1. Win a Broadcaster or one of 3 Teles! The annual Supporting Member Giveaway is on. To enter Click Here. To see all the prizes and full details Click Here. To view the thread about the giveaway Click Here.

Pau Ferro Finish Overspray?

Discussion in 'Finely Finished' started by DAKnox, Feb 19, 2021.

  1. DAKnox

    DAKnox Tele-Meister

    Posts:
    381
    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2014
    Location:
    Scotland
    I took a Vintera 60s Strat in a trade. I was never keen on how light pau ferro was. But this is actually looked an OK piece.

    Except....the first fret and a half....its very light.

    I decided to try and darken the fretboard with Montys relic wax. This led to a discovery.

    The first fret and a half is not only really light. But also feels like a finished maple board. It is totally smooth and shiny. You can't feel any grain whatsoever. It feels nothing like the rest of the neck.

    Could pau ferro have a part of wood that feels like this? Or could it be finish overspray?

    One theory i had is that fender dyes the boards and this bit is light because finish overspray has not allowed the dye to penetrate.

    Even when I put lemon oil on it, the rest of the neck soaks it up a bit but this part it will just sit.

    I've started to sand it a little bit with microfiber paper. Thinking if it's finish I can get through to wood.

    But if this is just a quirk of the wood I don't want to keep going as ill just keep sanding through wood.

    Totally feels like finish though. 20210219_115851.jpg 20210219_115838.jpg
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Feb 19, 2021
    Fendereedo likes this.
  2. Sea Devil

    Sea Devil Friend of Leo's

    Age:
    58
    Posts:
    2,245
    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2006
    Location:
    Brooklyn, NY
    No one can really offer an opinion on this. You're the only one in a position to figure it out.

    I'd use a single-edged razor blade if I were you. It's more controllable than sandpaper. A utility knife blade is almost as good, but it's less flexible and harder to use with a feather-light touch, which is what you want. As long as whatever you're scraping off is clear, it's not wood.
     
    RodeoTex and DAKnox like this.
  3. hemingway

    hemingway Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    7,686
    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2012
    Location:
    London, UK
    I once used tru oil on a piece of rosewood veneer that I shaped into a rear cavity cover.

    About half of the RW shone up beautifully after a couple of coats, while the other half just kept soaking up coat after coat and stayed dull and matte.

    Not that you can really tell from this picture . . . because over time it has been polished up my my manly six-pack.

    But wood varies. I have RW necks that you could use as rasps and others that are smooth as Sinatra.

    20210219_150857.jpg
     
    RobRiggs and DAKnox like this.
  4. Fendereedo

    Fendereedo Poster Extraordinaire

    Age:
    55
    Posts:
    6,132
    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2014
    Location:
    Land of squeak & honey!
    I had a little bit like that on my Jazzmaster fretboard. I shouldn't recommend this, but I lightly, and I do mean lightly sanded between the frets. It removed what I thought was gloss, and then I was able to use fret doctor on it. Please, please be careful though, you don't want to take the level down too far. Hope this helps you.
     
    RobRiggs and DAKnox like this.
  5. telepraise

    telepraise Tele-Afflicted

    Age:
    65
    Posts:
    1,334
    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2017
    Location:
    Tampa Bay
    That doesn't really look like a "quirk of the wood" to me. Judging by how much finish is on that peghead, overspray wouldn't to surprising. I would scrape, then sand. I got a strat with a Pau Ferro neck a while back. The FB was very dry and scratchy. I sanded between the frets with 600 grit before oiling it. It came up smooth as glass, much smoother than rosewood, almost like ebony.
     
    DAKnox and Fendereedo like this.
  6. schmee

    schmee Doctor of Teleocity

    Posts:
    13,953
    Joined:
    Jun 2, 2003
    Location:
    northwest
    Pau Ferro should be soapy feeling. It's not?
     
    DAKnox likes this.
  7. Personal Gsus

    Personal Gsus TDPRI Member

    Age:
    47
    Posts:
    25
    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2021
    Location:
    Atlanta
    Honestly, I wouldn't worry too much about it. Pau ferro has its own characteristics that are different from rosewood. Before rosewood was banned, pau ferro was marketed as a premium alternative. Enjoy it for what is is – and don't try to make it look like something it's not.

    As for the potential for overspray, it's hard for any of us to tell without holding it. But from your pics that doesn't seem to be the case. At least, not enough to have a meaningful impact.

    I would definitely NOT be trying to sand it.

    It could be that your particular slab is just harder and lighter in that spot. I have this exact guitar, and mine is much lighter on the bass side, all the way down the neck. See pic -

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Feb 19, 2021
  8. stratisfied

    stratisfied Tele-Holic

    Age:
    68
    Posts:
    673
    Joined:
    Dec 17, 2019
    Location:
    Midwest
    I would leave it alone.

    You might be able to scuff it lightly with a Scotchbrite and then selectively darken the areas with a penetrating stain applied with a Qtip and blended with your fingertip into the darker part of the Fretboard. It runs through your dot marker though, so you would want to be careful.

    You might even get away with just blending it with an inexpensive stain pen after cleaning the fretboard. You apply the stain with the pen and use your fingertip to "swipe" along the edge to blend it with the adjacent area. If you don't like the result, you just wipe it off with Mineral Spirits and try again. It takes a bit of practice to get it right.
     
  9. Sea Devil

    Sea Devil Friend of Leo's

    Age:
    58
    Posts:
    2,245
    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2006
    Location:
    Brooklyn, NY
    The stain will work if it's just in the wood and not overspray.

    The razor blade approach will tell you right away. If make one light pass, you'll know.
     
  10. DAKnox

    DAKnox Tele-Meister

    Posts:
    381
    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2014
    Location:
    Scotland
    No, this part is much smoother.

    Well, I thought someone who was very familiar with Pau Ferro could tell me if it has very light light and waxy/shiny areas naturally.

    So, I'm sure this was finish overspray now. I lightly sanded with 1500 micromesh paper. The "powder" coming off was initially white and did turn brown. I've got a little bit to do, I've not got up tight to the nut.

    I tried to be super careful to stop when I got to wood. Anything I removed was a tiny amount of powder. So I hope this will be OK? Anything that's come off will be barely a tiny fraction of a mm so not like I have scalloped the board.

    Tried to show what's left of the overspray here:-

    152798846_336153174401109_4437242497017778671_n.jpg

    Overall it does look much better now.

    152800879_4368157096532814_2344899114317502977_n.jpg

    I do find it interesting that the wood is so much lighter where the overspray is, cant be coincidence.
     
  11. Sea Devil

    Sea Devil Friend of Leo's

    Age:
    58
    Posts:
    2,245
    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2006
    Location:
    Brooklyn, NY
    Of course it isn't coincidence. The wax you used to darken the rest didn't reach that part. At this point, maybe you should try the wax again. It might gently wick under what little poly remains and help it to lift off with minimal friction. It might take a couple passes with some playing time on-between. Slow and easy.

    See those tiny lines parallel to the nut? Those can be eliminated with the delicate use of a razor blade. I mean zero pressure. You can also use the razor blade to reduce the contrast where it's most extreme. Just rub the fretboard with your fingers every few passes to see how it's going. You might even want to lick your fingers first if that doesn't gross you out.
     
    Last edited: Feb 22, 2021
  12. Fendereedo

    Fendereedo Poster Extraordinaire

    Age:
    55
    Posts:
    6,132
    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2014
    Location:
    Land of squeak & honey!
    Glad it's come off. Some lemon oil, or fret doctor will do the rest, take some of the lightness out of the area. I forgot to mention I've started to use Fender fretboard remedy, and I've had good results with it so far. It's cheaper than fret doctor and darkens the board much better.
     
    DAKnox likes this.
  13. DAKnox

    DAKnox Tele-Meister

    Posts:
    381
    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2014
    Location:
    Scotland
    No, the light patch was there before I applied the wax. This is why I'm wondering if the overspray and light colour are connected.

    Thanks for the advice though, I've sanded down those bits a bit more now and then applied more wax.

    It looks much better. I will maybe do some more gentle work next string change and work away at the rest of it gradually. How it looks now.... 20210222_214058.jpg
     
    Nelg and Fendereedo like this.
  14. Sea Devil

    Sea Devil Friend of Leo's

    Age:
    58
    Posts:
    2,245
    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2006
    Location:
    Brooklyn, NY
    What I meant is that the wax didn't reach the wood because the overspray acted as a barrier, not that you didn't put the wax there. It's coming along nicely!
     
  15. stratisfied

    stratisfied Tele-Holic

    Age:
    68
    Posts:
    673
    Joined:
    Dec 17, 2019
    Location:
    Midwest
    It's not overspray, it's the natural variation in the color of the wood. Look at the end of the fretboard above the nut. The light color goes completely through the slab.
     
IMPORTANT: Treat everyone here with respect, no matter how difficult!
No sex, drug, political, religion or hate discussion permitted here.