     
  8. El Tele Lobo

    El Tele Lobo Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    6,189
    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2014
    Location:
    Florida
    If you put enough coats of Tru-Oil on there it should darken quite a bit. Look up my threads about my Jazzbo Hepcaster reverse Esquire for an example. I used 30 coats on that body.
     
    Collin D Plonker and Urshurak776 like this.
  9. Freeman Keller

    Freeman Keller Poster Extraordinaire

    Age:
    76
    Posts:
    5,608
    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2018
    Location:
    Washington
    These are hundred year old Ponderosa pine from an old barn. The first one is finished in lacquer, the second TruOil. Neither had any stains or other color added. The first has a maple neck with rosewood f/b, the second has a rosewood neck with rose f/b

    IMG_2366-1.jpg

    IMG_4024.JPG

    I think TruOil is an acceptable finish for pine, I wouldn't use it on other woods.
     
    El Tele Lobo and Urshurak776 like this.
  10. Novak

    Novak Tele-Meister

    Age:
    69
    Posts:
    216
    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2017
    Location:
    Los Angeles
    FYI Pine is used to frame houses,make closets and build outdoor sh*t houses. It was never meant to be used for guitar construction. It is cheap, fast-growing weed of a wood. DO NOT use it to build a musical instrument for the Love of God.
     
  11. bender66

    bender66 Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    7,415
    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2010
    Location:
    on my bike
    Sounds perfect for a telecaster then.
     
  12. Sparky2

    Sparky2 Friend of Leo's

    Age:
    61
    Posts:
    3,621
    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2017
    Location:
    Harvest, Alabama
    I agree.

    Pine, by that definition and description, is well suited to become a Telecaster.
    From both a physical and aesthetic (maybe even spiritual) standpoint.

    Bender 66, I have (and have owned) T-style guitars with bodies made of poplar, ash, alder, basswood, and pine.

    If you were to walk up to me two years ago, or perhaps two years from now, and ask me, "which of these Teles are/were your favorite to gig with?", I would say the two pine ones.
    (One made for me by a local craftsman, and the other a 2012 Fender Modern Player Telecaster Plus.)

    I dig all of them, don't get me wrong.
    But I guess I have always bonded with the 'less is more', trailer park trash notion of pine body guitars.

    Growing up in and out of the Deep South, I must also confess that I have an affinity for pine forests, and my own property here on a spring fed creek is populated with many tall, gorgeous pines.
    And yes, Novak, they do indeed grow like weeds.

    :)

    [​IMG]
     
  13. Mark the Moose

    Mark the Moose Tele-Afflicted

    Age:
    45
    Posts:
    1,255
    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2018
    Location:
    Erie, CO
    Dude has a pine body ready to role, what’s the point of telling him not to use a pine body? It’ll sound great and be a fun project.

    It’ll be soft so maybe plan on a good, heavy, hard finish. As mentioned pine absorbs stain very unevenly, sanding sealer will be an important step. Test your sealing/stain/finish procedure on a piece of scrap board before going after the body.
     
  14. Urshurak776

    Urshurak776 Tele-Holic

    Posts:
    944
    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2004
    Location:
    Charlotte
    Thanks to everyone. Lots to think about. I have some 2x4 pieces I am going to sound down and try some ideas. Thanks again!!!
     
  15. Mark the Moose

    Mark the Moose Tele-Afflicted

    Age:
    45
    Posts:
    1,255
    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2018
    Location:
    Erie, CO
    2x4s are usually hemlock, maybe grab a piece of pine at Your local lumber store?
     
    Urshurak776 likes this.
  16. Novak

    Novak Tele-Meister

    Age:
    69
    Posts:
    216
    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2017
    Location:
    Los Angeles
    BTW pine is subject to warpage/porosity and doesn't hold screws or other fasteners well. I used to work in a furniture factory; we used every local wood except pine.
     
  17. jvin248

    jvin248 Doctor of Teleocity

    Posts:
    10,055
    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2014
    Location:
    Lions & Tigers oh Mi !
    .

    Perhaps you are looking for making the body look something like this. This is alder with walnut and maple strip inlays. There was a lot of layers of stain on/stain off, feathering the stain to the rim for a slight burst, and so on before the tru-oil finish was applied. I wanted a lived-in look because this guitar had been abused, discarded, stripped, repainted, repaired, then stripped again.

    [​IMG]


    Search for 'how to stain pine' can bring up suggestions. Start with scrap wood until you get close to what you want.
    https://www.popularwoodworking.com/projects/staining-pine/



    Only if you believe wood is magically imparting talent to your playing, or read too many marketing brochures from companies trying to sell you stuff. Wood is there to look nice and hold all the other parts in their respective locations, and provide the ergonomics that determine how you play a guitar (Strat volume knob causes more picking closer to the neck to avoid hitting it, LPs cause palm muting and picking on the inside of the bridge pickup, Teles cause picking between the pickup and saddles where Twang hangs out. Tone is most effected by the pickups+pots 'n caps.

    If you want fast growing ... look up Agathis and Paulownia. Those woods might just save the planet when used for guitar building rather than ripping exotic lumber out of the fragile rain forest ecosystems.

    .
     
  18. El Tele Lobo

    El Tele Lobo Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    6,189
    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2014
    Location:
    Florida
    I have 4 teles. All have pine bodies (one has an ash top). All play and sound great and hold their hardware just fine. One has had a couple stripped screw holes that I have easily fixed with the "toothpick trick".

    Remember, there are different grades and hardnesses of pine...both by species and even within the same tree. I've had a few crappy pine bodies that were basically garbage that I bought for cheap to experiment with. But my better pine bodies have stood the test of time and continue to.
     
    Urshurak776 and RomanS like this.
  19. Mike Simpson

    Mike Simpson Doctor of Teleocity

    Posts:
    12,908
    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2006
    Location:
    Gilbert, AZ (PHX)
    Pine is great to make guitars and amps out of.

    51 pro amp.jpg
    IMG_1073.JPG
    IMG_1074.JPG
     
  20. Mike Simpson

    Mike Simpson Doctor of Teleocity

    Posts:
    12,908
    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2006
    Location:
    Gilbert, AZ (PHX)
    These are pine too.

    114-1442c.jpg
    img00356a.jpg
     
    Urshurak776 and RomanS like this.
IMPORTANT: Treat everyone here with respect, no matter how difficult!
No sex, drug, political, religion or hate discussion permitted here.