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Phaser versus Leslie versus Univibe

Discussion in 'The Stomp Box' started by Matt G, Dec 8, 2014.

  1. Matt G

    Matt G Tele-Afflicted

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    Hello, folks

    I get the impression from YouTube soundclips that there is a fair amount of overlap between phaser / Leslie / Univibe effects pedals. (Granted, that may just be my lousy hearing or dodgy laptop speakers.) Anyway, I'd value informed opinions about whether one of these three types of pedal can cover for the other two in cases where you just want 'that' sort of sound in general, and don't have to perfectly recreate someone else's sound.

    Bonus points: if one of these types of pedal can stand in for the other two, is there a particular model that is especially versatile? I like keeping equipment to a dead minimum . . . but I also know that there's plenty of disagreement about whether Leslie or Univibe clones can even do their main job well, much less cover other sounds.

    OK, thanks in advance for your thoughts.

    Cheers

    Matt G
     
  2. bigben55

    bigben55 Friend of Leo's

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    I have an Option 5 Destination Phase. Its a phaser, but I use it as a faux Leslie sound, think SRV Cold Shot. It goes "faster" than most any phaser ive tried which IMO is why it works. Not dead on, but good enough for me. And I can use it as, well, a phaser. The Voodoo Labs Analog Chorus works too.
     
  3. Deckard

    Deckard Tele-Afflicted

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    I have one of the MXR univibe reissues (the one that looks like a cabin copy) and I find I can get some pretty phasery tones out of it. I also find out through some research that a lot of classic phaser tones were actually a univibe. I can also fake some tremolo styles with just the vibe switch on the univibe.

    If it were my board personally I'd go with a univibe and a Leslie sim as two different pedals and be much farther ahead of the guy attempting all three tones from one box.
     
  4. simonsp

    simonsp Friend of Leo's

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    I've been pondering this too and have considered the mxr uni-vibe. I went with a Script Phase 90 and a micro chorus. The mxr micro flanger gives vibish tones too but is slightly too bassy for my taste, nice sound though.

    The Moen Vibe is highly regarded but i've not been able to track one down so far to verify.
     
  5. mudbelly

    mudbelly Tele-Meister

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    I have the Boss leslie/univibe pedal on loan from a friend. I find the leslie gives a nice boost that I leave on most of the time. I am playing slide in a blues band with a lot of Allmans material. Sometimes I use the vibe if I need a trem sound for the rhythm parts. Nice pedal but if the guy who loan it to me wantts it back I doubt I would shell out that kind of bucks for another one.
     
  6. 1300 E Valencia

    1300 E Valencia Friend of Leo's

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    The UniVibe is a phaser, just a bad one. It was supposed to be a Leslie impersonator for organs, but it was, shall we say, less than successful with keyboard players. But it does have it's own unique sound, identifiable by the "wobble" as the pedal cycles through. It's rare to hear a contemporary demo that comes close to just putting on a Hendrix or Trower record.
    Phasers typically split a signal in at least two paths, then filter one or both by creating a series of peaks and troughs in the frequency spectrum. The position of the peaks and troughs is typically modulated so that they vary over time, creating a sweeping effect as different parts of the signal either reinforce or cancel each other when mixed back together.
    Chorus and flanging use an actual time delay on the split signal, then create the effect by mixing the signals together. Chorus uses a longer delay than flanging. Actual delay, like a Carbon Copy, is longer still.
    A Leslie, or rotary speaker, is probably closer to chorus or flanging than anything else, as the effect is created by an actual time delay, as the high-freqency horn and low-frequency rotor spin the sound away and toward the listener. Otherwise known as the Doppler Effect, some parts of the sound emanating from the Leslie gets to your ear earlier than other parts, so, again, some frequencies cancel while others are reinforced.
     
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  7. p8t8r

    p8t8r Tele-Meister

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    Your answer is actually inaccurate in some points. Unfortunately, I have no time to discuss them now.
     
  8. soulman969

    soulman969 Telefied Ad Free Member

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    I think you're talking about pedals that do distinctly different things. Some may look at them as being "kissin" cousins" but I don't. To me simple is better so a phase pedal works pretty well as a foundation and it can also be combined with a chorus, a vibrato or tremolo pedal to enhance it or provide a different type of effect.

    A Leslie pedal is just that. A one trick pony designed to reproduce the effect of a rotary speaker. Some do it quite well and others not so well but that's all it really does.

    A vibe pedal seems to have been someones idea of how to emulate a Leslie effect but IMHO it falls far short of that. It seems more like a combination phase and chorus pedal but more confined by it's controls and singularity.

    Opinions will vary and these are only mine.
     
  9. Mid Life Crisis

    Mid Life Crisis Poster Extraordinaire

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    I've got the Digitech Expression Factory pedal, which has both a Univibe and Leslie setting on it (although no phaser). Both of them sound really good.
     
  10. Ed Boyd

    Ed Boyd Tele-Afflicted

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    Phaser versus Leslie versus Univibe

    If you actually mean a Leslie then go with a chorus or univibe pedal. A Leslie cab is a waste for guitar. It is too subtle. A key factor in a Leslie's tone is the overtones and voicings you feed it. It is mostly lost on a 6-voice guitar. I think a cheap emulation like RT-20 or pedals like a Boss Chorus or an Uni-Vibe will get you way more mileage and sounds better.

    But if you have a crew, available trailer space and can make the room then what the hey. Also I think a single rotor sounds better with a guitar than a dual rotar.
     
  11. waparker4

    waparker4 Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    I think for guitar at least, having a fast and a slow speed are more important than whether you get there with a phaser, chorus, vibrato, univibe, or leslie sim. Ymmv. Especially live where people are listening to a whole mix. OR Maybe it's not that it doesn't matter, but it depends on your band's style and mix. A phaser works great for me. So does the TC Gravy although I wish I could switch between chorus and vibrato with a footswitch.
     
  12. KCStratMan

    KCStratMan Tele-Afflicted

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    Eventide ModFactor has excellent Rotary, Phaser, Flanger, Vibrato, two types of Tremolo, and four types of Chorus, plus several other special modulation effects. They have a factory "univibe" preset based on the Phaser, but similar effects can be created from Rotary. The speed (or any other parameter) can be swept with an expression pedal to simulate the speed control of a real Leslie cabinet or Univibe. Sound quality is already outstanding and ET is hinting at releasing a dedicated Univibe effect algorithm soon by popular demand which will upload to upgrade both ModFactor and H9 units.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    BTW, these are a couple good demos of real ex-Trower Shinei Univibe with speed controller. Playing Hendrix and Trower licks so very authentic demo.

     
  13. JD0x0

    JD0x0 Poster Extraordinaire

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    I have a true rotating speaker cabinet a Univibe and a Moog 12 stage phaser. They are very different animals IMO. The univibe was a 6 stage phaser meant to simulate a leslie, if I'm not mistaken.

    I disagree. I have a 1x10 rotating speaker cab, that I use with a 2x12. Even with the 2x12, the 1x10 adds a noticeable coloration to the sound and it's much more '3D' than any sort of Univibe or Phaser.
     
  14. Stone Garden

    Stone Garden TDPRI Member

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    Another vote for the Eventide Modfactor. I just picked one up used for $200 and I have found it to have excellent sound quality and versatility with many mod effects and intricate control of the effects. For comparison, I have a Strymon Lex leslie pedal which provides excellent leslie emulation. However, it makes the guitar sound a certain way (like a leslie does), while some of the other effects available on the Eventide like tremolo and vibrato don't really modify the tone of the guitar so much as they modulate the existing guitar tone.

    http://www.tdpri.com/telephoto/showphoto.php/photo/32348/cat/539
     
  15. Ed Boyd

    Ed Boyd Tele-Afflicted

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    I have 4 leslie cabs. I've ran guitar through the 122, the 3300 and the 860. Never the the HL-722 though. .... Ho-hum...yawn. Pretty much a waste of the cabinet. Guitar can't adequately feed the monster. :lol:

    PS - I meant to tease but probably came off as a wanker. The main issue with guitar is the rotors cuttoff at 800 hz. The Leslie heavy liftiing by design is done by the the bottom rotar and the guitar doesn't has enough ummmph!. All you get is upper rotor flutter which sounds neat recorded sometime but I think a standard dual rotor weenies out live. If you just have to have a Leslie then a 12" or 10" full range cabinet may be the best bet. I think pedals work better for guitars then run your guitar into real guitar amp built for a guitar's gain stage requirements.

    PPS I'm a Hammond Organist by trade. I'm OK on guitar and have done guitar gigs in some really good acts as a utility man but I'm not REALLY a guitarist.
     
  16. ICTRock

    ICTRock Tele-Afflicted

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    unless you're using a high end leslie sim pedal in stereo its going to sound really flat compared to a real leslie. also, real leslie cabs vary in configuration(speakers, speed, etc) and room configuration alters the sound. those are the little details sims can't quite nail but if you're that obsessed you'll pick one up.
    that said, I haven't played a phaser that gets a convincing leslie emulation. and while the univibe is technically a phaser it gets some sounds out of it that are in the ballpark of a leslie. not in the infield, maybe not even in the outfield, but in the ballpark.
     
  17. JD0x0

    JD0x0 Poster Extraordinaire

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    I dont have a true Leslie, but it is a real rotary speaker cab with a Weber 10'' Alnico. Pretty much the bass end of the Leslie with a guitar speaker, so no issues. It's also much more compact and light than the true Leslie cabs. It's about the size of a normal 1x10 cab.
     
  18. getbent

    getbent Telefied Silver Supporter

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    just buy the line6 m pedal... sheesh. then you have all of them in one box.

    it would be rare to need all three or two at the same time... the versions in that pedal (m5) are very good....

    this is not that hard.
     
  19. KCStratMan

    KCStratMan Tele-Afflicted

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    Some people like the sound of line6, some not so much. Chacun a son gout. I think the point is a purist wanting a particular single effect may want to invest 300-400 and be very happy, whereas the Eventide ModFactor is also an excellent value providing a dozen outstanding quality modulation effects around the same price.
    JDOxO do you have the Lil Rotary Wave? I've heard good things about them for the price, you pick your own 10" speaker and assemble as a kit? The Motion Sound SRV's sound very good but are a bit larger 12" or 2x12" and are a grand or more.
     
  20. Blaghard

    Blaghard TDPRI Member

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    I use a Digitech RP-80 on the rotary setting to much success. One advantage over a real Leslie or higher price simulators is that one can use the foot pedal to vary the speed of the effect. The most important part of the Leslie effect is when ramping the speed up or down and one has more control with the foot pedal than with a speed switch. Used pedals often come up for cheap. My EHX B9 sounds very convincing when using the RP-80. Adding an octave lower also enhances the tone.
     
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