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Partscaster tele - to grainfill or not to grainfill…

Discussion in 'Finely Finished' started by rooboo, Mar 19, 2018.

  1. rooboo

    rooboo Tele-Meister

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    I'm working on a partscaster tele. I've got a swampash body and I'm really not keen on grainfilling it. But all I can read about swampash, everybody say's you gotta grainfill.

    But is that just becase otherwise I won't get that mirror finish? I don't really like the mirror finish. I like guitars to feel woody.

    But I have never painted a guitar before. I'm going dakota red and I'm going spray can nitro.

    Have any of you experienced fellas any advice?
    The bottom line: I wan't it red, but I don't want it mirrory. I don't mind grain comming through.
    Do I still have to grainfill? If yes, why?
     
  2. hemingway

    hemingway Poster Extraordinaire

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    You don't have to do anything you don't want to - if you like grain and don't want a glass finish I wouldn't grain fill.
     
  3. rooboo

    rooboo Tele-Meister

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    Thanks! Of course I don't have to :)

    I thought more on the likes of "I have tried this and it did not work at all because…".
     
  4. Bones

    Bones Telefied Ad Free Member

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    I did not grain fill this.

    4.jpg 2.jpg 1.jpg

    Now that the Tru-oil has had more time to fully cure, it has settled into the low spots more and you can see the the difference in the high and low spots, I like it.
     
  5. rooboo

    rooboo Tele-Meister

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    Looks bloody awesome! If I even come close to that, but see through red, I'm a happy camper!
    Thanks!
     
  6. hemingway

    hemingway Poster Extraordinaire

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    I think it will be pretty much as you said - if you don't grain fill, and if you don't pile on the paint, some grain might show through if it's a particularly textured body. Which I think would look pretty good - but it's all down to personal preference. I don't think there's any technical reason you have to grain fill.

    The only guitar I ever painted was alder and there was absolutely no grain showing through on that; so it was never an issue. I didn't grain fill and it was fine.
     
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  7. Bones

    Bones Telefied Ad Free Member

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  8. rooboo

    rooboo Tele-Meister

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    Good thread, thanks. But that's dye though. I'm gonna spray paint it. I've found a good brand of nitro spray who have Dakota Red. So I'm planning on maybe four coats of Dakota Red and then maybe three coats of clear nitro on top. That'll hopefully do it.
     
  9. dkmw

    dkmw Poster Extraordinaire

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    A minimal grain fill will save you money, as you're going to need multiple rattle cans.

    IOW, grain fill is cheaper than lacquer, and the ash is going to "drink" the first few coats of lacquer if un-filled.

    You can still get the sunk into the grain look with one shot of filler on there.
     
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  10. mherrcat

    mherrcat Tele-Holic

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    If Dakota Red is an opaque color, and I think it is, I wouldn't think having grain lines in it would look so good. If the finish is transparent/translucent then seeing some grain lines in the surface of the finish wouldn't be so bad. I have a Tele that shows some grain lines in the surface of a translucent finish and it looks fine to me. If you use grain filler only, then final finish, you might still get a little grain in the final finish. Grain filler, sanding sealer, then final finish is the best way to get no grain lines.
     
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  11. lammie200

    lammie200 Friend of Leo's

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    If you do grain filler and want to spray over with red you should be cautious about how you grain fill the end grain. It will soak up the grain filler color much more so than the flat grain. From what you have said it seems like you want open grain texture but with an opaque finish. Grain filler, whether colored or not, will not give you that result.
     
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  12. rooboo

    rooboo Tele-Meister

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    The brand of color I found is translucent dakota red. To get it opaque I have to use white basecoat/primer. But I don't want the opaque look I'm going for translucent. I thought about staining it at first and just use a clear coat on top, but have not found a good brand that ships to Sweden.
     
  13. rogb

    rogb Tele-Afflicted

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    You could give it plenty of coats of sanding sealer, paying attention to the end grain, as stated before.
    I think if you don't do something to prep the surface, your lovely translucent red is gonna sink right into the ash, leaving a patchy finish that is not woody or as beautiful as you imagined it would be.

    With a dark colour like red, getting an even see-thru coat is gonna take some practice with rattle cans. It is hard with BSB so I can imagine red to be even more tricky mate:)

    My second attempt at BSB, the first had to be stripped completely, wasting $50 of rattlecan nitro lol ( I wasn't lolling then...) tele1.jpg
     
    Last edited: Mar 20, 2018
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  14. ndcaster

    ndcaster Poster Extraordinaire

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    I finished an ash body in tung oil many years ago with no grain filler.

    Over the years, the grain got filled in somewhat, in places, with sweat and dirt.

    I like it, but that's where you're headed.

    C3D50C57-B7A9-4983-ACBA-014FA65585A5.jpeg
     
    Last edited: Mar 20, 2018
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  15. perttime

    perttime Tele-Afflicted

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    Some like to accentuate the grain either before translucent finish or after an opaque one.
     
  16. Finck

    Finck Tele-Afflicted

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    Look below the Fender Rustic Ash Tele, that's probably close to what you will get without fill the grain. Note the texture, not the color:

    [​IMG]

    Personally, I like the "old pirate ship" visual of this one, a partscaster made by a Brazilian guy:

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Mar 20, 2018
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  17. rooboo

    rooboo Tele-Meister

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    The idea I have about no grainfill, no sanding sealer, no primer and so fort is that those products are used for estetic reasons only.

    I have a Squier Classic Vibe and eventhough I love the guitar, I'm really not that fond of the thick layer of poly that's on it. I decided to get at it with a sanding block to thin the finish down. I did that and I think it made the guitar sound a little sparklier, more alive. And then I came up with the idea on building my own partscaster with as thin coat of paint as posible.

    Those products; grainfill, sealers and stuff all dampens the guitar, somewhat. So I'm going for a as thin as posible finish. It's gonna be hard to tell what makes the difference in sound compared to the CV because it's gonna be a complete different guitar – but I was keen on building my first partscaster anyway.

    A good chance to try this theory I have on guitars drenced in layers and layers of laquer sound …well a bit drenced.
     
  18. sleazy pot pie

    sleazy pot pie Tele-Afflicted Gold Supporter

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    You should check out a product called Rubio Monocoat. It is for finishing floors , all natural, easy to apply, and comes in a ton of colors. You can even mix the colors to create your own shades. You just buff it into the wood with a scotch brite pad. You can get a great woody feeling finish without having to grain fill or seal the body. I used it on a pine body and it feels like an old pair of jeans. Much easier for a first time finish than nitro.
     
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  19. Jakeboy

    Jakeboy Tele-Afflicted

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    I am in the middle of a Tung-oil build....sanded down to 1000grit....maple cap is like a mirror, but satin.....and the rest is HEAVY swamp ash...I can still feel the grain, but this one is supposed to be rustic.
     
  20. lammie200

    lammie200 Friend of Leo's

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    You might want to run some tests. The color of the grain that results with the red that you want to use may not be what you are expecting. It could be orange/honey looking. That is why some people fill with black and sand it back to only fill the deepest grain pockets. Then they shoot the color coats.
     
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