P-90 staple top pick up

ping-ping-clicka

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Yes I copied and pasted this from a review because I wanted to find out about "StapleTop P-90's​

I read the review and thought hey, dude, those curious folks over at the tele site might find this review interesting , well there probably some body around here that's going to build and offset guitar and is thinking telecaster mmmmm maybe a P-90 in the neck with a hum cancelling dimarzio tele bridge pickup It might be cool to have a p -90 in the neck and a hum cancelling pick up Dimarzo 58 or 61 pick up in the middle,it could happen?

A fine replica of a “forgotten” pickup.​



Gibson’s Alnico V pickup—usually called the “staple pickup”—is one of the great forgotten guitar gizmos. Introduced in 1954 as a more articulate version of the P-90 pickup deployed in most post-WWII Gibson electrics, the staple pickup occupied the neck position in the first Les Paul Customs. It also appeared in some of Gibson’s upscale archtops. But it was abandoned overnight when Seth Lover’s humbucking PAF pickup debuted just two years later, changing everything.

The humbucker has been the default Gibson pickup ever since, though there have always been fans of the rough, raw P-90 sound. That’s especially so today, as the P-90 is enjoying renewed popularity—not just in Gibson-flavored guitars, but also in Fender-style instruments and various modern hybrids. Which makes this a great time to revisit the staple design.
There’s a greater sense of “air” on top, and the individual notes in chords speak more clearly.
The Spirit of ’55
Lollar’s Staple aims to capture the magic of the original. Unlike regular P-90s, where steel pole pieces make contact with an internal coil and magnet, the staple’s pole pieces are themselves elongated rectangular magnets that extend through the coil. Gibson probably created the design to compete with the brighter tones of the DeArmond pickups in rival Gretsch guitars, not to mention those newfangled Fenders. And sure enough, the design yields better string-to-string differentiation and improved high-end detail.

I installed the Lollar Staple in the neck position of PG’s house P-90 guitar, a recent-model Gibson SG Traditional. (Staple pickups have the same dimensions as P-90s, so they’re an easy retrofit.)

But before performing the swap, I made benchmark recordings with the factory neck pickup to better gauge how the Staple pickup might alter the character of a P-90 guitar.
Ratings
Pros:

An elegant, more hi-fi alternate to a traditional P-90. Works great with a P-90 bridge pickup. Looks bitchin’.
Cons:
None.
Tones:
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Build/Design:
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Value:
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Street:
$145
Lollar Staple P-90 Pickup
lollarguitars.com
Screw vs. Staple
You definitely hear a difference! Staple pickups are sometimes described as “twangier” P-90s, but I don’t feel that’s quite the right description. The Lollar Staple isn’t unduly bright, and it certainly sounds nothing like a vintage Fender pickup. (If that’s your goal, check out Lollar’s Alnico Pole P-90, which is sort of a Fender single-coil in soapbar clothing.) For me, “extended range P-90” is a better description. There’s a greater sense of “air” on top, and the individual notes in chords speak more clearly. When toggling between my P-90 and Staple test recordings, the latter have more snap and presence, and the P-90s can feel dull in comparison. Yet the Staple sound blends well with a typical P-90 bridge pickup. You just get a bit more air and clarity in the combined position.

However, my demo clips feature the Staple alone, because your P-90 bridge pickup might not sound like ours. Vintage P-90s can display significant tone and output variations from unit to unit, and modern winders interpret the P-90 in varying ways. But on average, staples and P-90s have similar output. (In Lollar Land, a standard P-90 is wound to 8.2k, just a tad less hot than their Staple’s 8.9k.)

Rough or Refined?

It’s not terribly hard to decide whether a Staple pickup is a good option for you. If you have a P-90 guitar, chances are you dig the pickups’ rude attitude and have made peace with the fact that, like all single-coils, they’re a bit noisier than humbuckers. With a Staple swap, you can remain as nasty as you want to be at the bridge, but you have the option of clearer and prettier neck pickup sounds, plus a bit more openness when blending neck and bridge. It’s strictly a matter of taste. (I don’t happen to own a P-90 guitar right now, but if I did, I’d definitely consider the Staple switch.)

The Verdict

The Alnico V design is a classy, relatively hi-fi alternative to the traditional P-90, and Lollar’s gorgeous-sounding Staple P-90 is a stellar incarnation of the design. If you like the basic P-90 flavor but feel it might benefit from a touch of treble clarity at the neck, it may be time for a transplant.
 

Wallaby

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I wonder how the A5 staple pickups sound compared to A5 magnetic pole P90's ( using round magnets as pole pieces vs the rectangular magnets as poles. )

Do the Staple pickups have pole elevators?
 

bendercaster

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I have one of those much-hated robot tuner Gibsons, that came with Alnico pole P90s. It is definitely a different flavor of P90, but I really like it. It is more hi-fi, and a little brighter and more jangly than a screw pole P90. As I recall, In their literature at the time they came out, Gibson compared them to the old staple pickups.
 

RodeoTex

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20221002_173304.jpg

I recently put this Lollar Staple in this guitar. It was listed as a bridge pickup with an average resistance of 14.2K (this one is 15.3K)
It's really a grinding screamer for sure. Great sound if that's what you're after.
I'm considering ordering their neck version which is listed at 8.7K.
 

mandoloony

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The originals and the Duncans have a sound that's close to Alnico-rod P90s, but with a little more depth to the lows. I'm not honestly sure what makes the difference; the only thing I can think of is that the staple magnets are longer, and I know some people say that affects the sound of Dynasonics. The Lollar staple is a bit cleaner and tamer than the originals and the Duncans, but still a very nice pickup; I have one in the neck of my G&L Fallout.

There's a Korean brand called Premium Guitar Kits that makes a really nice soapbar staple. The poles are fixed (like Lollar's) but the output and twang are closer to the originals and they're $70 a piece. I've put them in several guitars with superb results.
 

brookdalebill

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These are my Seymour Duncan Custom Shop Alnico V Staple pickups, in my 2008 R6.
I ordered the neck pickup first.
I liked it so much, I asked them to make a RWRP bridge version.
I also requested they wind the bridge pickup slightly hotter.
The pickups sound great, very clear, warm, and articulate.
F2B1E3AF-1602-4871-8069-BDFEA6C42B50.jpeg
B557D0A0-6BD5-42B9-810D-BF7B812E8B79.jpeg
5988606B-056C-4070-8A92-37856254A3F1.jpeg

They also custom made an extra tall bridge pickup cover.
They do not normally offer this pickup for the bridge position.
They we’re not cheap, at over $300 each, but they most assuredly ARE worth it.
They are the only true single coils I own on any of my dozen electric guitars.
The Seymour Duncan Custom Shop really came through for me!
 

mandoloony

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Duncan does offer those for the bridge position, though I don't know about the extra-tall cover. They run $230/ea or $440 for a set when you buy direct.
 

brookdalebill

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Duncan does offer those for the bridge position, though I don't know about the extra-tall cover. They run $230/ea or $440 for a set when you buy direct.
Cool!
I see that on their site.
I guess they charged a little more to make the bridge pickup RWRP, and slightly hotter.
I did not contact SD directly, it was done through the shop that ordered and installed them.
I got them several years ago.
They’re my all time favorite single coil pickups.
 

bender66

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There's a Korean brand called Premium Guitar Kits that makes a really nice soapbar staple. The poles are fixed (like Lollar's) but the output and twang are closer to the originals and they're $70 a piece. I've put them in several guitars with superb results.
Eyguitar has the same pickups for half that. I bought the low output neck version.
 

kookaburra

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Interesting topic, thanks ping!

What little I’ve heard mirrors the info here, plus more. A staple model might be fun to try in the neck of one of my P 90 guitars.
 

NoTeleBob

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I listed to Lollar's sound samples of the Staple vs. their Alinico 5 p90. I thought the Alnico 5 had more clarity and less grit. a little more bell, if you will. If you're looking for more grit, then the Staple could be the way to go.
 

Fretting out

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These are my Seymour Duncan Custom Shop Alnico V Staple pickups, in my 2008 R6.
I ordered the neck pickup first.
I liked it so much, I asked them to make a RWRP bridge version.
I also requested they wind the bridge pickup slightly hotter.
The pickups sound great, very clear, warm, and articulate. View attachment 1044202 View attachment 1044203 View attachment 1044204
They also custom made an extra tall bridge pickup cover.
They do not normally offer this pickup for the bridge position.
They we’re not cheap, at over $300 each, but they most assuredly ARE worth it.
They are the only true single coils I own on any of my dozen electric guitars.
The Seymour Duncan Custom Shop really came through for me!
I’ve never noticed this before! They look like dynasonics with a small adjustable pole next to each fixed one

Are they of relation?

edit: I didn’t read again and just noticed someone brought dynasonics up
 

brookdalebill

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I’ve never noticed this before! They look like dynasonics with a small adjustable pole next to each fixed one

Are they of relation?
They are said to be similar.
The magnet height adjustment on both are mechanically similar.
I have owned Dynasonics, and though I like em’, they’re a little harsher/brasher sounding, IMO.
I find Dynasonics a little louder than the Staples.
Alnico V Staple pickups sound like really good Strat pickups, IMO.
 




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