Pessimist. Optimist. Realist.

staxman

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I am an optimist. We all encounter negative situations and challenges in our lives, but how one reacts is the key. An optimist is confident he has the ability to meet the challenges or at least live to fight another day.
 

Alamo

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I guess I'll stick with the introverts

TS-_-OLI-SD5272-zoomed_540x.jpg
 

Lou Tencodpees

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I try to foresee different scenarios what may happen and all the problems we may encounter along the way. Of course also what to do if the problems arise.

I did that in my job, largely due to what I'd call incompetent management above. It was effective but found myself using worst case scenarios to strategize against. This kinda wired me to "awfulize" as my wife says, and the better part of a decade into retirement I'm still trying to deprogram myself.
 

Fretting out

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I’m a nihilist!

Except for destruction for destructions sake

Woe! I just saw @Nubs post

I’m not proud to admit I’m more of a pessimistic nihilist

Kind of ends up that way when EVERYTHING IS POINTLESS

i still try to enjoy things and keep to myself
 

bumnote

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I'm a pragmatic pessimist. Whatever we've planned for and the way we're going to execute it will fail in some small or large way.
Have a plan b.
Then start making plan c.
 

Greggorios

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I share my thoughts with my coworkers and superiors and they sometimes confuse this with being a pessimist. It is not pessimism, it is about being prepared.

Boy can I relate. At some point I began to understand that I was coming off somewhat negatively while, like yourself, I was only trying to analyze, prepare and set up contingencies. I found that I needed to "read" my audience a bit better, be selective in what I shared (holding back some of my concerns) and then verbalize those things I chose to share with more of a positive spin. It took some practice but it helped.
 

telemnemonics

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WRT the OP, I’m similar but it has nothing to do with optimism or pessimism.

I’d call it being a preparationist.
Not to be confused with a prepper, but same idea.
I just have no reason to believe in outcomes preppers prepare for, while I do believe common mistakes happen and supplies run out, staff gets sick, expectations are not met, building codes change, supply chains break down, all the stuff we’ve all seen several times and know about.

When I drive somewhere in my car, I bring a fifth wheel with a tire on it AKA spare. Who considers that, pessimism?
When I order lumber I buy extra.
When I run an extension cord for power tools I don’t put the cord where I might cut through it with a saw or trip over it.

I have seen folks get confused between being prepared and being fearful though.
Many people just don’t think things through, including fearful people.
 

telemnemonics

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Along the same lines.

Three program managers during the life of a program:

1. Snake Oil Salesman: Gets the program going by overstating performance while understating risks and cost. Moves on to bigger and better programs.

2. Poor SOB: Comes in and implements the changes needed to make the program viable. Gets rotated out before the changes can take effect.

3. White Knight: Takes over as the Poor SOB’s changes save the program and gets all the credit.

I’ve often found myself in your “poor SOB” category but liked it and it paid well.
Funny though, several times in different states for different employers, I’ve been one of a number of carpenters on a job then one by one they get canned and I’m left working by myself.

Same as in music, I like creating parts but I don’t really write great songs.
So designing projects I can do but I’m not strong in that area aside from detailing something a home owner waves and points at.
Snake oil sales might be realistic if the client has the extra 40% to cover the misinformed unrealistic claims that end up costing more.
I do like problem solving though and tend to not build stuff that needs to be changed later. I tell clients I will fix anything that goes wrong (after I leave) for free and they never call with bad news.
I end up white knight too though since I’m usually there until the end.

I found I prefer to work for myself because I’ve been told over and over I don’t make mistakes, which sounds ridiculous but clients and coworkers keep making that claim and it’s not far from the truth.
‘Cept of course in my own home of unfinished projects and misfit toys!

Maybe those identities are more white collar but they certainly apply to many scenarios including construction and engineering/ manufacturing.

As for attitude related to expecting success or failure?
I simply don’t use expectations as tools.
Training, skills, knowledge, tools & supplies, plus maybe asking a specialist for advice or help if my training skills and knowledge have gaps that fail to cover stuff in my path.

No way I’m just blundering forward on optimism if I don’t know for a fact that I can handle all possible hazards I may encounter.
Including filling in a client on possible unknown problems, generally related to the condition of their building that I can’t see until I rip it open.
Clients get real upset if you promise 6 weeks and $40k but it turns into 12 weeks and $80k!

Optimism for fun or a hobby, sure.
Not for money though.
Personally that’s what has worked for me.
 




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