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"OTHER" ID a classical oboist?

Discussion in 'Other Guitars, other instruments' started by billy logan, Jan 25, 2021.

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  1. billy logan

    billy logan TDPRI Member

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    Oboe sounds brittle and stiff, but in a charismatic way, ime.

    Maybe it has less distance from quietest possible to fortissimo than, say, a clarinet or a trumpet? Those mysterious oboe and bassoon reeds are so different from clarinet and sax reeds.

    HOWEVER! I heard on classical radio station an oboist playing with lots of expressiveness .Melismas. Not brittle.

    maybe he has unique breath control or embouchure, or
    maybe he uses a radically softer (?) or harder (?) reed than most oboists do, or
    Maybe he's a maverick and just ignores conventional oboe teaching. Whatever.

    When the classical station DJ announced the track all I caught was his first name is an Eastern European version of Kristov. Khrystof, idk The spelling could be quite different. Possibly Czech or Polish.

    He was like the Little Walter of classical oboe !!!!!!! (very fluid amplified harmonica style)

    ok folks. Help me ID this talented fellow. could be a lady named Kryztohv. Please ask your nerdy sibling at the conservatory if that rings a bell. Thanks.
     
  2. grandstick

    grandstick Tele-Holic

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    Could it be the German oboist Christoph Hartmann?

     
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  3. billy logan

    billy logan TDPRI Member

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    I thought I was just going to listen to a minute or two, but then it took me to the end! Cristoph Hartmann performing there DOES PLAY VERY expressively. The whole video is great; it sounded really rich just through my laptop's speakers. Haydn also did a good job on the composition. Thank you, grandstick.

    Now, I should confess I had WRITTEN DOWN the name of the mystery fellow - heard him on radio in the summer when I was away from home - maybe from the radio station's playlist - AND LOST IT!* So I knew from the spelling that it wasn't the mystery woodwind virtuoso. The spelling of the Mystery Oboist's "Cristoph" is farther away from what English speakers would expect than "Cristoph". there's a z and y in there. and had a diacritical mark or two, maybe. plz 4give me.

    Idk a whole lot about oboe; I can't see how this Haydn could be played better than Mr. Hartmann did.
    It will be fascinating to compare Mr. Hartmann's expressive style with that of "Kryzthof ______", when he's found.

    *I don't know, Myrtle, this guy's story keeps changing.
     
    Last edited: Jan 26, 2021
  4. Dan German

    Dan German Doctor of Teleocity

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    What do you do if your oboe catches fire?

    Use it to light the bassoon!

    Thanks for posting that, I actually love double reed instruments! (Nerd alert: I played bassoon in junior high and high school.)
     
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  5. schmee

    schmee Doctor of Teleocity

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    For some reason I dont think of "oboe" as brittle or stiff....? I think "smooth and syrupy" ...?

    But for a side trip: Have you heard a Bass Clarinet? A band played before us at a festival and man this guy was killer good, such a rich, mellow low end out of that instrument.
     
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  6. Togman

    Togman Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

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    Whenever I hear the Oboe mentioned I always think of this piece that is always played during the last night of the Proms.

     
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  7. billy logan

    billy logan TDPRI Member

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    Did you know??? The theme of the Alfred Hitchcock TV show, featuring a brittle and syrupy and stiff and smooth bassoon, is titled "Funeral March of a Marionette" ?

    And the circus clown song's called, "Entry of the Gladiators"

    Puzzling names. A bit alarming.


    Also, schmee, that bass clarinet vid I found fascinating, and I didn't know they could play that high.
     
    Last edited: Jan 26, 2021
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