Paul Butterfield Blues Band

Discussion in 'Music to Your Ears' started by ping-ping-clicka, Sep 26, 2020.

  1. ping-ping-clicka

    ping-ping-clicka Friend of Leo's Ad Free Member

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    zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz tele.jpg
     
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  2. Digital Larry

    Digital Larry Friend of Leo's Gold Supporter

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    East/West was a foundational part of my youth and, along with John Mayall and the Allman Brothers, formed my nascent thoughts as to what "the blues" was. Imagine my dismay when I met some guys in my early 20s to play with who were totally into the "real" blues/R&B stuff, namely almost exclusively black artists from the 50s and 60s. I came around eventually but they simply scoffed at any suggestion we might cover one of these artists.

    The first BBB album was one of my first CD purchases and for whatever reason I don't think I ever listened to it more than a few times.
     
    Last edited: Sep 26, 2020
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  3. old wrench

    old wrench Tele-Afflicted

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    As a matter of fact, East/West is in my CD player down in my my shop right now! :)

    Along with Blues Breakers - John Mayall and Eric Clapton.

    I like Clapton's early stuff the best. He's always had his licks down, and his early stuff seems to reflect an intensity and passion that sort of smoothed out and went away in later years.


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  4. DOC DYA

    DOC DYA Tele-Meister

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    Probably the BEST blues band in the late 60's. John Mayall, Clapton, Green and some other brit' folks were good, but not THAT GOOD... Butter, Bloomfield, Bishop, Naftalin were good because they sucked Chicago South Side's milk... and they didn't stay there... Listen to East West, and start from here.
     
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  5. DOC DYA

    DOC DYA Tele-Meister

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    I should add that Jerome Arnold worked with Howlin' Wolf, Sam Lay and Billy Davenport with all the big shots! A lot of people don't mention them when they praise the PBBB, but they were essential to the music !
     
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  6. tubegeek

    tubegeek Friend of Leo's

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    Highly recommended documentary: "Horn From The Heart/The Paul Butterfield Story."

    Butterfield & Bloomfield came up from the real deal Chicago south side scene, acolytes of Howlin' Wolf and Muddy Waters to name two. And indeed Sam Lay jumped ship to become the BBB drummer.
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  7. cravenmonket

    cravenmonket Tele-Holic

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    Yep. No substitute for sitting at the feet of giants.
     
  8. jrblue

    jrblue Friend of Leo's

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    There's a great documentary on Butterfield. Sorry I don't recall the name. It makes no difference what everyday wannabe's theorize about who is legit and who is not. Butterfield was liked, admired, and accepted by the greats because he was a great blues musician. Being white makes him a curiosity since it's not typical, but the guy lived a blues life from early on. Personally, I have no idea who some people have to bring their mental filters and categorizations to something this simple. I saw him and the band around "Pigboy Crabshaw" time, and it was a total revelation. Black and white guys together in the tightest band you could imagine... that was something, too.
     
  9. Shango66

    Shango66 Friend of Leo's

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    “Born in Chicago” is such a strong opening statement.
     
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  10. suave eddie

    suave eddie Tele-Afflicted

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    I pretty much wore out those two albums back in the day.
     
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  11. stratoman1

    stratoman1 Friend of Leo's

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    I saw one on either Prime or Tubi. Wherever it was it was pretty interesting
     
  12. ping-ping-clicka

    ping-ping-clicka Friend of Leo's Ad Free Member

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    well, black white christian, jewish, suburban middle class, urban city dwellers, are just ways of playing games when thinking about a music that has risen from the textured American disaperia. when John Hammond Jr. Blew my mind when I first heard him playing and singing " WHO DO YOU LOVE" with members of the Band recording with him I did not quest his socio-economic background , who he was related to. What I experience was the power and feeling of the music coming of the load speakers hooked up to the jukebox Nothing else captured my attention but the raw power of the performance, the same way the "Ode to Joy" sends electricity surging through my body.
    I don't question the nationality race or lifestyle of the composer , I'm swept away with the emotions that I feel when I experience the symphony uplifting my spirit. I do not think about what a manipulative creep Wagner was in life I am carried away by the majesty of his music.


     
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  13. Mike M

    Mike M Tele-Meister

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    One of the greatest bands of all time, especially during the Bloomfield 65-66 period.

    What's interesting to me, is among 60's blues/rock guitar heroes, Bloomfield was one of the few to not use or master distortion as the decade progressed. He always played loud, but mostly clean.
     
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  14. Chiogtr4x

    Chiogtr4x Poster Extraordinaire

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    I have a 2-disc Elektra Anthology of The Butterfield Band ( listened to #2 today, on a long drive to a regular duo gig)

    Disc 2 does not even have Bloomfield on it ( Elvin Bishop and other guitars, yes) and it still rocks!
    Great players, other singers, and tight arrangements!
     
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  15. Teleguy61

    Teleguy61 Friend of Leo's

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    Hugely important records and band in my musical life.
     
  16. smoothrecluse

    smoothrecluse Tele-Meister Silver Supporter

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    Such an iconic, foundational band. My favorite song is “One More Heartache.”

     
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  17. SnidelyWhiplash

    SnidelyWhiplash Friend of Leo's

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    As much I love Bloomfield, he was by no means the be all & end all as far as guitar was concerned in the PBBB.
     
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  18. ping-ping-clicka

    ping-ping-clicka Friend of Leo's Ad Free Member

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    Bloomfield got all the glory but I think imho that Elvin Bishop is a great player, and that Butters chops on harp easily matched Bloomfields guitar skills and largely were overshadowed by Bloomfields popularity , this is not to say one was better than the other, they both had something laudable to say with their refined talents.
     
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  19. Chiogtr4x

    Chiogtr4x Poster Extraordinaire

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    This has been my opinion for many years, too.

    Funny how in the 1970's, I ( being a huge fan of all things Country/Sothern rock, whatever you call it) and had a few Elvin Bishop albums ( pre- Mickey Thomas) and loved him.

    AND, as a kid, earlier in the '60's I knew listened to my older sister's Butterfield and Electric Flag albums, and loved those. Al Kopper too...

    But never knew Elvin Bishop was in the Butter band(- before Bloomfield even joined) till the 1990's!
     
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  20. Matt Sarad

    Matt Sarad Tele-Holic

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    My introduction to the blues when I was 11 or 12. My brother is 8 years older. He had it on vinyl. Followed up with first Taj Mahal where I learned how to play Statesboro Blues with a Corocidin bottle I still have 2 years before I heard the Allman Bros.
     
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