Peter Frampton???

Cadillac_Mike

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As a Millennial, I guess I'm on the outside looking in... But one thing that has always sorta cracked me up and baffled me at the same time is.... "Frampton making a guitar sound like a synthesizer with a talk box; heck yeah, man! let's party! Whooooaaaaaa!!!"

EVH using an analog synth on "Jump".... "Man, what a sellout! It's like he doesn't care about the music anymore!"
 

Killing Floor

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Dreamy. Right?
1642221629758.png
 

Ed Driscoll

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As a Millennial, I guess I'm on the outside looking in... But one thing that has always sorta cracked me up and baffled me at the same time is.... "Frampton making a guitar sound like a synthesizer with a talk box; heck yeah, man! let's party! Whooooaaaaaa!!!"

EVH using an analog synth on "Jump".... "Man, what a sellout! It's like he doesn't care about the music anymore!"

You're not on the outside looking in, but you are playing the record backwards in a sense. (I remember at one point not fully getting Cream's accomplishments particularly in the studio, because I was listening to Led Zeppelin before them.) The talkbox was fun gimmick at the time, and Frampton and Joe Perry of Aerosmith really made it their own.

"Jump" threw me initially, because as I recall from back in the day, there were already a few synth-oriented songs out there already with tapping guitar solos on them; this comes readily to mind; its release date was several months before "Jump."



I think "Jump" became a hit because everything clicked: the novelty of VH using a synth, DLR's vocal performance, the sound and structure of the song, the fun video, and of course, the killer guitar solo.
 

Fearnot

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I knew Frampton from Humble Pie, but hadn't really followed his solo records at all... then 'that album' came out and suddenly, everyone and their stepmother was nuts about him. After a few months of saturation airplay, I broke down and bought 'that album.' I brought it home, sat down, listened to all four sides, put it back in the sleeve, and never listened to it again.

I learned that day that you don't need to buy those mega-platinum records... there's nothing there that the radio hasn't already played to death. Yawn.
 

Cadillac_Mike

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You're not on the outside looking in, but you are playing the record backwards in a sense. (I remember at one point not fully getting Cream's accomplishments particularly in the studio, because I was listening to Led Zeppelin before them.) The talkbox was fun gimmick at the time, and Frampton and Joe Perry of Aerosmith really made it their own.

"Jump" threw me initially, because as I recall from back in the day, there were already a few synth-oriented songs out there already with tapping guitar solos on them; this comes readily to mind; its release date was several months before "Jump."



I think "Jump" became a hit because everything clicked: the novelty of VH using a synth, DLR's vocal performance, the sound and structure of the song, the fun video, and of course, the killer guitar solo.


Sure, I just don't get the mentality of "A talk-box is figgin sweet man!" but synthesizers "like suck man!" To me it comes down to Frampton making a geetar sound like synth vs. the uncool method of keyboards in the studio...
 

Ed Driscoll

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Sure, I just don't get the mentality of "A talk-box is figgin sweet man!" but synthesizers "like suck man!" To me it comes down to Frampton making a geetar sound like synth vs. the uncool method of keyboards in the studio...
The talkbox is a great gimmick -- lead guitarists have always bragged about "making their guitars talk" -- by the mid-'70s there were guys literally talking through their solos on stage! Watch the live videos of Frampton or Joe Perry, and you'll see crowds wildly cheering and eating it all up.
 

Cadillac_Mike

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The talkbox is a great gimmick -- lead guitarists have always bragged about "making their guitars talk" -- by the mid-'70s there were guys literally talking through their solos on stage! Watch the live videos of Frampton or Joe Perry, and you'll see crowds wildly cheering and eating it all up.

Talking through solos on stage? Can you post an example?

unnamed.jpg
 

stantheman

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Saw PF at Boston Garden just before "Show Me The Way" hit the airwaves.
Within the first 5 measures everyone new it was going to be a colossal hit. He may have been opening for Clapton but honestly after his set whoever the headliner was, was instantly dispatched into obscurity so much so that I seriously cannot recall who it was.
 

loudboy

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Before it was a called a talk box that sat on the floor, it was called "the bag" and you wore it hanging from a strap over your shoulder, like a purse.
Made by Kustom.

KUSTOMS_THE_BAG_02.jpg

You're not on the outside looking in, but you are playing the record backwards in a sense. (I remember at one point not fully getting Cream's accomplishments particularly in the studio, because I was listening to Led Zeppelin before them.) The talkbox was fun gimmick at the time, and Frampton and Joe Perry of Aerosmith really made it their own.
Joe Walsh got there first with Rocky Mountain Way.
 

mrbdxmpl

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Umm, that's why it's called a talkbox:



(Scroll to the 15 minute mark for the solo.)

It's easy to make fun of Frampton during that period (Zappa sure did, and I love Frank) but the truth is I love every single thing about that video - he's got the chops, a tight and musical band, and honestly, with all those beautiful chicks out there, almost any one of which he could have taken backstage, I'd be a giddy, dopey mess too...

Also, he held their attention for 20+ minutes with a lot of instrumental passages - can you imagine some kid today paying attention to something for that long that wasn't about themselves?
 

runstendt

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For me (also a Millennial), the big thing with Frampton and the talk box was that it wasn't just a gimmick to him, but he managed to make it a central part of his musical identity; he was able to to use it as more than as effect. He also claims (in his autobiography) that he chose consciously to not overuse it, because it would lose its effectiveness. He also is an incredibly gifted musician, so it wasn't a case of a "gimmick" covering up a lack of talent.
 

Digital Larry

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I heard PF in high school when "Comes Alive" hit and a friend of mine then bought his other prior LPs. I thought he was a great player to be honest, but I never bought any of his LPs. When "I'm in You" came out I thought, "I really can't have this in my collection... people will get the wrong idea" based on his satin sexy come hither cover pose. I have more respect for him now having come full circle so to speak.
 




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