Paint code for gold base coat-Candy apple red

Discussion in 'Finely Finished' started by Missing Link, Jul 21, 2019.

  1. Missing Link

    Missing Link Tele-Meister

    Posts:
    149
    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2018
    Location:
    USA and UK
    Looking for as close as I can get the gold base color code used on the 1965 Fender Jaguar with the candy apple red top coat.
    I found a few like BP/ M6924A that is a Sunburst Gold Metallic used on a 2001 Mercury but this way after 1964-65.
    I am not even sure Fender had a paint code for this but as they used a lot of car paint colors maybe someone has that number.
    Thanks
     
  2. Fretting out

    Fretting out Tele-Meister

    Age:
    27
    Posts:
    498
    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2019
    Location:
    Land of Mary
    On the old custom color charts they have the codes next to the color will that give you the undercoat or just the top color?
     
  3. Buckocaster51

    Buckocaster51 Super Moderator Staff Member Ad Free Member

    Age:
    67
    Posts:
    20,198
    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2005
    Location:
    Iowa USA
    Admin Post
    to do that right, it will be a two step process

    1)goldish base coat

    2)translucent red overcoat

    I would look at House of Kolor for solutions
     
    RodeoTex likes this.
  4. RodeoTex

    RodeoTex Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    8,316
    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2005
    Location:
    Nueces Strip
    The StewMac trans- cherry in spray cans does a nice candy finish over Duplicolor gold base.
     
    Buckocaster51 likes this.
  5. TeleTucson

    TeleTucson Tele-Afflicted Ad Free Member

    Posts:
    1,322
    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2016
    Location:
    Tucson, AZ
    A really striking beautiful deep red metallic is the award-winning Mazda color you see on the street:

    Mazda 46V Soul Red Crystal Tri-Coat

    It's three layers on top of a specific base coat, with the clear coat counting as one, if I got it right. Amazing, head-turning, rich color. To me, it looks kind of like the 1965 Fender Jaguar candy apple red, but better.

    Here's someone doing the whole sequence:

     
    Last edited: Jul 21, 2019
  6. Dacious

    Dacious Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    6,689
    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2003
    Location:
    Godzone
    No-one can say with any definitive surety. They can give you an opinion. Fender specified Du Pont paint chips, but bought equivalents from whoever had it in stock - Ditzler etc. Plus 65 they were still using nitro topcoats so any examples today are likely darker and browner.

    If you use a strong bright rather than bronzy gold with not too big a flake size and the translucent candy reds you can't really go wrong. Hotrodders can do this in their sleep.
     
  7. Missing Link

    Missing Link Tele-Meister

    Posts:
    149
    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2018
    Location:
    USA and UK
    It seems as the original base paints be it silver or gold is not one of the easiest colors to find with a color code. There is a FireMist Gold a DuPont color #4579L that maybe the color but not sure. I know from1964 on, Fender was what I call coming out of the Technicolor era into a much more boarder era were they were in search of more colors as so was the car industries, I guess this is were color codes were all over the place for a few year due to experimentation of colors.
    I most defiantly have some remains of gold from were the PO had sanded off most all the paint way down in the bridge pockets. I wanted to keep it as close as possible to the original base color as one can. I do not want candy colors of todays cars or hot rods that takes away its 1965, 54 year heritage of the two step procedures.
    Thanks guys
     
  8. Silverface

    Silverface Poster Extraordinaire Ad Free Member

    Age:
    67
    Posts:
    9,211
    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2003
    Location:
    Lawndale CA
    Correctamundo.

    1) Fender never released specific formulae or specific about all products used in every color system.

    2) They also changed products randomly . In the Pre-CBS days product type depended primarily on what was in stock on the day they needed it - especially with custom colors, which is why some have even shown up as having been done in oil-based enamel with no topcoat! And in the CBS days a) much of the "choice" was whatever was cheapest in the total lot of products they bought on an annual negotiated pricing contract from one supplier, and b) in case of "out fo stock" situations they'd still send someone down to Fullerton Paint or one of the other local stores to buy whatever would work. this is why the only "rule" about exactly what product was used in any part of the coating of a specific Fender guitar from the 50's to the early 80's is there WAS no rule.
     
IMPORTANT: Treat everyone here with respect, no matter how difficult!
No sex, drug, political, religion or hate discussion permitted here.


  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.