Overspray from sides landing on guitar top/back

TheFullMonty

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Dec 27, 2012
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Hi all,

As the title indicated, I'm having some lacquer overspray issues on some Fender bodies I am practicing on. I lay down a few very thin passes on the top and back to build one coat, which ends up smooth and uniform. When I spray the sides, however, the overspray lands on the top and back, drying into rough tiny pebbles that don't coalesce with the previously laid coat of lacquer. I have tried spraying the sides first, which does produce better results, but the overspray still causes a textured finish on the top and back. I have sprayed the bodies on a rotisserie-style horizontal setup, as well as hanging vertically with similar results.

I suppose I could add some retarder to slow down the lacquer, but I am trying to keep my drying times to a minimum. Does anyone know of a workaround besides this?

I am spraying Finisher's Choice right out of the can through a Qualspray LVLP gun. Mean temperature is ~70 degrees F with a humidity of around 40%.

Thanks!

Edit: it turns out it’s very difficult to photograph, but maybe this will give you an idea of the texture.
 

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telepraise

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Overspray is an unavoidable fact of life IME. I lay the body flat on some blocks, shoot the rims as heavy as I can without runs and then spray the top or back. This limits your overspray to the rims, less to sand out. I find I get better flowout on the top or back with the guitar in that position. Of course you can follow the same sequence except hang the guitar for spraying the top and back at the same time.
 

Freeman Keller

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I do exactly as Telepraise - guitar is flat on its top or back on blocks on a small table that I can walk around. I start at one end, walk around shooting the sides then back and forth on the top or back. I do the other side in another session. When I'm shooting the sides I'm about 45 degrees off vertical so there isn't a lot of overspray wrapping around.

This also assures that the sides get a little more finish but I don't know if that is really important.

IMG_4751.JPG
 

Beebe

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Jun 1, 2021
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Not sure if this will help you but... To spray a wet enough coat with my LVLP, I found I needed to up the pressure, increase the spray distance, and move very slow.

And its probably just the picture, but that looks a little like white pigment from a previous spray becoming unstuck in the gun.

Do you know if there are any clear pigments in the product? It also looks like it could be pigment particles clinging to themselves. Adding a dispursant could help if that's the case, or giving it a shake.
 




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