Paul Dean's Partscaster

IMMusicRulz

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Paul Dean's main guitar during the early Loverboy days (not to mention Streetheart) started life as a 1964 Fender Stratocaster with a home-built neck that he completley rebuilt. The guitar featured many modifications/features that inspirte the later Odyssey and Hondo Paul Dean guitars. Paul mostly used Marshall and Hiwatt amps during his days in Loverboy--which created his whammy bar happy guitar sound.

  • Home Built Telecaster style neck with a break at the 10th fret (and lots of hollow spots in the neck) which gave it that unique resonance. This was later reproduced on the home-built prototypes + Odyssey and Hondo guitars by routing 1/4" resonance slots under the fingerboard parallel to each side of the Truss Rod.
  • Grover Machine Heads
  • Presumably an alder Fender Stratocaster body, chambered, tuned, and filled/reinforced with Fir or Pine, another element in the tone. Part of the body chambering is filled in with DAP Plastic Wood.
  • Pickups include 3 aftermarket single coils, possibly hotter than normal.
  • Gibson Stoptail tailpiece for a bridge
  • Metal backed, rubberized "Anti-Scratch" pickguard, which now is missing all the rubberized material from the front.
This was the guitar Paul used on almost all of Loverboy's hits including "Turn Me Loose", "The Kid Is Hot Tonight", and "Working for the Weekend", and he still uses it apparently in his home studio from the looks of a recent guitar lesson posted on Youtube called "Lesson for the Weekend" which provides MANY closeup shots of the guitar.

REFERENCES

GUITAR PLAYER - MARCH 1983 - PAUL DEAN LEAD LOVERBOY http://web.295.ca/~gtmadore/article 16.htm

This is the entire story of this guitar's construction.

How did you get interested in building?

I knew a guy who made a bass, and I guess that I got the idea from him. The first instrument I ever built was a 6-string bass I made in high school work shop. Then I had this old Les Paul--I think it was the '58 double cutaway with the little round horns. I picked it up for $125.00 because the neck was broken. Ifixed it and traded it to a guy for a '64 Strat, which I ended up totally smashing onstage trying to imitate Townshend.

What did you do to fix it?

I was really broke at the time, and even though I had another guitar--a custom one that I wasn't crazy about--I wanted the Strat back so I decided to fix it myself. I glued the neck back together--it broke at the 10th fret--using LePage's Bondfast and three drumsticks fro splints. I held the whole thing together with an elastic bandage. Believe it or not, it turned out great even though it was missing a few chunks of wood.

Why did it sound good?

Because the neck had been glued and filled in places with plastic wood, it had a particular resonance that was unbelievable. Shortly after that I left the guitar in a hot car trunk and the glue softened, which made the neck go for a total ****. Then I put on a new Tele neck, but it sounded worse than ever. I tried everything to make it better. I took the finish off and shaved it down. I even soaked it in a the bathtub and put it in the oven. I ended up making a new neck with a joint in the same spot as the original break.

Did you ever do anything else to the neck?

Yes, and I've never revealed this before. I put a couple of hollow grooves under the fingerboard to help the resonance--they weaken the structure and allow it to vibrate in a certain way. Actually there are three grooves; one for the truss rod and two resonance slots.

What happened to that body?

I had to reinforce it because it was totally wrecked; I used either fir or pine. Then I mounted a different bridge in the wrong place, so I had to fill in the holes and start over. Finally I got the whole thing back together, but it still sounded awful, it had a great sustain, but no real tone. So I took a screwdriver and hammer and chiseled out a bunch of wood underneath the pickguard. But I carved away too much so I filled up the cavity with plastic wood--it turned out to be right on. That guitar had a totally unique sound. I used some of those ideas on my Paul Dean guitar, including the neck slots, the body cavity under the pickguard, and a three-piece hard rock maple neck that resonates like the one I patched together.

RECENT PAUL DEAN INTERVIEW MENTIONING THE STRAT - Rocky Mountain Entertainer http://www.rmemag.com/pauldeanInterview.htm

RME/LFC - Jane: Do you have a favorite guitar, one you prefer over others?

PD - Yes. I just got this new Les Paul. It's my favorite 'live' guitar. You'll see it in the video. It's the one in the hotel room. It is a pretty interesting guitar. It's called a Les Paul Axcess. I think it's Alex Lifeson - the guitar player from Rush - I believe it's the one that he's endorsing. I changed the nobs, picks ups, the things that hold the strap on, the tuning heads, the nuts where the strings go through - basically everything except for the wood and the paint.

Now there's another guitar that's my favorite. REALLY MY FAVORITE GUITAR. You'll see it on the "No Tomorrow" video. It's the guitar I played "Working For The Weekend", "Turn Me Loose", and "Jump" on AND the whole first two Loverboy albums, plus the album I recorded with Streeheart as well. It's the one I built in Edmonton in 1973.

The Partscaster can also be seen in the following videos:





Even if you don't like Loverboy, I still think Paul Dean was a good guitarist, and his guitar playing was a good compliment to Mike Reno or whatever his name was. These guys are forever considered classic rock, and if you hear a Loverboy song on your local radio station, you can thank me later.
 

widefault

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Dec 12, 2009
Posts
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Location
Green Bay, WI
He also had a Hondo signature model. Really

 

Deeve

Doctor of Teleocity
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Dec 7, 2009
Posts
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Ballard
"Resonance slots", routed in parallel to the truss-rod routing?
I'm shaking my head, wondering if this is reptile lubricant, or a blind-spot missed by @preeb , @Ronkirn , @Freeman Keller , or other builders here (and the rest of the world's commercial manufacturers) .

That said, the tutorial video was a joy to watch. Thanks for posting it.
Peace - Deeve
 

Ronkirn

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Joined
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Jacksonville, FL
the dolts that think guitar tone orbits "resonance" deserve the life of angst they make for themselves as they quest for the impossible dream. It's was probably predicated by their constantly dozing off in "elementary Physics" as the Prof cited Newtonian laws.

ANYTHING the guitar does is "powered" by the vibrations emanating from the string. The #1 "thing" it must do is to cause the pickup to produce a signal.. The more energy the string has, the more output will be generated as well as the longer the signal will be generated at a level that the amp can use to make sound. The #1 thing that sux the energy is when the string is making something resonate...

That does not mean Zero resonance = Maximum tone ... Nope.. a guitar is a study in compromises and the resonance MUST be balanced with a litany of other factors to achieve the maximum of everything once she's ready to rock.. Just simply eliminating weight in a quest for improved tone is just plain wrong.

Guys seem to think a lightweight resonant body is the ultimate key to tone... WRONG... it's the ultimate key to a lightweight resonant body.. And, . . . it's probably the key to many of the sonic issues a poorly designed guitar can manifest.
 

Deeve

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Joined
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Posts
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Location
Ballard
the dolts that think guitar tone orbits "resonance" deserve the life of angst they make for themselves as they quest for the impossible dream. It's was probably predicated by their constantly dozing off in "elementary Physics" as the Prof cited Newtonian laws.

ANYTHING the guitar does is "powered" by the vibrations emanating from the string. The #1 "thing" it must do is to cause the pickup to produce a signal.. The more energy the string has, the more output will be generated as well as the longer the signal will be generated at a level that the amp can use to make sound. The #1 thing that sux the energy is when the string is making something resonate...

That does not mean Zero resonance = Maximum tone ... Nope.. a guitar is a study in compromises and the resonance MUST be balanced with a litany of other factors to achieve the maximum of everything once she's ready to rock.. Just simply eliminating weight in a quest for improved tone is just plain wrong.

Guys seem to think a lightweight resonant body is the ultimate key to tone... WRONG... it's the ultimate key to a lightweight resonant body.. And, . . . it's probably the key to many of the sonic issues a poorly designed guitar can manifest.
Thx, Professor Kirn!
I figured we'd get a voice of reason, if I tagged enough experienced builders

Peace - Deeve
 

BB

Poster Extraordinaire
Joined
May 17, 2003
Posts
6,460
Location
Great Pacific NW
I was never a fan of Loverboy, but when I was in a top 40/new wave band in the early to mid 80's, Turn Me Loose and Working For The Weekend were sure dance floor fillers.

People LOVED Loverboy! So, I had to just smile and rock as I played the night away doing 40-50% of songs I would never, ever believe I would ever be playing.
 

Giuseppenola

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New Orleans LA
the dolts that think guitar tone orbits "resonance" deserve the life of angst they make for themselves as they quest for the impossible dream. It's was probably predicated by their constantly dozing off in "elementary Physics" as the Prof cited Newtonian laws.

ANYTHING the guitar does is "powered" by the vibrations emanating from the string. The #1 "thing" it must do is to cause the pickup to produce a signal.. The more energy the string has, the more output will be generated as well as the longer the signal will be generated at a level that the amp can use to make sound. The #1 thing that sux the energy is when the string is making something resonate...

That does not mean Zero resonance = Maximum tone ... Nope.. a guitar is a study in compromises and the resonance MUST be balanced with a litany of other factors to achieve the maximum of everything once she's ready to rock.. Just simply eliminating weight in a quest for improved tone is just plain wrong.

Guys seem to think a lightweight resonant body is the ultimate key to tone... WRONG... it's the ultimate key to a lightweight resonant body.. And, . . . it's probably the key to many of the sonic issues a poorly designed guitar can manifest.
I like your point: “it’s the ultimate key to a lightweight resonant body.” “Tone” is subjective.

I’m one of the “dolts” who was built electric and acoustic archtops with an eye towards weight/resonance/decay/fundamental tone versus overtones. Dozens of guitars. Good guitars.

I learned these guitars sound “different”. I have some heavy, hard hitting guitars. I have some lightweights. They all have carefully chosen pickups, mostly single coil, mostly Alnico II and III. If I need “cut”, I have Alnico V pickups in a northern ash body. I prefer the lighter guitars for day to day solo finger style playing in several styles, because, well, they’re lighter, they sound “lighter”, and it suits the technique. Also, I have 2 top loaders…they also suit the fingerstyle technique, as well as my arthritic fingers.

One more thought. 3 of these guitars also feature Gibson scale necks. Again, it’s a nod to arthritic joints that have always done physical work. I learned that they sound and feel “different”. I also learned an appreciation for the 25.5” scale…chords above fret 12 are voiced clearer, by me, anyway.

It’s possible that “you’re not supposed to play up that high” anyway.
 

blowtorch

Telefied
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May 2, 2003
Posts
39,821
Location
Wisco
"The kid is hot tonight, but where will he be tomorrow?"

It's always so ironic when bands write songs like that and it ends up being prophetic
Like this one (BCRs ROCKS, BTW) :
 

Fretting out

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Paul Dean's main guitar during the early Loverboy days (not to mention Streetheart) started life as a 1964 Fender Stratocaster with a home-built neck that he completley rebuilt. The guitar featured many modifications/features that inspirte the later Odyssey and Hondo Paul Dean guitars. Paul mostly used Marshall and Hiwatt amps during his days in Loverboy--which created his whammy bar happy guitar sound.

  • Home Built Telecaster style neck with a break at the 10th fret (and lots of hollow spots in the neck) which gave it that unique resonance. This was later reproduced on the home-built prototypes + Odyssey and Hondo guitars by routing 1/4" resonance slots under the fingerboard parallel to each side of the Truss Rod.
  • Grover Machine Heads
  • Presumably an alder Fender Stratocaster body, chambered, tuned, and filled/reinforced with Fir or Pine, another element in the tone. Part of the body chambering is filled in with DAP Plastic Wood.
  • Pickups include 3 aftermarket single coils, possibly hotter than normal.
  • Gibson Stoptail tailpiece for a bridge
  • Metal backed, rubberized "Anti-Scratch" pickguard, which now is missing all the rubberized material from the front.
This was the guitar Paul used on almost all of Loverboy's hits including "Turn Me Loose", "The Kid Is Hot Tonight", and "Working for the Weekend", and he still uses it apparently in his home studio from the looks of a recent guitar lesson posted on Youtube called "Lesson for the Weekend" which provides MANY closeup shots of the guitar.

REFERENCES

GUITAR PLAYER - MARCH 1983 - PAUL DEAN LEAD LOVERBOY http://web.295.ca/~gtmadore/article 16.htm

This is the entire story of this guitar's construction.

How did you get interested in building?

I knew a guy who made a bass, and I guess that I got the idea from him. The first instrument I ever built was a 6-string bass I made in high school work shop. Then I had this old Les Paul--I think it was the '58 double cutaway with the little round horns. I picked it up for $125.00 because the neck was broken. Ifixed it and traded it to a guy for a '64 Strat, which I ended up totally smashing onstage trying to imitate Townshend.

What did you do to fix it?

I was really broke at the time, and even though I had another guitar--a custom one that I wasn't crazy about--I wanted the Strat back so I decided to fix it myself. I glued the neck back together--it broke at the 10th fret--using LePage's Bondfast and three drumsticks fro splints. I held the whole thing together with an elastic bandage. Believe it or not, it turned out great even though it was missing a few chunks of wood.

Why did it sound good?

Because the neck had been glued and filled in places with plastic wood, it had a particular resonance that was unbelievable. Shortly after that I left the guitar in a hot car trunk and the glue softened, which made the neck go for a total ****. Then I put on a new Tele neck, but it sounded worse than ever. I tried everything to make it better. I took the finish off and shaved it down. I even soaked it in a the bathtub and put it in the oven. I ended up making a new neck with a joint in the same spot as the original break.

Did you ever do anything else to the neck?

Yes, and I've never revealed this before. I put a couple of hollow grooves under the fingerboard to help the resonance--they weaken the structure and allow it to vibrate in a certain way. Actually there are three grooves; one for the truss rod and two resonance slots.

What happened to that body?

I had to reinforce it because it was totally wrecked; I used either fir or pine. Then I mounted a different bridge in the wrong place, so I had to fill in the holes and start over. Finally I got the whole thing back together, but it still sounded awful, it had a great sustain, but no real tone. So I took a screwdriver and hammer and chiseled out a bunch of wood underneath the pickguard. But I carved away too much so I filled up the cavity with plastic wood--it turned out to be right on. That guitar had a totally unique sound. I used some of those ideas on my Paul Dean guitar, including the neck slots, the body cavity under the pickguard, and a three-piece hard rock maple neck that resonates like the one I patched together.

RECENT PAUL DEAN INTERVIEW MENTIONING THE STRAT - Rocky Mountain Entertainer http://www.rmemag.com/pauldeanInterview.htm

RME/LFC - Jane: Do you have a favorite guitar, one you prefer over others?

PD - Yes. I just got this new Les Paul. It's my favorite 'live' guitar. You'll see it in the video. It's the one in the hotel room. It is a pretty interesting guitar. It's called a Les Paul Axcess. I think it's Alex Lifeson - the guitar player from Rush - I believe it's the one that he's endorsing. I changed the nobs, picks ups, the things that hold the strap on, the tuning heads, the nuts where the strings go through - basically everything except for the wood and the paint.

Now there's another guitar that's my favorite. REALLY MY FAVORITE GUITAR. You'll see it on the "No Tomorrow" video. It's the guitar I played "Working For The Weekend", "Turn Me Loose", and "Jump" on AND the whole first two Loverboy albums, plus the album I recorded with Streeheart as well. It's the one I built in Edmonton in 1973.

The Partscaster can also be seen in the following videos:





Even if you don't like Loverboy, I still think Paul Dean was a good guitarist, and his guitar playing was a good compliment to Mike Reno or whatever his name was. These guys are forever considered classic rock, and if you hear a Loverboy song on your local radio station, you can thank me later.

Ever listen to any knight ranger or “speak of the devil”/live Ozzy album from the 80’s with brad Gillis on guitar?

If you like these type of guitars you should look into Brad Gillis’s strat, started life as a 62 stripped and in parts in a box and ended up tricked out, there’s a couple videos on YouTube where he talks about it
89C7224E-44A4-47A6-AAC2-D32E5FA33881.jpeg
It has built in wireless with the antenna routed into the back, also has one of the first Floyd roses on it
5FBEC8DB-367D-4A70-83E8-EE2F998C2DBC.jpeg


Or a pretty famous one is Steve morse’s Frankenstein tele
9B61BC71-24C4-40B3-984B-E458BFF3CFC1.jpeg


Not to take away from the original post
 

Blackmore Fan

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Nov 22, 2013
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Ever listen to any knight ranger or “speak of the devil”/live Ozzy album from the 80’s with brad Gillis on guitar?

If you like these type of guitars you should look into Brad Gillis’s strat, started life as a 62 stripped and in parts in a box and ended up tricked out, there’s a couple videos on YouTube where he talks about it
View attachment 1015196
It has built in wireless with the antenna routed into the back, also has one of the first Floyd roses on it
View attachment 1015195

I've seen Brad Gillis with Night Ranger twice--he's an amazing guitarist! He's very fluid still!
 




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